Scientist Sam Beckett finds himself trapped in time--"leaping" into the body of a different person in a different time period each week.
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5   4   3   2   1  
1993   1992   1991   1990   1989  
Won 2 Golden Globes. Another 16 wins & 43 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Dr. Sam Beckett / ... (97 episodes, 1989-1993)
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 Admiral Al Calavicci (97 episodes, 1989-1993)
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 Narrator / ... (65 episodes, 1989-1993)
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Storyline

Doctor Sam Beckett led a group of top scientists into the desert to research his theory that a man could time travel within his own lifetime. Unfortunately, in order to save his funding, he was forced to enter the accelerator prematurely and vanished. He then found himself in someone else's body with partial amnesia. His only contact from home is Al, a holographic image only he can see and hear. Setting right things which once went wrong, Sam leaps from life to life, hoping each time that this is the final leap home. Written by Kevin <Kibble@vm.temple.edu>

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TV-PG | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

26 March 1989 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A través del tiempo  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(97 episodes)

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Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The series actually traces its roots to the original Battlestar Galactica (1978), which Donald P. Bellisario wrote and produced for. The series' revival spin-off, Galactica 1980 (1980) was to originally center around time travel and returning changes in history back to normal. The concept was dropped after the pilot, but Bellisario stuck with the concept to develop into Quantum Leap. The concept of Sam inhabiting the identity of another person to incorporate change for the better was partly inspired by the movie Heaven Can Wait (1978), which in itself was practically a "word for word" remake of Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941), with the one exception of changing the lead character from a prize fighter, in Here Comes Mr. Jordan, to a Los Angeles Rams quarterback in Heaven Can Wait. See more »

Goofs

Despite being in a different body and seeing someone else's reflection in the mirror, Sam always has impeccably combed and styled hair. See more »

Quotes

Al: Women - you can't trust 'em. They don't understand the double standard.
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Connections

Referenced in Workaholics: Friendship Anniversary (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Prologue (Saga Sell)
Written by Mike Post and Velton Ray Bunch
Performed by Velton Ray Bunch with Deborah Pratt (voice over)
Courtesy of Music Corp. of America (BMI)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Basic Sci-Fi or dramatised sociology?
17 May 2006 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

I have to admit I may be a little biased as I've always had a soft spot for this programme. I recall watching the pilot when it was originally aired in the UK (1990 I think?) and remember, even then, being transfixed by the subsequent weekly 'leaps' of its main character, Dr. Sam Beckett.

I always thought it was more than just a Sci-fi/ comedic drama as, at times, it was incredibly insightful. The concept was completely innovative and didn't rely to heavily on expensive effects to convey the belief of time travel.

Sam's holographic sidekick Al Calavici (played by Dean Stockwell) provided an above average level of humour, making the viewer laugh out loud at issues which some would consider untouchable (his remark of 'bigot in a moo-moo' regarding one very ample character's racist comments being an example!)

There appeared to be no subject to dangerous to touch and that was what made the programme so engrossing. By examining key issues that could have affected anyone (sexual harassment, racism and teenage pregnancy to name a few), the viewer could not help but be drawn into a theoretical discussion as to the rights and wrongs of each subject.

I could go on but all I can add is that I highly recommend this T.V classic to newcomers as, once you've seen it, you will become as hooked as the millions of other devotees out there!


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