Tonari no Totoro
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News for
My Neighbor Totoro (1988) More at IMDbPro »Tonari no Totoro (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

17 items from 2016


Studio Ghibli: Watch A Two-Hour Concert Of Their Greatest Film Scores Conducted by Joe Hisaishi

20 July 2016 10:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Since 1985, the Japanese animation studio Studio Ghibli is known for producing some of the most critically acclaimed, highest-quality animated films. Their output includes the films of Hayao Miyazaki, whose films like “My Neighbor Totoro” and “Spirited Away” have entered the cultural consciousness, as well as work by director Isao Takahta, whose most recent film “The Tale of the Princess Kaguya” was recently nominated for an Oscar. Studio Ghibli’s dedicated approach towards their craft promises the best in animation, but one element of their films that goes largely unnoticed are their scores.

Read More: Cannes Review: Studio Ghibli-Produced ‘The Red Turtle’ is a Quiet Little Masterpiece

In 2009, Joe Hisaishi, composer of a majority of Ghibli films, held a concert to celebrate the release of Miyazaki’s “Ponyo” and the 25 years of collaboration between the two ever since 1984’s “Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind,” whose success led to the creation of Ghibli. »

- Kyle Kizu

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Studio Ghibli Animator Makiko Futaki: A Tribute

24 June 2016 3:10 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After Studio Ghibli veteran Makiko Futaki died in May, Pixar’s animator-director Peter Sohn (“The Good Dinosaur”) agreed to write a tribute and discovered a personal style in re-examining her work.

Makiko Futaki lived a life of animation. She worked on films from Katsuhiro Otomo’s “Akira” to Hayao Miyazaki’s “Howl’s Moving Castle.”

To be honest, I did not know her work until I had heard of her unfortunate passing in May at the young age of 57. Her list of film credits were jaw dropping. She had injected her talent into many of the greatest films of all time.

Animation can be an invisible art form because it is so collaborative. It is sometimes hard to discern which animator animated what scene in a particular film, but after watching several films an animator drew moments for, one can begin to see a personal style.

In Miyazaki’s “Laputa, »

- Bill Desowitz

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Review: 'The Neon Demon' offers sleek and sexy scares with a satirical twist

23 June 2016 6:45 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

There are, in every generation of filmmakers, certain archetypes that repeat themselves over and over. For example, every generation has its playful prankster, the talented visual artists who are delighted by their own ability to take beautiful pictures of horrible things. I’ll be the first to admit that I am drawn to filmmakers who use cinema as a way of pushing buttons, and I am a fan of the outrageous and the extreme. When I saw De Palma, the new documentary about Brian De Palma and his filmography, it sent me scrambling to watch a number of his older films again. They are so familiar at this point, so well-worn, that it surprised me to see how new they still feel when I took a step back. The next day, I went to a screening of the latest film from Nicolas Winding Refn, and the back-to-back timing of the two films made me laugh. »

- Drew McWeeny

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Only Trust the Image: Dubbing, Translation, and the Language of Cinema

16 June 2016 10:42 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

While cinema is moving pictures, language and dialogue play an essential role in the unfolding of most films. Dialogue is used to reveal character, plot, and exposition. It can be used as a masking device or as clear explanation. But what happens when dialogue is translated to another language? The image remains the same, but the voices or words change. Is authenticity lost, or is laziness in translation the prime issue?

This video essay by Fandor Keyframe delves into the odd practice of dubbing and subtitling, where more often than not, liberties are taken. In an example from Stalker, the English dub replaces the Russian dialogue with a vocal delivery that sounds more akin to a science audiobook than a film performance. Similarly, an example from Belle du Jour shows complete changes to dialogue between the original French writing and the English dub (“the scent of decay?”).

Of particular interest is the essayists conviction that animation is easier to accept when translated than live action. He ruminates on why this is with an example from My Neighbor Totoro, with no concrete answer. One conclusion he does arrive at is this: the only thing in cinema you can trust is the image.

Watch the full essay below, including examples from Aguirre: Wrath of God, The Blue Angel, and of course, Lost in Translation.

»

- The Film Stage

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Movie Review – When Marnie Was There (2014)

8 June 2016 10:10 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

When Marnie Was There, 2014.

Directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi.

Featuring the voice talents of Sara TakatsukiKasumi Arimura and Hana Sugisaki (Japanese)/Hailee Steinfield, John C. Reilly and Geena Davis (English).

 

Synopsis:

A troubled teen finds peace in a beach-side town and a mysterious new friend, Marnie…

Studio Ghibli likes to take us on a journey. Whether we are moving house in My Neighbour Totoro or seeing the surreal world of Spirited Away, the experience is always unforgettable. When Marnie Was There, the latest Ghibli release, carries us a little closer to home than the more playful exploits we’ve experienced, but it weaves a personal and meaningful tale of family, friendship and those tricky teenage years into the mix. Instinctively, the use of the name ‘Marnie’ sends me to Hitchcock. Indeed, When Marnie Was There shares an intriguing investigative key (and a tall silo not unlike the bell tower) that »

- Simon Columb

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Match the Studio Ghibli screenshot to the movie – quiz

7 June 2016 2:33 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

It might be Studio Ghibli’s last film so with the release of When Marnie Was There, here’s the ultimate test. How many of their classics can you recognise?

