Blind Fury (1989) - News Poster

(1989)

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Awesometacular: Jeremy Plays Blind Fury & Talks 20 More Marvel Films on the Way

Jeremy Jahns offers his thoughts on the additional 20 movies Marvel has on the docket. He also plays around of Blind Fury with Mark Ellis and talks to Jon Schnepp about the comic book series American Flagg!. Jahns Solo also goes head to head with Darth Harloff in a lightsaber battle. Jeremy Jahns discuses Kevin Feige’s comment that Marvel has 20 more movies on the docket. After that, Collider’s Mark Ellis joins Jeremy for a round of Blind Fury during which they must guess a movie based on Ashley’s blind drawings. Jeremy and Kristian Harloff of Collider …
See full article at Collider.com »

Awesometacular: Jeremy Offers His Thoughts on ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’

Jeremy Jahns gives his thoughts on the official title for the upcoming Han Solo movie. He also plays a little Blind Fury with Mark Ellis and Ashley Mova. He talks about the new Star Wars: The Last Jedi trailer with Ken Napzok, learns about Constantine’s comic book origins with Jon Schnepp, and gives his thoughts on the very first trailer for The New Mutants. Jeremy Jahns discusses the recently announced official title for the Han Solo movie, Solo: A Star Wars Story. After that, Collider’s Mark Ellis joins Jeremy for a round of Blind Fury during which they …
See full article at Collider.com »

Exclusive interview with actor Eric Jacobus

david j. moore chats with actor Eric Jacobus

The world has yet to learn the name Eric Jacobus. Ladies and gentlemen, hear the name and speak it because he’s here, and he’s about to break through. Working way off the grid and completely off the radar, Jacobus, a practitioner of Hapkido, has been building himself up through impressive short films and totally independent feature films, namely with two feature films Contour (2006) and Death Grip (2012), both of which he wrote, directed, and starred in, and the outstanding short films Rope-a-Dope (2013), Rope-a-Dope 2 (2015), and this year’s martial arts comedy Blindsided (2017). He’s already appeared in the second season of Mortal Kombat: Legacy (2014) as Stryker and in Segment A of The ABCs of Death 2 (2014), and he’s on a clear and calculated path of action stardom.

It’s obvious you’re really into Hong Kong movies; your movies
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Don’t Breathe review: “An intense, shocking, claustrophobic corker”

Don’t Breathe review: Fede Alvarez follows up his redo of Evil Dead with an original genre piece that may just have you doing what its title commands…

Don’t Breathe review by Paul Heath, September 2016.

Original thrillers, those of quality anyway, are pretty thin on the ground these days. Occasionally something will come along that will blows you away, but it’s been a little disappointing of late. Bordering on horror, Evil Dead helmer Fede Alvarez‘s latest is a departure from his big Hollywood debut, this time leaving the supernatural world for a thriller featuring a minimal cast and an absolute bastard of an antagonist.

Don’t Breathe tells the story of three young inhabitants of a Detroit suburb – Rocky (Jane Levy), Alex (Dylan Minnette) and Money (Daniel Zovatto). The three are introduced to us in the middle of a home robbery where they set about a property
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Don’t Breathe review

Ryan Lambie Published Date Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 06:33

If you or any of your friends are criminally-inclined, take them to see Don’t Breathe; we guarantee you it’ll put just about anyone off burglary for life. This is the second feature from Fede Alvarez, the Uruguayan director of the slickly violent Evil Dead remake - a movie that was far better made and fun than it had any right to be. Don’t Breathe leans heavier on suspense than outright gore, but it remains a convincing showcase for Alvarez as an adept genre filmmaker.

The premise is as simple as an archetypal cabin-in-the-woods horror: a trio of disadvantaged early 20-somethings break into an old blind man’s house, expecting to find a life-changing haul of cash but instead find themselves face-to-face with a deadly adversary - and his equally terrifying hound.

We’ve seen the burglars-in-peril scenario in horror before,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 1989

From a crazy early Nic Cage role to a lesser-known film starring Robert De Niro, here's our pick of 25 underappreciated films from 1989...

