After Pat's other show, "Wheel of Fortune" (1975) enjoyed a surge of popularity in the late 80's, he decided to try his hand at hosting a late-night talk show. The format was similar to "... See full summary »
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1   Unknown  
1990   1989  
Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Himself - Host (9 episodes, 1989-1990)
Dan Miller ...
 Himself - Announcer (9 episodes, 1989-1990)
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Franklin Ruehl ...
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Lee Horsley ...
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Tom Scott ...
 Himself - Band Leader (4 episodes, 1989)
Dennis Wolfberg ...
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Pam Stone ...
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 Herself - Guest (2 episodes, 1989-1990)
Ron Luciano ...
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Jason D. Williams ...
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 Themselves (2 episodes, 1989)
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Anne Bloom ...
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Henry Cho ...
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Rick Dees ...
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Dion DiMucci ...
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Don Drysdale ...
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Bob Greene ...
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Fred Greenlee ...
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Peter Gross ...
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Freddie Jackson ...
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Steve Kelly ...
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Denny McLain ...
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Bruce McNall ...
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Jeffrey Osborne ...
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Valery Pappas ...
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Billy Joe Royal ...
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Barry Steiger ...
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Joseph Wapner ...
 Himself (2 episodes, 1989)
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 Herself (2 episodes, 1989)
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Storyline

After Pat's other show, "Wheel of Fortune" (1975) enjoyed a surge of popularity in the late 80's, he decided to try his hand at hosting a late-night talk show. The format was similar to "The Tonight Show" (1962), consisting of comedy monologues, celebrity guests and musical numbers. Although many well-known celebrities appeared on his show, in the end, Sajak was unable to compete with Johnny Carson and David Letterman. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Don't go to bed until you turn him on. See more »

Genres:

Talk-Show

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Release Date:

9 January 1989 (USA)  »

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Trivia

When he first complained about Sajak, Rod Perth had been the general manager of WBBM, the station CBS owned in Chicago. As soon as Sajak's ratings started their inexorable nosedive, Lucy Salhany, the head of Paramount Television, had called Perth in Chicago, telling him he had 24 hours to buy into the suddenly scalding-hot The Arsenio Hall Show (1989). WBBM had strong ties to Paramount, and Salhany was respecting those ties giving Perth first crack at Arsenio Hall in the Chicago market. Perth jumped at the chance, putting Arsenio on the air immediately after Sajak. Having a station that CBS owned snap up Hall only gave the restless CBS affiliates more reason to sign on for Arsenio themselves. But most of them used Hall to replace Sajak. By December 1989, more than fifty CBS stations made the switch, dooming Sajak even as they coronated Arsenio as the first truly viable challenger to The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962). See more »

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User Reviews

Another talk show disaster:Pat Sajak
12 October 2006 | by (Chapel Hill,North Carolina) – See all my reviews

Like a "Wheel Of Fortune" contestant attempting to buy "Y",the game-show host couldn't have been thinking too clearly when he accepted a gig as a late-night talk show host. What began as a 90-minute program when it premiered in 1989(the same year that The Arsenio Hall Show came onto the scene as well)on CBS within the first three months was reduced to an hour,but that didn't make it easier for the eternally grinning Pat Sajak to come up with compelling material. His interviewing skills as a late night talk show host were pathetic. He couldn't interview worth a damn. Having the audacity to try to unseat the king of late night-Johnny Carson,Sajak had the drapes,the spotlight,the band,and the couch but not the charisma. Because of this,CBS cancelled his show the following year. One of the few memorable episodes featured an interview with Robbie and Evel Knievel--the other was the one with Joan Rivers,who also had the audacity to unseat Johnny Carson too,but miserably fail.---This was so appropriate because the show itself was a disaster waiting to happen and the executives at CBS knew this too. After Pat Sajak's talk show was cancelled in 1990,CBS would have to wait another three and a half years before they finally hit payola in the competition for the late night talk show format,and they did in the fall of 1993,when they acquired David Letterman from NBC to CBS.

Before long,in 1990,the cancelled "Pat Sajak Show" was replaced by repeats of Jack Lord's crime drama series "Hawaii Five-O" and the Telly Savalas crime drama series "Kojak" along with repeated episodes of either "Columbo" or some other form of entertainment that replaced it for CBS Late Night. Pat Sajak returned to do what he did best-host a game show and this was something he knew how to do,brilliantly and successfully.


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