Spirited Away

Princess Mononoke

The Cat Returns

Ponyo

My Neighbour Totoro

Only Yesterday

The Wind Rises

Pom Poko

Porco Rosso

Grave of the Fireflies

Tales from Earthsea

The Secret World of Arriety

My Neighbours the Yamadas

The Wind Rises

Kiki's Delivery Service

Princess Mononoke

Howl's Moving Castle

Castle in the Sky

Spirited Away

Only Yesterday

From Up on Poppy Hill

The Cat Returns

Ponyo

The Secret World of Arriety

My Neighbours the Yamadas

Pom Poko

Porco Rosso

Tales From Earthsea

My Neighbour Totoro

From Up On Poppy Hill

The Wind Rises

Whisper of the Heart

Castle in the Sky

Whisper of the Heart

Ponyo

Princess Mononoke

Pom Poko

Grave of the Fireflies

Only Yesterday

Kiki's Delivery Service

7 and above.

Lovely Ghibli! »

- Benjamin Lee

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Studio Ghibli Veteran Animator Makiko Futaki Dies at 57

29 May 2016 9:35 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The animation world has lost a prodigious talent with the death of Makiko Futaki, a longtime Studio Ghibli animator who passed away on May 13 after an unspecified illness. Futaki collaborated on every one of Hayao Miyazaki's films, several of which are regarded as high-water marks of the entire genre: "My Neighbor Totoro," "Princess Mononoke," "Spirited Away" and many others. Futaki was 57 at the time of her passing. Read More: 'The Red Turtle' Trailer: Studio Ghibli Returns With A Mesmerizing Silent Film In addition to her work at Ghibli, which has been among the world's most foremost animation studios for decades, Futaki also served as key animator on 1988's "Akira." Katsuhiro Otomo's dystopian sci-fi anime is likewise considered among the best of its kind ever made. Futaki held the same credit on such films as "Howl's Moving Castle," "From Up on Poppy Hill" and "The Wind Rises." Read More: Watch: A Feminist. »

- Michael Nordine

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Kiki’s Delivery Service review – lovable Studio Ghibli coming-of-age story

26 May 2016 9:15 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This sunny 1989 fantasy by master animator Hayao Miyazaki broaches the issue of female sexuality more boldly than any Western children’s movie would dare

A lovable 1989 anime from Japanese master Hayao Miyazaki, part of the Studio Ghibli Forever season. Like his classic My Neighbour Totoro, this seamlessly works elements of fantasy and mild crises into an everyday children’s story, though this one serves more as a primer for womanhood. Kiki is a young witch – a profession that carries no sinister associations. Having reached the age of 13, tradition dictates that she must fly the nest on a sort of witchy gap year. Accompanied by her sardonic cat Jiji, and with a shaky grip of broomstick aviation, she winds up lodging with a kindly baker, for whom she begins an airborne delivery service.

The plot is so loose as to barely exist, but beneath its sunny, colour-saturated, beautifully animated surface, the »

- Steve Rose

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Sony Pictures Classics acquires animation 'The Red Turtle'

19 May 2016 8:46 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Animation co-produced by Wild Bunch and Studio Ghibli premiered at Cannes in Un Certain Regard.

Sony Pictures Classics has acquired all rights in North America and Latin America to Michael Dudok de Wit animation The Red Turtle. 

The film premiered yesterday in Un Certain Regard at Cannes Film Festival.  As previously announced, Spc has acquired Cannes Competition titles Paul Verhoeven’s Elle and Maren Ade’s Toni Erdmann.

The Red Turtle is produced by Wild Bunch and Studio Ghibli - the first European co-pro with the Japanese animation studio behind My Neighbour Totoro and Spirited Away - in association with Why Not Productions.  

The deal was negotiated by Carole Baraton on behalf of Wild Bunch and Sony Pictures Classics

The film recounts the milestones in the life of a human being through the story of a man shipwrecked on a tropical island inhabited by turtles, crabs and birds.

“The Red Turtle takes you on an ultimate journey »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Inside the Greatest X-Rated Animated Film You've Never Heard Of

11 May 2016 9:36 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

At the 1973 Berlin Film Festival, overenthusiastic parents, eager to take their kids to a "family-friendly" animated film, crowded into a German theater for a recently released Japanese anime film with an unusual title: Belladonna of Sadness. They expected something that might distract their kids for 90 minutes, a sort of proto-My Neighbor Totoro; instead, they were treated to an opening scene that climaxes with a brutal prima nocta gang rape, a devil disguised as an impish phallus worming his way between the heroine's legs and, in between surreal orgy scenes, »

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Studio Ghibli Forever season running through to July

1 May 2016 5:53 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

StudioCanal is celebrating the work of the legendary Academy Award-winning anime house Studio Ghibli with a respective season running through to July 28th, showcasing the very best of the Japanese animation powerhouse.