Ah, 1989. The year the Berlin Wall came down and Yugoslavia won the Eurovision Song Contest. It was also a big year for film, with Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade topping the box office and Batman dominating the summer with its inescapable marketing blitz.

Outside the top 10 highest-grossing list, which included Back To The Future II, Dead Poets Society and Honey I Shrunk The Kids, 1989 also included a plethora of less commonly-appreciated films. Some were big in their native countries but only received a limited release in the Us and UK. Others were poorly received but have since been reassessed as cult items.

From comedies to thrillers, here's our pick of 25 underappreciated films from the end of the 80s...

25. An Innocent Man

Disney, through its Touchstone banner, had high hopes for this thriller,
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Three Ripening Cherries / Sensual Fire’ Review (Vinegar Syndrome)

Three Ripening Cherries

(dir: Carlos Tobalina, 1979)

“Ripe for Action ready to be plucked…’”

Don’t you just love sisters? Well, thankfully Uncle Tobalina has a film just for you! What we have here are the three sisters. Sally, Lucy and Ann played by Dorothy Lemay (Taboo, Chopstix), Misty Regan (Champagne Orgy, Baby Cakes) and my favourite, Brooke West (Fantasy, The Blonde). After a hard day at school, the girls go home and ask their mum Rose, played by Kitty Shayne (Sexual Heights, Undulations) all about sex. She tells them about her experiences when she was their age. We find out her virginity was robbed by a family friend leading her to seek out compassion whenever and wherever she could. Her journey to find the Perfect orgasm comes to an end when she meets the man who would become her husband. How very aromatic indeed! Inspired by her stories, the girls
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Tropic of Desire / Fantasy World’ Review (Vinegar Syndrome)

Tropic of Desire

It’s approaching the end of World War 2. Georgina Spelvin (The Devil in Miss Jones) plays as Frances, a madam of a small tropical island whore house. She caters for the constant stream of American sailors. One day Rita, one of her girls played by Kitty Shane (Vista Valley PTA) finds out that the love of her life has died in battle. Dsitraught, she heads back to San Fransisco. Soon after leaving, a trio of marines returning after a tour on the ocean arrive to get some downtime. One of them is Gus played by Ken Scudder (Hotline, Getting Off), a sailor whose heart belongs to Rita. He takes the news of her departure terribly and drowns his sorrows at the bar. It’s not all doom and gloom though as the other two, Jack and Phil played by Jon Martin (The Jade Pussycat) and Blair Harris (Expectations,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The top 20 underappreciated films of 1990

Odd List Simon Brew Ryan Lambie 19 Sep 2013 - 07:20

From dramas to action and everything in between, here's our pick of 20 underrated films from 1990...

Think back to the big films of 1990, and you'll probably immediately come up with things like Ghost, the year's top-grossing film, or maybe Home Alone, which made a star out of the young Macaulay Culkin.

If you're into sci-fi or action, you might pluck Total Recall, Back To The Future Part III or even Die Hard 2 out of your memory banks. But what about all those movies that didn't make it into the year's top 10 ranking films? As ever, there's a huge number of duds and forgettable flops, but there were plenty of films that were wrongly overlooked, too.

That's where this list comes in, which aims to shed a bit of light on 20 films that were either unfairly overlooked by audiences at the time, or
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 20 underrated films of 1990

Odd List Simon Brew Ryan Lambie

From dramas to action and everything in between, here's our pick of 20 underrated films from 1990...

Think back to the big films of 1990, and you'll probably immediately come up with things like Ghost, the year's top-grossing film, or maybe Home Alone, which made a star out of the young Macaulay Culkin.

If you're into sci-fi or action, you might pluck Total Recall, Back To The Future Part III or even Die Hard 2 out of your memory banks. But what about all those movies that didn't make it into the year's top 10 ranking films? As ever, there's a huge number of duds and forgettable flops, but there were plenty of films that were wrongly overlooked, too.

