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Fright Night Part 2 (1988) Poster

Trivia

The books Alex looks at on the shelf in the library include the following: "The Castle of Otranto," an early Gothic novel, by Horace Walpole; "The Book of Vampires" by Dudley Wright (originally published in 1914 under the title "Vampires and Vampirism"); "The Transitive Vampire," by Karen Gordon (not a vampire book at all, but a humorous book about grammar); "Vampires," an anthology of vampire stories, edited by Alan Ryan; "The Dracula Book of Great Vampire Stories," edited by Leslie Shepard; and several editions of "Dracula," by Bram Stoker.
Jump to: Spoilers (1)
Soon after this film, Roddy McDowall and Fright Night creator Tom Holland were scheduled to meet with Live Entertainment chairman Jose Menendez to discuss making a third film, but plans died with Menendez, who was famously murdered by his sons.
Roddy McDowall and director Tommy Lee Wallace had an unpleasant lunch with Live Entertainment chairman Jose Menendez to discuss the film's distribution and marketing, and later the same evening the exec was slaughtered by his sons, Lyle Menendez and Erik Menendez. As news of the murders swirled around Hollywood the next morning, McDowall phoned Wallace and cracked, "Well, I didn't do it. Did you?"
Bob Bergen who did the roars and other sounds for the vampires blew his vocal cords recording the death screams and had to rest his voice for several weeks.
Julie Carmen watched the first film countless times and tried to emulate some of Chris Sarandon's mannerisms.
Writer/director Tom Holland was asked to return for the sequel, but he and original star Chris Sarandon were tied up making Child's Play (1988).
Julie Carmen initially wasn't interested in taking the role "because Regine's character was nothing more than an Elvira imitation," she told Fangoria in a 1988 interview. After the script went through revisions, she became so enamored with the role that she turned down other projects to ensure she had ample time to prepare for the part.
Julie Carmen had never done any prosthetic makeup prior to this film, and she was so freaked out when they made the life mask of her head that she had a panic attack as the plaster hardened and then went home and burst into tears about the experience. As soon as she regained her composure, Carmen received a call from a crew member informing her that there had been a problem with the mold and she'd have to do it again the next day.
Stephen Geoffreys was offered to reprise his 'Evil Ed' character from Fright Night (1985) but he turned it down to take a starring role in 976-EVIL (1988), which was scheduled to film at the same time. After Geoffreys passed on the part, the script was revised and the Evil Ed character was renamed Louie, who was ultimately portrayed by Jon Gries.
In 1988, the film was adapted as a graphic novel released by Now Comics. This issue was a stand-alone which was not canonical with the publisher's ongoing 'Fright Night' comic book series.
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As it was scripted, the fight sequence in the library was intended to be a more elaborate battle which resulted in all of the bookshelves toppling like dominoes.
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The transgender vampire Belle doesn't say a single word throughout the film.
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Jon Gries, who plays the werewolf Louie also plays a werewolf in "The Monster Squad".
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Acclaimed choreographer Russell Clark portrayed Belle, the mute, androgynous, roller-skating vampire. He was hired not only for the dance sequence with Julie Carmen (Regine), for which they underwent rigorous 8-hour rehearsals, but also to coach his vampire costars to move together fluidly.
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Chris Sarandon, who played Jerry Dandrige in the first film, stopped by the set to show his support the day that the party at Regine Dandrige's apartment was filmed. Stills of him on location with Roddy McDowall and William Ragsdale exist.
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The character of Boz was modeled after Brian Bosworth, and Brian Thompson landed the role due to his resemblance to the athlete.
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It was Brian Thompson's idea for his character to recite the name of each genus and species of insect before he devoured them.
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After he landed the role of Richie, Merritt Butrick was diagnosed with AIDS, which was considered an instant-death-sentence in those days. He wanted to do the movie before he died and was candid with the crew about his health, since little was known about how the disease was transferred. Great precautions were taken to ensure that the vampire fangs wouldn't actually prick his skin and draw blood.
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Julie Carmen (Regine) retained many pieces of her on-screen wardrobe, which hung in her closet for decades.
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The movie had a $7.5 million budget and a 45 day shoot.
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Josh Richman auditioned for the role of werewolf Louie but landed the part of mental patient Fritzy.
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Josh Richman (Fritzy) improvised the scene where he mops the floor and talks to himself.
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The ray of light that Peter beams down the elevator shaft was animated and composited into the film.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

For his death scene, Brian Thompson (Boz) wore an appliance on his stomach filled with maggots, and he had to remain hunched over to keep them contained. As he waited for the setups, the wriggling of the bugs caused Thompson's abdominal muscles to spasm uncontrollably, but he muddled through and ultimately got the scene filmed.
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