The season features Ghibli’s classics such as My Neighbour Totoro, Howl’s Moving Castle, Kiki’s Delivery Service, Grave of the Fireflies and Spirited Away, as well as a brand new English re-dub of Only Yesterday, and the theatrical release of the latest release When Marnie Was There, which hits UK cinemas on June 10th.

Check out a trailer for the season here…

For more details and to book your tickets, visit the official site here.

»

- Gary Collinson

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Today in Movie Culture: 'My Neighbor Totoro' Theme Park Ride, Stoner Movie Tributes and More

20 April 2016 11:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Dream Theme Park Attraction of the Day: Disney theme park designer John Ramirez came up with this idea for a My Neighbor Totoro attraction, which sadly will never exist (via Geekologie):   Fandom Splurge of the Day: Star Wars fans rented a billboard to make a plea to Disney and Lucasfilm to resurrect the Expanded Universe (via JoBlo.com):   Animated Recap of the Day: If you don't have time to see all of Hardcore Henry at the theater, here's a 60-second animated version that goes for a side-scrolling game style rather than Pov shooter (via Geek Tyrant):   Cosplay of the Day: The Jones family (aka cosplayer Coregeek's family...

Read More

»

- Christopher Campbell

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NYC Weekend Watch: Kung Fu, Sidney Poitier, The Maysles, Chantal Akerman & More

7 April 2016 7:44 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The “Old School Kung Fu Fest” comes to the Lower East Side this weekend, offering the likes of Sammo Hung, Jackie Chan, Bruce Lee, and Tsui Hark, among others.

A print of My Neighbor Totoro screens on Saturday morning.

Frederick Wiseman‘s Hospital begins a week-long run.

A restoration of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari screens this Monday. »

- Nick Newman

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Watch: 9-Minute Video Essay Details Hayao Miyazaki's Decades-Long Journey To Bring 'Princess Mononoke' To Life

15 March 2016 2:43 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Trying to decide which Studio Ghibli movie is the most beautiful is a losing battle, but The Film Theorist make a convincing case for why “Princess Mononoke,” the studio’s labor-of-love 1997 historical action-fantasy epic, might take the prize. Director and Ghibli grandmaster Hayao Miyazaki’s inspiration for the fable began in the late '70s, towards the beginning of his lavish career in the director’s chair, before he would ever get the courage or insistence to follow through on the grandiose vision that swam inside his head for nearly two decades. But initial concepts, designs, characters and story elements wound up making their way into 1988’s “My Neighbor Totoro” instead — what I’d consider the Japanese’s studio highest achievement — and this video, appropriately titled “Princess Mononoke: Decades of Struggle,” digs into how the animation master house would eventually bring their director’s most lavish vision onto the big screen. »

- Will Ashton

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10 Cloverfield Lane: 9 Easter Eggs, In-Jokes And References

15 March 2016 2:38 PM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Paramount Pictures/Valve/Studio Ghibli

Because of that title, when you go watch 10 Cloverfield Lane you’re going in for one specific reason – you want to crack the mystery. How is this connected to the 2008 found footage monster flick? Why has J.J. Abrams kept it so secret? Why is Mary Elizabeth Winstead not in more things?

I’m not going to answer these questions for you, because that’s what the movie’s there for. What I am going to instead, however, is take a look at the other cool things hidden in the film; the things it’s easy to miss as you get side-tracked by the mystery (which has been expertly pushed by the marketing). There’s winks to other films, subtle cameos from major actors and, yes, some little links between Cloverfield.

 

9. My Neighbour Totoro Toy Studio Ghibli

We learn very little about Michelle (Mary Elizabeth Winstead »

- Alex Leadbeater

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NYC Weekend Watch: Bowie, Shakespeare, Ghibli, ‘How Green Was My Valley’ & More

15 January 2016 8:10 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

In honor of David Bowie, Nagisa Oshima‘s Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (on 35mm) and Nicolas Roeg‘s The Man Who Fell to Earth will screen for free on Friday.

Film Forum

“Stratford on Houston” bring the Bard to New York, with Richard III, Welles‘ and Polanski‘s Macbeth, The Taming of the Shrew, »

- Nick Newman

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NYC Weekend Watch: Miyazaki, Welles, Mizoguchi & More

7 January 2016 9:08 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

IFC Center

For the Studio Ghibli retrospective, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind will screen on 35mm at midnight this Friday, alongside My Neighbor Totoro. Princess Mononoke can be seen at midnight on Saturday, and Only Yesterday plays throughout the weekend.

Alien, Fight Club, and an archival print of Horror of Dracula screen at midnight. »

- Nick Newman

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

17 items from 2016


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