Who Framed Roger Rabbit
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Given that Donald Duck's speech often sounds garbled, a rumor has circulated for many years that Donald seems to say something rather unpleasant to Daffy, in response to Daffy's line, "I've worked with a lot of wise-quackers, but you are despicable." What Donald actually says is: "Doggone, stubborn little...That did it! Quaaak!" The line is very similar to what he mutters in the old Disney shorts, especially when faced with obstacles such as his nephews, or Chip & Dale.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Judge Doom.

Frank Marshall had this to say:


It came pretty close. We shot a test. We had a script. But unfortunately, we didn't have computer generated animation quite yet. It was just too expensive If you think about it. In the original movie there's really only 48 minutes of animation and in the new movie - or in that movie - he was in everything. So it went from 48 minutes of animation to over 100 minutes of animation.

I remember we shot the test to try and see how much we could do with digital props. We weren't even into digital characters yet. The idea was to see what we could do with digital props as opposed to what we did in the original movie where everything was puppeted. All the props were puppeted by strings and wires and poles.
For the first time ever, Marshall also revealed details of the plot of Roger Rabbit 2.

New York! Roger was a song and dance man in New York City [when he] discovered that he wanted to be in the movies and so he came across the country. I remember there being a big dance number. He came out with a troupe of sort of Busby Berkeley dancers on a train and they got to Hollywood and he and Baby Herman moved in together. And that's when he met Eddie Valiant.
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In the history of the company, Disney employees have always found creative ways to hide little gags in their works. There is, for example the "Hidden Mickeys"-phenomenon where they like to insert the silhouette of Mickey Mouse into other films. On the other hand, some artist show a more libertine attitude in the way they embed their humour in films. Just have a look at the phallus-shaped towers on the film poster of "The Little Mermaid" or the word "SFX" written on a starry sky in "The Lion King".

In 1988, the animators of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" had some funnier ideas. In one scene Baby Herman leaves the set and very shortly extends his finger as he passes under an employee's dress plus the infamous Jessica Rabbit upskirt scene. However, for the later home entertainment versions, the film was edited several times. The worldwide-released DVD version was edited and censored again. A detailed comparison between both versions with pictures can be found here.

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