Edit
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989) Poster

Trivia

The animated short Tummy Trouble (1989) was released theatrically with this movie. Many credit the success of this film towards audiences wanting to see more of Roger Rabbit.
Jump to: Spoilers (1)
In an early version of the script, there were five kids, one of which died during the sprinkler sequence.
Chevy Chase and John Candy both turned down the role of Wayne Szalinski. Candy did however suggest Rick Moranis for the role. This also had happened when Moranis was offered Ghostbusters (1984).
The neighborhood seen in the film is not real, it was built at the back lot of Churubusco Studios. An English garden located at the studio served as the "backyard," and the houses were cleverly placed around the garden to hide the studio buildings from most directions.
The film's original title was "Teenie Weenies", which was rejected on the grounds that it sounded too much like a kiddies' film with no appeal to adults.
Joe Johnston's directorial debut.
This movie was filmed at the back lot of Churubusco Studios in Mexico City at the end of 1988 and the beginning of 1989.
Composer James Horner incorporated Raymond Scott's jazz piece, "Powerhouse," into his score without paying royalties or providing attribution. Scott's estate threatened to sue Disney after the movie was released. After prolonged negotiation, Disney paid the estate an undisclosed sum in an out-of-court settlement. While on-screen credits were not changed, cue sheets for the movie do note the use of Scott's piece.
Quark, which is the dog's name in the movie, is an elementary particle and a fundamental constituent of matter. Quarks combine to form composite particles called hadrons, the most stable of which are protons and neutrons, the components of atomic nuclei.
The Society for the Preservation of English Language and Literature (SPELL) awarded "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" with its 1989 Dunce Cap Award, citing the title's grammatical error of using the word "shrunk" instead of "shrank." An unnamed Disney executive responded that the incorrect usage was on purpose and directly referenced a line of dialogue.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
For the scene in which miniaturized Nick Szalinski drops into a bowl of Cheerios cereal, a tank was filled with 16,000 gallons of a milk-like substance made from chlorinated water, food thickener, and pigment. The Cheerios were made from tractor inner tubes, twelve feet in diameter, coated in foam.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Critical reception for this film was generally positive, and the film was a box-office success, grossing $22.2 million in its first week of release. First-week earnings surpassed Disney's "previous highest single-week record of $20.6 million recorded by Three Men and a Baby. This film went on to gross $130 million in theaters and became the sixth-highest grossing home video of 1990. A 28 Jun 1989 LAT article called Disney's decision to pair Tummy Trouble with Honey, I Shrunk the Kids "a master stroke," and suggested the film benefitted from moviegoers who were unable to secure tickets to sold-out releases of Batman (1989), the highest-grossing release with the same opening weekend as Honey, I Shrunk the Kids.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Screenwriter Jeffrey Kouf sued Disney, claiming the idea for Honey, I Shrunk the Kids was stolen from his screenplay about "a boy who invents a people-shrinking formula." The lawsuit was rejected by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which upheld an earlier ruling by a federal judge that the works were not "substantially similar."
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This is one of three films released in 1989 to feature an animated title sequence. The other two are National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation (1989) and Troop Beverly Hills (1989).
Walt Disney Pictures was on board to produce Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, with Stuart Gordon attached to direct. However, Gordon became ill and dropped out, prompting Smith to recommend former ILM art director Joe Johnston as his replacement. Johnston suggested changes to the screenplay, which he found too special effects-heavy and lacking in dimensional characters, and Tom Schulman was brought on for a rewrite.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The scenes involving the adult characters were shot first, followed by special effects-heavy scenes in which the children worked on oversized sets. To blend the normal-sized and miniature worlds, footage from first and second units was combined with blue screen material, special effects shots, and Vistavision reductions.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Patrick Brown is the only actor to appear in both Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989) and Honey, I Shrunk the Kids: The TV Show (1997).
8 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The titles "Grounded" and "The Big Backyard" were considered and subsequently dropped during pre-production.
8 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sets and props took more than nine months to build. A May/Jun 1989 Disney Channel Magazine article reported that twelve houses, complete with front and backyards, were built in addition to a ten-foot-tall oatmeal cookie made from polyurethane foam and real cream filling, forty-foot-tall urethane foam blades of grass, and a giant mechanical ant that required a dozen puppeteers to operate. The ant was constructed using latex foam core and horse hair, and recreated for stop-motion sequences in which the children rode atop the insect.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This film original release date was December 1988, but delayed to June 1989.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Martin Short was initially attached to play Wayne Szalinski, but was later replaced by Rick Moranis.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Wayne is nearly shrunk by his shrinking machine, however he is shrunk along with Diane and their relatives in the direct to video sequel Honey We've Shrunk Ourselves.
4 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The theatrical release included a seven-and-a-half-minute animated short which preceded the film titled Tummy Trouble, featuring "Roger Rabbit" from Disney's recent blockbuster Who Framed Roger Rabbit. Tummy Trouble marked the first animated short Disney had released since 1965, and it cost $1.8 million. After an initial trailer devoted entirely to Honey, I Shrunk the Kids played in theaters for three months, another trailer for the film devoted its first two-thirds to the short, aiming to draw in Roger Rabbit fans.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In the movie the children name the ant Andy. In real life all worker, soldier and queen ants you see are female. So really they should have called it a female name like Mila. Male ants are called drones and don't do any work in the colony, they don't look like ants and only live for a few months during the nuptial flight seasons.
4 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Marcia Strassman (Diane) and Robert Oliveri (Nick) were both born on April 28.
5 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

When the cops get back in the car and see a missing children report for Szalinski, the previous record for the Szalinski household states 12 counts of Disturbing the Peace. This is definitely consistent with Big Russ' feelings towards Wayne and his experiments.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page