Scientist Sam Beckett finds himself trapped in time, "leaping" into the body of a different person, in a different time period each week.
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5   4   3   2   1  
1993   1992   1991   1990   1989  
Won 2 Golden Globes. Another 16 wins & 43 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Dr. Sam Beckett / ... (97 episodes, 1989-1993)
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 Admiral Al Calavicci (97 episodes, 1989-1993)
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 Narrator / ... (65 episodes, 1989-1993)
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Storyline

Doctor Sam Beckett led a group of top scientists into the desert to research his theory that a man could time travel within his own lifetime. Unfortunately, in order to save his funding, he was forced to enter the accelerator prematurely and vanished. He then found himself in someone else's body with partial amnesia. His only contact from home is Al, a holographic image only he can see and hear. Setting right things which once went wrong, Sam leaps from life to life, hoping each time that this is the final leap home. Written by Kevin <Kibble@vm.temple.edu>

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TV-PG | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

26 March 1989 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A través del tiempo  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(97 episodes)

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Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Donald P. Bellisario established Sam Beckett's birth year 1953 by reversing digits of his own birth year 1935. However, in season one, episode five, "How the Tess Was Won", after Al tells Sam that it's 1965, Sam replies that's he was ten in 1965. See more »

Goofs

In the first season, Sam mentions having a sister named Katie. In the 2-part pilot "Genesis", Sam mentions that she married a Naval Officer named Jim Bonney. However, in the first season episode "The Kamikaze Kid", which hinges on Sam stopping a sister from marrying an abusive boyfriend, Sam mentions that Katie married and abusive alcoholic, later named "Chuck" in the "Leap Home" episode. It is very likely that Katie married Jim after leaving Chuck. Also, in "Disco Inferno," Sam mentions that he has a brother named Tom and that he died in Vietnam. He mentions this again in the episode "Animal Frat" before finally seeing Tom again in "A Leap Home." See more »

Quotes

Sam: Do you have to sneak up on me?
Al: I'm sorry. What do you expect a hologram to do? Knock?
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Connections

Referenced in The Angry World of Brian Webster (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Quantum Leap Main Title
Written by Mike Post
Courtesy of Music Corp. of America (BMI)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The greatest TV show ever. Could teach a thing or two to many feature films.
10 June 2007 | by See all my reviews

As a moviegoer, I don't have a great esteem for television. Sure, it has spawned many good shows, and cult characters. But I rarely felt the need to watch EVERY SINGLE EPISODE, afraid of missing even one. And believe me, I'm no short-sighted elitist.

But Quantum Leap is an absolute classic. It's got Heart, great characters, ambitious stories, and it's both accessible and clever. It may not be the strongest Sci-fi concept, but it's the most likely to reconcile the fans of Star Trek AND Magnum P.I. Who could've imagined that?

Donald Bellisario created a true gem of a show, centered around Dr. Sam Beckett (Scott Bakula) a scientist whose time-travelling theories are backed up by the military, represented by the retired Navy Admiral Al Calavicci (Dean Stockwell). The experiment goes wrong, and Sam is sent in the past, with most of his scientific knowledge and memories temporarily erased. His body vanished, his mind now trapped in other's bodies, and Sam soon discovers that a "superior authority" can transfer his mind from time to time, only if he manages to "fix what's broken" and give his "host" a better life. Al can communicate with him through holographic form (only noticeable by children, animals - "and blondes, too") in order to help Sam to complete his mission, whether it's to inspire a song to an artist, defend the case of a young Black in a Southern State court during the segregation days, or help a journalist to obtain a Pulitzer Prize while covering the war in Vietnam.

The variety and humanity of the show is what makes it stand above the others. Some episodes are light and humorous, when others are darker, even tragic. Some conclusions are bittersweet, and help the main characters to evolve slightly, but regularly throughout the show. What helps even more is the fantastic chemistry between the two main characters. Scott Bakula and Dean Stockwell have found the role of their lives, delivering touching, funny, overwhelming performances, sometimes in the course of only one episode! They're brilliant, as well as the writing, and art direction who recreates every decade from the 50's to the 80's (and sometimes beyond!) perfectly.

As for the ending... without spoiling it, it's by far the most astounding, bold and emotionally charged episode ever produced in the TV history, as far as I know. So many TV shows end up in disappointment (while so many don't even bother to give us a finale, at all...). "Quantum Leap" ending is rewarding, and intriguing. It's ambitious, happy and sad. It's both on the human scale, and larger than life.

Oh boy, what a show.


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