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Godzilla vs. Biollante (1989) Poster

Trivia

After this film failed in the Japanese box office, Toho believed it was because Biollante was an unfamiliar kaiju to the fans. So, Toho decided to bring back old enemies of Godzilla for the next few films, beginning with _Gojira vs. Kingu Gidorâ (1991)_.
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It took over twenty crew members to manipulate Biollante in its final form.
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Was originally going to feature a fish-rat hybrid named Deautalios, another of Dr. Shiragami's creations. Deautalios was to battle Godzilla and lose, after which Godzilla devoured the creature's flesh. Later on, Deautalios was written out and replaced with the rose form of Biollante.
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In Fall 1985, Toho held a contest to decide the plot for the next Godzilla movie, inviting writers and fans to submit story treatments for the project. Out of the 5,024 submissions, and with 10 finalists, the winner was Shinichirô Kobayashi, a dentist and part-time screenwriter. Kobayashi, a big fan of Godzilla and Ultraman, had done the story treatment for Episode #34 ("The Forgiven Life") of Return of Ultraman (1971), which inspired this film's story. Originally geared for a December 1986 release, King Kong Lives (1986) was released in Japan and bombed at the box-office. Toho assumed that the movie failed because there was no interest in giant monster films, and "Godzilla Vs. Biollante" was scrapped. Finally, in 1989, the project was revived for Godzilla's 35th Anniversary. After the script was heavily altered, the movie was greenlit by Summer, filmed from early August to late November, and released to theaters on December 16th. However, the second place script ("Godzilla Vs. the Robot Army"/"Gojira tai Robotto Gundan," by Jim Bannon) would later become the other Toho science fiction film of 1989, Gunhed (1989).
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The destruction of the Twin Towers was done three times. All three takes were used in the film.
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A stop-motion animation sequence with Godzilla fighting Biollante's vines was filmed, but wasn't used in the finished movie because it didn't match with the other special effects footage.
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The scene with Dêmon Kogure (the KISS-like rock singer whose TV show has been interrupted by the media news of Godzilla's return) was one of the last scenes shot, and a last-minute addition to the film's story. Kogure (now Demon Kakka), a big Godzilla fan, is the frontman for the popular Japanese rock group, Sekima-II (formed in 1982). In 1984, around when Godzilla 1985 (1984) was being released, he competed in the "Godzilla Scream Competition" (a contest held in conjunction with the release of that film), and won first prize. In 1989, upon hearing about "Godzilla Vs. Biollante" being produced, Kogure had kept exclaiming on his radio show, "Why don't they let me be in 'Godzilla Vs. Biollante'?" Whether his pleas were heard or not, he was invited to Stage #3 on the Toho lot, where his scene was filmed on October 28.
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It took over 32 piano wires to operate the Final Form Biollante suit, then breaking the previous record held by King Ghidorah (22 piano wires).
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In early 1990, Toho entered discussions with Miramax to distribute the film. When the discussion broke off, Toho filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Federal Court, accusing Miramax of entering an oral agreement in June to pay Toho $500,000 to distribute the film. This lawsuit delayed the film's release for 2 years. An out of court settlement was reached with Miramax buying the rights to the film for an unreported figure. Miramax would've had entertained thoughts of releasing the film in theaters before the lawsuit, in the end it was decided to release the film straight to home video instead. HBO released the film on VHS in 1992 and Laserdisc in 1993. Miramax utilized the uncut English International Version of the film for this release.
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The shots of Godzilla moving in the ocean were filmed in Toho's "Big Pool" (where all of Toho's tokusatsu films film their water scenes from 1960 to 2004).
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Originally, Echo bridge got Ed Godziszewski to record the commentary for the DVD & Blu-ray release of the film (2012). They acquired the commentary from him and wanted to get it approved by Toho, but it didn't get approved in time for the release on December 4th, 2012.
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The members of the 1985 "Godzilla Story Finals Committee" were cartoonist Osamu Tezuka, sci-fi/fantasy writers Chiaki Kawamata and Baku Yumemakura, writer/actor/critic Mitsutoshi Ishigami, Toho Chairman Isao Matsuoka, and the film's executive producer Tomoyuki Tanaka.
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Ironically, while Bandai was the main licensor of Godzilla toys as of 1983 (and released toys tied in with the release of Godzilla 1985 (1984)), they made no toys for this film. However, they and other companies did do assorted model kits of Godzilla and Biollante, as they appeared in this film. Only in 1992 did Bandai release a soft vinyl Biollante toy for their Godzilla collection. The next film, Godzilla vs. King Ghidorah (1991), had a fully-promoted toy tie-in by Bandai, as did all Godzilla films since.
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First Godzilla film to be made in Japan's Heisei era (Emperor Hirohito had died early the same year, thus was the end of Showa and the beginning of Heisei).
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The tanks that fire lasers and missiles at Godzilla weren't in the original script.
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A Echo Bridge Employee said in a forum page that the reason why the film's R1 DVD & Blu-ray release was cancelled, because the source masters that were delivered by Miramax was in a Standard Version which is the english international version, when the employees saw it, they gave it a negative reception, because they didn't want to be released with a terrible quality, so instead they got the HD masters from Toho used on the 2009 Blu-ray.
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This is the only Godzilla movie owned by Miramax not to get edits, re-dubbed into English and replacing soundtracks before the uproar about foreign films being edited by Miramax from 2000-2004.
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Director Kazuki Ohmori in reality wanted to do a James Bond movie much more than a Godzilla one. This is the reason behind the movie's spy subplot and its various action scenes which take inspiration from American action films.
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Director Kazuki Ohmori admitted to producer Tomoyuki Tanaka that he did not like many of the earlier Godzilla movies and that he felt the series had been bogged down by its conservative production methods and uncreative writing. He therefore attempted to take the series into a new direction with this movie.
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Conductor David Howell didn't see the movie when he recorded the musical score. Instead, he tried to imagine what it might look like. The resulting soundtrack was so unusual that classic and familiar music tracks from Akira Ifukube were added into the movie.
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Was voted the best Godzilla movie in a 2014 poll among Japanese fans and movie critics. Ironically, its original release was not a success, which lead the studio to rethink their handling of the property and begin re-incorporating classic (and therefore marketable) Godzilla monsters into the following films instead of introducing new ones.
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The original script involved a fish-rat hybrid called Deutalios, which was to be created by Dr. Shirigami and fight Godzilla after growing to his size. This was removed to cut costs.
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Although it's been in development for five years, the movie was filmed in half the time it normally took to produce a Godzilla film. Biollante's design was only finalized halfway through and the final fight between her and Godzilla were filmed in the last minute.
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The story writing contest held for the movie produced over 5 000 entries. Among them were story concepts which had Hitler control Godzilla, along with other unusual ideas.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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