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Oscars flashback: Denzel Washington beams in front of his mother winning Best Supporting Actor for ‘Glory’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Denzel Washington beams in front of his mother winning Best Supporting Actor for ‘Glory’ [Watch]
In the late 1980s after six successful years on “St. Elsewhere,” Denzel Washington was making a successful segue into the movies. Just as that show was about to end for NBC, he received his first Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor as a South African activist in the 1987 film “Cry Freedom.” He lost the award that evening to Sean Connery (“The Untouchables”), but it would be just two years later that he would take home the gold for his performance as Private Silas Tripp in “Glory.”

See Oscar Best Supporting Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Watch his acceptance speech above from the 1990 Academy Awards ceremony as the 36-year-old actor beams in front of his mother and wife after presenter Geena Davis announces his name. He also thanks the men of the 54th from the American Civil War. In the film, Washington played an emancipated former slave
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 1990s went to many long overdue veterans of the industry. Actors like James Coburn, Jack Palance and Martin Landau finally earned Oscars in this decade, alongside then-newer stars like Cuba Gooding Jr and Kevin Spacey. What is your favorite Best Supporting Actor performance of the 1990s?

Read through a recap of their performances and vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actor.)

Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas” (1990) — Joe Pesci won his Oscar with the most iconic role of his career. In “Goodfellas” Pesci plays Tommy DeVito, a blustering gangster who provides some of the funniest lines in the film. Pesci was previously nominated in Best Supporting Actor for “Raging Bull” (1980).

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1990s: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme … ? [Poll]

Jack Palance, “City Slickers” (1991) — Jack Palance finally won his Oscar thanks to “City Slickers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017
The past year saw the loss of some renowned character actors, including John Hurt, Bill Paxton and Harry Dean Stanton. We were both shaken and stirred by the death of Roger Moore, who played James Bond more than any other actor. On the other side of the camera, directors Jonathan Demme as well as horror masters Tobe Hooper and George A. Romero died in 2017.

Here’s a month-to-month look at some of the biggest names in the film world who died in 2017.

In January, “The Elephant Man” star Hurt died on Jan. 27. The 77-year old actor also starred in “Alien” and “Midnight Express.” Emmanuelle Riva, the French star of “Hiroshima Mon Amour” and more recently, “Amour,” died on Jan. 27 at 89.

Bill Paxton, who appeared on TV in “Big Love” and in films including “Titanic” and “Aliens,” died Feb. 25. He was just 61.

The Silence of the Lambs” director Demme, who had been suffering from cancer, died April 26 at
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Wonder Wheel’ or: When Autopilot Woody Allen Goes on Autopilot

When Woody Allen makes a movie these days, it’s akin to watching a dart in midair as it readies to hit the board. When he makes a hit, it hits (‘Midnight in Paris‘, ‘Blue Jasmine‘, ‘Café Society’, even older hits such as ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors‘); when the project flops, oh boy, does it flop (‘You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger‘ and ‘To Rome with Love‘ [you know, the one Ellen Page said she regretted working on. She was right, just not for the reasons she believes]); and sometimes, there’s a middle ground where the movie can fall into either group (‘Magic in the Moonlight‘ and ‘Irrational Man‘). ‘Wonder Wheel‘ marks three milestones for Mr. Allen: his forty-eighth major motion picture as he turns, a reunion with iconic Italian cinematographer Vittorio Storaro after their previously acclaimed collaboration and directing Kate Winslet, certainly one of the most iconic actresses of today, in what
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Canon Of Film: ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors’

In this week’s edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look at one of Woody Allen‘s most popular films, ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors’. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

Crimes And Misdemeanors (1989)

Director/Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Part dark tragedy, part dark comedy, or is it all comedy? It’s certainly all dark to say the least. Considered by almost everybody as one of Woody Allen’s very best films (although I’m not sure Woody would agree), ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors’, wasn’t his first dramatic film, that was the Ingmar Bergman-esque ‘Interiors,’ and it certainly wasn’t his last comedy, yet it clearly represents the moment in Allen’s career when he started to abandon comedy in favor of drama and tragedy. Well, maybe “abandon,” is the wrong word, but he certainly began to lose interest in comedy around here.
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

In the Aftermath of Harvey Weinstein, Can We Separate the Art from the Artist? — IndieWire Critics Survey

In the Aftermath of Harvey Weinstein, Can We Separate the Art from the Artist? — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In the aftermath of the Harvey Weinstein story and all that it involves — as people reconsider their relationship to the Miramax films of the ’90s (or don’t) and brace for a new Woody Allen movie, etc. — we return to an age-old question that could always stand to be asked anew: How should the backstory of a film and / or its makers impact the way we receive it?