That's where this list comes in, which aims to shed a bit of light on 20 films that were either unfairly overlooked by audiences at the time, or have faded rapidly from general discussions about cinema.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Rutger Hauer is Awesome Double Bill - The Hitcher and Blind Fury

Tom Jolliffe takes in a Rutger Hauer double bill of The Hitcher and Blind Fury...

Rutger Hauer’s career has seen him star in an eclectic mix of both films and roles. He’s done art house, independent, blockbusters, and low grade b(z)movies. He’s plied his trade in Hollywood, and European cinema and filmed all over the world. He’s done just about every genre. He’s the leading man, he’s the villain. He’s the hero, the anti-hero and he’s played a vampire more times than most people have had hot dinners. There is always one consistent, which is that Rutger Hauer is cool. He can steal a good movie from under the nose of established stars, most infamously in Blade Runner, and also out shining Sylvester Stallone in Nighthawks. He can also elevate a lot of the B-grade material he’s appeared in.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

In praise of Terry O’Quinn

Perhaps best known as John Locke in the hit series Lost, we salute the sterling work of actor Terry O’Quinn...

Before Lost, actor Terry O’Quinn was perhaps most famous for his central role in 1987’s The Stepfather. One of several ‘killer in the home’ thrillers from the late 80s and 90s - others include Black Widow, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle, Single White Female and Pacific Heights - The Stepfather may have been an entirely forgettable film were it not for O’Quinn’s mesmerising performance.

O’Quinn plays an apparently mild-mannered man whose only goal in life is to enjoy all the trappings of the perfect family - a big house with a picket fence, obedient children, and a loving wife who bakes cookies, perhaps. Unfortunately, O’Quinn’s character is a sociopath, and so intolerant of the realities of parenting that he has a habit of killing his family,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 10 greatest Rutger Hauer films that aren’t Blade Runner

From the 70s to the present, we look back through the sterling work of Rutger Hauer to bring you the actor’s 10 finest films that aren't Blade Runner...

For some, Dutch actor Rutger Hauer will forever be associated with a certain rooftop speech about tears in rain. But although his turn as doomed replicant Roy Batty in Blade Runner was a classic one, Hauer’s output before and since has been stunningly prolific. This list, therefore, is designed to highlight 10 of Hauer’s finest non-Blade Runner movies, with a particular emphasis on those that are lesser known – which is why we've gone for some older pictures rather than the more recent and mainstream, such as Batman Begins. And since this is Den of Geek, expect to find lots of action movies, horror, and low-budget sci-fi in the entries below.

One thing they all have in common, though, irrespective of
See full article at Den of Geek »

The top 25 cult film actors

They may not be household names like their A-list colleagues, but the actors on this list have appeared in some of our all-time favourite geek movies...

Some actors dabble in sci-fi; others dip their toe into fantasy; some may even make an appearance in the odd horror film - all before returning to the safety of the genres in which they feel more comfortable - perhaps a nice, award-chasing period drama, or a well-paid romantic comedy.

A-listers may see the geeky films that we on this site enjoy and celebrate as fun little side-projects, but there are actors out there who commit full-time to these types of movies. It is high time, therefore, that we credited these individuals with the recognition they deserve.

Besides the stipulation that, in order to be included, an actor had to still be alive and working today, there were no strict criteria that had to
See full article at Den of Geek »

Enter the Ninja (1982)

Directed by: Menahem Golan

Written by: Dick Desmond, Mike Stone

Cast: Franco Nero, Susan George, Sho Kosugi, Alex Courtney, Christopher George

The Cannon Group struck gold with its first martial arts film, 1981's Enter the Ninja. Though Western audiences had seen ninjas before, most notably in the 1967 James Bond film You Only Live Twice, this movie changed how these shadow warriors were portrayed on the screen.

Transplanting martial arts mayhem into a gunslinger plotline, the ninja gained near-superhuman abilities and a more heroic disposition. The resulting film was successful enough for Cannon to launch two franchises (Enter the Ninja and American Ninja) and embedded the art of Ninjutsu into American pop culture.

