7.0/10
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35 user 14 critic

A Dry White Season (1989)

Ben du Toit is a schoolteacher who always has considered himself a man of caring and justice, at least on the individual level. When his gardener's son is brutally beaten up by the police ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(novel) (as André Brink), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

On Disc

at Amazon

Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 7 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Ben
...
...
...
Captain Stolz (as Jurgen Prochnow)
...
...
Winston Ntshona ...
Thoko Ntshinga ...
Emily
Leonard Maguire ...
Bruwer
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Col. Viljoen
...
Andrew Whaley ...
Chris
Rowen Elmes ...
Stella Dickin ...
Susan's Mother
David de Keyser ...
Susan's Father (as David De Keyser)
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Storyline

Ben du Toit is a schoolteacher who always has considered himself a man of caring and justice, at least on the individual level. When his gardener's son is brutally beaten up by the police at a demonstration by black school children, he gradually begins to realize his own society is built on a pillar of injustice and exploitation. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 September 1989 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Assassinato Sob Custódia  »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$3,766,879
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to the movie's end credits, additional vocal performances in this film were provided by the cast of a production of the stage musical "Sarafina!" See more »

Goofs

When the camera pulls away from the court house (Harare City Hall) a bus drives past displaying an advertisement for Balkan Bulgarian Airlines, which flew to Zimbabwe, but not to South Africa under apartheid during the 1970s. See more »

Quotes

Ian McKenzie: I will take your case if only to make it abundantly clear how justice in South Africa is misapplied when it comes to the question of race.
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Soundtracks

YINI KODWA YINI
Written by Joseph Shabalala
Performed by Ladysmith Black Mambazo
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
Produced by Danny Lawson for Night After Night Ltd.
Additional vocal performances by the cast of Sarafina
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User Reviews

A different, but great take on the apartheid story
8 January 2004 | by See all my reviews

Donald Sutherland (one of Hollywood's most undervalued actors) is simply brilliant in this quiet and thought-provoking films. Many black people do not like to see white heroes in films about apartheid or racism. But the truth is, there are many white people who have contributed to the fight for justice, not for black people, but for humanity.

Marlon Brando is also fantastic. Unfortunately, Susan Sarandon's role is quite minimal.

The film is about a white teacher in a posh boys school (whites only) whose gardener asks for his help when his son is arrested and beaten up. The son later dies and the father seeks justice. Sutherland's character is faced with the reality that being a good person and minding one's own business may not be enough, especially when he realises that more is going on in his country than he knows about. As another reviewer has said, Marlon Brando's lawyer character perfectly showcases a brilliant man who has given himself to hopeless causes. he expertly shows in court the injustice that is going on. We see how the legal system worked for the oppressors; knowing this, Brando's character does it anyway. It is the principle that counts. Much like (in a totally different kind of film) King Theoden's words in the Lord of the Rings:The Return of the King, when it is noted that in no way will his army defeat the enemy, replies, 'yes, but we will meet them in battle all the same.' It was people like this who gave of themselves for the sake of others, maybe in future generations to which many of us owe our freedom.


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