Kate Erbland (@katerbland), IndieWire

When horrifying accusations like the ones waged against Harvey Weinstein come to light, it’s very easy to scream for a boycott and move on (and, as we often see in cases like these,
See full article at Indiewire »

New York Film Review: ‘Wonder Wheel’

New York Film Review: ‘Wonder Wheel’
Woody Allen films now come in three essential flavors, or maybe it just comes down to three levels of quality. Once in a blue jasmine moon, he comes up with an enthralling act of high-wire inspiration, like “Match Point” or “Blue Jasmine,” that proves that he can still be as major as any filmmaker out there. Then there are the quaintly crafted, phoned-in mediocrities, like “Café Society” or “To Rome with Love,” where the jokes feel old and the situations older, like the Woody Allen version of paint by numbers. But then there are the middle-drawer Allen films that still percolate with energy and flair, like “Bullets Over Broadway” or “Vicky Cristina Barcelona.” They’re too baubly and calculated to be great, with each Woody trope locking into place, yet damned if they don’t hold you and even, in their way, add up to something (even if it’s ultimately something minor).

Wonder Wheel” is one
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jon Hamm Is a Great Actor, So Why Can’t He Find Another Great Role?

Jon Hamm Is a Great Actor, So Why Can’t He Find Another Great Role?
In his latest movie, “Marjorie Prime,” Jon Hamm plays a hologram who gives tender therapeutic advice to the aging lady he was once married to (it’s complicated), and if that doesn’t strike you as exciting, you’re not alone. The movie is a precious indie bauble that has already whiffed at the specialty box office. Hamm is crafty and spry in it; you might say — as some have — that it’s an adventurous role for him, in the same way that playing a violent sociopath with choppy shaved hair in “Baby Driver” was an adventurous role for him. These characters aren’t what we “expect” from Jon Hamm, so they make it look like he’s in there, trying on audacious things and working it. The question is: Why does Jon Hamm now look like he’s trying so hard?

I think what I’m asking is: Why isn’t Jon Hamm a movie star
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Elle Fanning and Selena Gomez Team for New Woody Allen Movie

Woody Allen officially revealed the cast of his new untitled feature film starring Timoth&#233e Chalamet (Call Me By Your Name), Elle Fanning (The Beguiled), and Selena Gomez (Spring Breakers). The film has already secured theatrical distribution through Amazon Studios. No production schedule or release date have been given for this new project. This will be the director's fourth time working with Amazon Studios since 2016.

Last year marked Allen's first collaboration with Amazon Studios, which acquired and released Caf&#233 Society, which starred Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Blake Lively, Parker Posey, Corey Stoll and Anna Camp. Amazon Studios financed and distributed the filmmaker's first foray into television, Crisis in Six Scenes, which the filmmaker also starred in alongside Miley Cyrus, Elaine May, Rachel Brosnahan, John Magaro, Lewis Black, Max Casella and Joy Behar. The filmmaker's third collaboration with Amazon Studios is his latest feature film, Wonder Wheel

Allen's latest completed theatrical
See full article at MovieWeb »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Landau Was a Slyly Versatile Actor Who, in Late Middle Age, Attained Greatness

Martin Landau Was a Slyly Versatile Actor Who, in Late Middle Age, Attained Greatness
Whenever Martin Landau, who died on Sunday, showed up in a movie or on a television show, you could count on him to add a spark — of tension, of mordant play — to the proceedings. His face, even in repose, spoke volumes, and what a face it was! In “North by Northwest,” with his sloped eyebrows and Roman-statue lips and leer of menace, he played a spy’s henchman who gleamed with officious danger. Landau kept himself still, so that you had to keep reading that face, scanning the malevolence behind it. He added another layer too: Landau, with Hitchcock’s approval, chose to play the henchman as gay, with a hidden crush on his boss (James Mason). Though the characterization fit the then-timely stereotype of homosexual villainy (this was 1959, after all), if you watch it now, it’s the subtext that humanizes the character. Landau’s eyes burn with a quality that only he would have had
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hollywood Reacts to Death of Oscar-Winning Actor Martin Landau

Hollywood Reacts to Death of Oscar-Winning Actor Martin Landau
Hollywood paid tribute on social media to Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, who died Saturday in Los Angeles.

Actors and filmmakers remembered Landau for his scene-stealing roles in films including, “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” and “Ed Wood,” and the TV series, “Mission: Impossible.”

In addition to those who celebrated the life and mourned the loss of the actor online, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce also announced Monday that flowers will be placed on Landau’s Walk of Fame star on Monday at 11:30 a.m. Landau’s star is located at 6845 Hollywood Boulevard.

His ex-wife, Barbara Bain, said in a statement, “If one could examine his DNA, it would read Actor. He embraced every role with fire and fierce dedication. Playing Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s ‘Ed Wood’ was his loving tribute to all actors and garnered him a well-deserved Academy Award. His work was his joy and his legacy.”