The film opens as Westerner Cole (Franco Nero) is completing his final test in Ninjutsu, thus earning the right to practice and teach the art. But Hasegawa (Sho Kosugi), a high-ranking ninja in the dojo, isn't happy with
See full article at Planet Fury »

Tracee Ellis Ross, Malcom-Jamal Warner in 'Reed Between the Lines' for Bet

On Tuesday, October 11th at 8:00 P.M., hip hop headlines a night of TV when the .Bet Hip Hop Awards 2011. airs immediately before the series premiere of .Reed Between The Lines.. In its sixth year the .Bet Hip Hop Awards,. hosted by comedian Mike Epps, continues to deliver two hours of hip hop on television. This year.s show features performances by Dmx, Wale, Big Sean, Meek Mill, Rick Ross, Wiz Khalifa, Roscoe Dash, Swizz Beatz, Young Jeezy, T.I., Lupe Fiasco, Erykah Badu, Heavy D, along with seven sets including Chris Brown, Eminem, Rick Ross and his Maybach Music team, Joe Budden, Yelawolf, Estelle, Busta Rhymes, Eminem, Ludacris, Ace Hood, Blind Fury, and many more.
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Hobo With A Shotgun - An Interview With Rutger Hauer

'Hobo With A Shotgun' opens this Friday in UK cinemas - so what better way to prepare for the film's release than by reading an interview Rutger Hauer.Rutger Hauer is a legendary screen actor who has worked with just about any director you can name: bringing to life many of the screen's many iconic roles (from The Hitcher to Blade Runner to Blind Fury) he is one of cinema's bona fide cult stars. Q: The reaction to Hobo With A Shotgun has been nothing short of phenomenal . and rightly so.Rutger Hauer: I.m pleasantly shocked at how well the film.s been received, because I really didn.t see that coming. I knew that there was quite a following, but the
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Rutger Hauer on Hobo With A Shotgun

Thirty years on from Blade Runner, Rutger Hauer returns to the limelight with a violent, cult classic-in-waiting

To paraphrase Blade Runner's Dr Eldon Tyrell, "The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long, and you have burned so very brightly, Rutger." Mr Hauer is by no means burnt-out, he's still flickering along nicely in fact, but nothing in his subsequent career has quite matched his white-hot moment as Roy the über-replicant in Ridley Scott's sci-fi classic. He was such a believable model of Aryan perfection: too handsome and blond and blue-eyed to be naturally occurring, versed in chess, molecular biology and literature, and fond of reciting poetic epitaphs to himself. Many sci-fi fans can recite verbatim Roy's closing speech from the end of Blade Runner: "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe … All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cult Actors #3: Rutger Hauer – A One-Man Slaughterhouse

“Do you know what happens to an eyeball when it is punctured?” asks Rutger Hauer in The Hitcher (1985), sliding a switchblade up to The Kid’s eye, catching a tear on the glistening blade and watching it twinkle in the passing highway lights. This was not in the script and co-star C. Thomas Howell may have had to contemplate the fact that this bear-like Dutch actor might actually show him.

After all, with his manic intensity, reliance on gut instinct and bloody-minded commitment to character Hauer had become one of Hollywood’s favourite psychos. Roles in Blade Runner (1982) and Flesh and Blood (1985) had cemented his reputation as an unhinged cinematic killer – “a one-man slaughterhouse,” as one critic labelled him.

In the 1980s Hauer seemed fearless. Onscreen he was intense and regularly insisted on fucking with his audience (and co-stars) expectations. He claims he put the blade to Howell’s eye because it,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Phillip Noyce to direct the pilot of ABC's 'Revenge'

Phillip Noyce (Salt) will direct the pilot of ABC's Revenge, written by Swingtown creator Mike Kelley. According to Deadline, it is a contemporary re-imagining of Alexandre Dumas père's The Count of Monte Cristo but from a female perspective. The story of Revenge centers on Emily Thorn, a mysterious young woman who comes to the Hamptons to take revenge on those who destroyed her family. Temple Hill are producing Revenge with ABC Studios. Noyce previously directed pilots for Showtime's Brotherhood. Australian-born helmer Noyce directed films like The Saint, Blind Fury, Clear and Present Danger, Sliver and the strong Catch a Fire...
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »
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