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The Thin Blue Line (1988) Poster

Trivia

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Was rejected by the Oscars for Best Documentary category in 1989 because it was considered to be a fictional film due to its scripted content.
Errol Morris spent 2-1/2 years tracking down the various players in the Randall Adams case and convincing them to appear in the film.
Was chosen by "Entertainment Weekly' magazine as one of the "100 New Classics" ranking as #74 in the June 20, 2008 issue. The issue ranked the greatest movies of the previous 25 years.
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While marketing the film Harvey Weinstein, head of Miramax Films,, declared, "Never has Miramax had a movie where a man's life hangs in the balance".
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When Morrisfirst attempted to film Randall Adams, he was suspicious and nervous and stopped talking several times. Morris urged him to continue, saying, "Look, I really believe you're innocent; this is your only chance." According to Morris' account, " So then the cameraman take me aside and tells me I'm debased, and that this is the most disgusting thing he's ever seen in his entire life, and that he will not be a party to it anymore. That I make him sick. And I tell him if I want a moral philosopher, I would hire Emmanuel Kant.
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In 2008, "Variety" credited the film as "the most political work of cinema in the last 20 years".
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Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

In light of the new evidence uncovered by the film, an evidentiary hearing was held. David Harris testified, recanting his earlier testimony against Randall Adams. "Randall Adams knew nothing about this offense and was not in the car at the time," Harris testified. Adams' capital murder verdict was overturned, and he was released from prison in March 1989. Adams then filed suit against filmmaker Errol Morris over the rights to his life.
On June 30, 2004, David Harris was executed by lethal injection in Huntsville, TX, for murdering Mark Mays during an attempted kidnapping. Harris was 43. That crime occurred September 1, 1985, and was unrelated to Harris' murder of the police officer discussed in this film. The film mentions the Mays case; Harris was wounded in the neck before the victim was killed.
Despite being wrongly imprisoned for 12 years, Randall Adams received no payment from the state of Texas.
In the final scene, in which there are shots of a tape recorder appear from various angles, was made the way it is because Errol Morris' camera broke down on the day of the interview.

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