6.3/10
1,820
25 user 11 critic

Disorganized Crime (1989)

Career criminal Frank plans a bank heist and sends for his buddies to help pull the job. Before his buddies arrive, he's caught, forcing his cohorts to pull the job alone. Frank soon escapes, setting off a search by the bumbling cops.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Sheriff Henault
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Frank Salazar
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Carlos Barrios
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Max Green
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George Denver
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Ray Forgy
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Bill Lonigan
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Nick Bartkowski
Marie Butler ...
Wanda Brem (as Marie Butler Kouf)
Gregory Wurster ...
Deputy Greg
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Deputy Monroe
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Deputy Larry
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Deputy Joe
Thomas Schellenberg ...
Deputy Jim
Robert K. Feldmann ...
Dispatcher (as Robert Feldmann)
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Storyline

This movie places some top thiefs, looking to steal money from a bank. The All-Star cast has many blunders on the way. Meanwhile a member of their group is missing and two cops chase after him. Written by <Lemiar28@AOL.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Five crooks without a plan. Two cops without a clue. And one bank vault without a scratch. See more »

Genres:

Action | Comedy | Crime

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 April 1989 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Message from Salazar  »

Box Office

Gross:

$7,723,506 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cable)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In several scenes Max suffers from heart problems. In a later interview, Fred Gwynne said that he actually had a real heart attack while filming one of those scenes. The cameras kept rolling as they called 911, and the director decided to keep the footage of the real heart attack in the movie. Fred got out of the hospital a few days later, and managed to finish the filming on schedule. See more »

Goofs

The smear of paint on the station wagon disappears See more »

Quotes

Carlos Barrios: [about sleeping man in backseat] Who's he? You seem to know everybody here, who's he then.
Ray Forgy: Don't know him.
Carlos Barrios: You don't know him?
Ray Forgy: Nope.
Carlos Barrios: I don't know him either.
Max Green: Me neither.
Carlos Barrios: [They stare at the man] Guess it's not fair not knowing who he is now that he knows who we are.
Nick Bartkowski: [man wakes up] Guess I'm not as famous as you guys. Nick Bartowski. Glad to meet you. Now we can be best friends. Well wake me when we get there then I'll get your fucking autographs.
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Connections

Featured in Biography: Fred Gwynne: More Than a Munster (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Too Fine a Lady
Written, Performed & Produced by Jim Stowell
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User Reviews

 
Very entertaining caper comedy.
24 November 2012 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

The efforts of a talented ensemble make all the difference in this movie from screenwriter / director Jim Kouf (who'd written the 1987 hit "Stakeout", among other things). It brings together a motley collection of big city criminals for a bank job in a small Montana town. This job is the brainchild of career crook Frank Salazar (Corbin Bernsen) who is arrested almost right away by a pair of New Jersey detectives, George Denver (Ed O'Neill) and Bill Lonigan (Daniel Roebuck). So Franks' team is left to figure things out and pull off the job on their own - if they can manage not to kill each other, as the sparks fly between them. The team consists of Max Green (Fred Gwynne), Carlos Barrios (Ruben Blades), Ray Forgy (Lou Diamond Phillips), and Nick Bartkowski (William Russ), Nick turning out to be an enormous pain in the ass for the other three. Frank manages to escape from George and Bill, who both turn out to be pretty stupid, and goes on a lengthy trek to get back to the hideout, while Max, Carlos, and Ray have their work cut out for them trying to repair the damage that Nick does. The major appeal of the movie lies, as previously said, in seeing these actors at work, and they make for an agreeable bunch of unlikely comrades. Gwynne is especially effective as the old pro among the thieves, and O'Neill deserves some sort of good sport prize for doing as many scenes as he does while not wearing pants. However, Hoyt Axton is rather wasted as the local sheriff. As the story plays out, one can hardly keep from feeling somewhat bad for Frank, who truly gets a raw deal. Another benefit is seeing a variety of very urban types in a very rural setting. One can tell this was actually shot on real Montana locations, and the non-Hollywood setting is refreshing. David Newmans' score is flavourful, and the photography is first rate. The movie doesn't necessarily deliver lots of belly laughs, but should generate some appreciative smiles as it bases itself on placing various characters in untenable situations. There are some good lines here and there, and there's one great farcical sequence where George is trying to cross a river. The climactic scene of Max and Nick breaking into the bank vault is a fun one, and it's not hard to root for them at this point. Ending on a high note (if also a fairly childish one), "Disorganized Crime" holds up fairly well 23 years later and moves forward at a good clip. Eight out of 10.


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