Alec Baldwin
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar Winner Martin Landau Dead At Age 89

  • CinemaRetro
Landau (center) with "Mission:Impossible" co-stars (clockwise) Peter Graves, Greg Morris, Peter Lupus and Barbara Bain.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has passed away at age 89. Landau had originally intended to be a cartoonist before studying at the esteemed Actors Studio in New York City. With his intense looks and persona, he began to be noticed by Hollywood studios. In 1959 he was cast as James Mason's gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock's classic "North by Northwest". It was Landau who suggested playing the role as a not-so-closeted homosexual, a rather daring strategy for the era. The result made Landau standout in a cast of heavyweights that included Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and Leo G. Carroll. Roles in epic films such as "Cleopatra" and "The Greatest Story Ever Told" followed. Landau also appeared regularly on popular TV programs including "The Twilight Zone", "The Untouchables", "I Spy", "The Wild,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

2017 celebrity deaths: Remembering Martin Landau, Mary Tyler Moore, Bill Paxton and more

2017 celebrity deaths: Remembering Martin Landau, Mary Tyler Moore, Bill Paxton and more
Oscar winner Martin Landau died on July 15 at the age of 89. The veteran actor won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in the film “Ed Wood” (1994) and received two other Oscar nominations for “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” (1988) and “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (1989). One of his first notable film […]
See full article at Gold Derby »

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar-Winning 'Ed Wood' Actor, Dead at 89
Martin Landau, the Oscar-winning Ed Wood actor who appeared in Crimes & Misdemeanors, North by Northwest and the Mission: Impossible TV series over a career that spanned over 50 years, died Saturday at the age of 89.

Landau died following "unexpected complications during a short hospitalization" at the UCLA Medical Center, his representative told The Hollywood Reporter.

The actor spent five years as a newspaper cartoonist in his native New York before deciding to focus on acting; As Landau often stated, he and Steve McQueen were notably the only two applicants accepted into
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Film News: Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

Los Angeles – His acting career spanned from working with Alfred Hitchcock to Tim Burton. Along the way, he had significant TV and film roles including a Best Supporting Oscar win for portraying Bela Lugosi in Burton’s “Ed Wood”. Martin Landau died in Los Angeles on July 15, 2017. He was 89.

He was one of the rare actors known both for distinctive parts in both television and film, and had a revival in his career towards the end of his life. Besides working for directors Hitchcock and Burton, he also has roles in films by Woody Allen, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Francis Ford Coppola and Frank Darabont. On television, he had an early role on “Mission: Impossible in the 1960s, and another on the cult series “Space :1999”

Martin Landau in a 2013 Appearance in Chicago

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Martin Landau was born in Brooklyn, New York,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

R.I.P. Martin Landau and George A. Romero

Yesterday, the film world lost a pair of legends as reports came in that both Martin Landau and George A. Romero had passed away over the weekend. These two titans of the industry impacted Hollywood in very different ways, but both left an indelible mark on cinema, that’s for sure. One was an actor whose career spanned decades, including recent awards worthy work. The other was an independent filmmaker who revolutionized a whole genre, one he would tinker with for decades, creating a franchise that spanned his entire career. Both will be greatly missed. The film world is a lesser place for having lost them. Let us now celebrate Landau and Romero a bit with a small tribute to the two departed talents. Landau (1928-2017) was a giant of acting. An Oscar winner for his supporting turn in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, he also had nominations to his
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

A great actor who grew into his gravitas: Martin Landau remembered | Peter Bradshaw

After making his mark on TV, the actor came into his own in his later years, with remarkable performances in Ed Wood and Crimes and Misdemeanors

Martin Landau: a life in pictures

Related: Martin Landau, star of Ed Wood and Crimes and Misdemeanors, dies aged 89

Martin Landau was the handsome, intelligent, reflective actor who was respected for first-class work in the theatre, and for his consistency and professionalism in films and TV in the 60s and 70s. But he gloriously came into his own in movies in his later years. Landau grew into his gravitas, and also into bittersweet human comedy and tragedy, in ways that were unavailable to him as a younger man. Landau was destined to be the career-opposite to his friend and contemporary from the early, hungry days in New York – James Dean. Maybe he would have ended his days regarded as hardly more than a safe pair of acting hands,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau dies aged 89 – video report

The actor Martin Landau died on Saturday aged 89. Landau, a New Yorker, rose to prominence in the 1960s when he starred in the TV show Mission: Impossible. During his lengthy career he worked with some of the industry’s best directors including Woody Allen, Francis Ford Coppola and Tim Burton. In 1995, Landau won an Oscar for playing Bela Lugosi in Burton’s Ed Wood

Martin Landau, star of Ed Wood and Crimes and Misdemeanors, dies aged 89 Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

R.I.P. Martin Landau (1928 – 2017)

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has passed away aged 89 after suffering “unexpected complications” following a hospital visit in Los Angeles.

Landau began his career as a cartoonist for the New York Daily News before moving into acting, with early roles in the likes of North by Northwest, Cleopatra and The Greatest Story Ever Told.

Between 1966 and 1969, he starred as Rollin Hand in the TV series Mission: Impossible, a role which saw him receiving the Golden Globe Award, as well as three Emmy nominations. He would later star in Space: 1999, and earned further Emmy nominations for guest roles in Without a Trace and Entourage.

On the big screen, Landau would be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for 1988’s Tucker: The Man and His Dream (winning a Golden Globe) and 1989’s Crimes and Misdemeanors, and would win the Oscar at the third time of asking for his role
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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