7.1/10
64
1 user 1 critic

Talking to Strangers (1988)

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3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Ken Gruz ...
Jesse
Marvin Hunter ...
General
...
Red Coat
Caron Tate ...
Ms. Taylor
Brian Costantini ...
Angry Man
Bill Sanders ...
Manager
...
Priest
Lois Evans ...
Water Taxi People
Richard Foster ...
Slick
Linda Chambers ...
Trigger
...
Potter
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Joanne Bauer ...
Water Taxi
Laurie Nettles ...
Water Taxi
Sherrie Valero ...
Water Taxi

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independent film | See All (1) »

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27 December 1991 (USA)  »

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Edited into Histoire(s) du cinéma: Seul le cinéma (1994) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Worth a look
29 June 2004 | by (B-Town) – See all my reviews

"Talking to Strangers" is a unique film consisting of nine incidents each told in a single continuous take on a single roll of film. The only link between the segments is the presence of actor Ken Gruz, a somewhat slight but nonetheless likable performer. Technically-speaking, this low-budget film shot in Baltimore, Maryland, is nothing short of a tour de force. Writer/Director Rob Tregenza moves his camera with smooth and assured inventiveness. However, the narrative structure, and I use that term loosely, leaves something to be desired. If there is a thematic or narrative connection between the individuals segments, I must confess it was completely lost on me. That said, some of the segments were very interesting. My favorite was the scene between Ken Gruz and a priest played by Henry Strozier. However, some of the segments reeked of self- indulgence for its own sake, particularly the final one with Mr. Gruz painting a studio. Still I must give this film its due as a stylistic precursor to what Richard Linklater later accomplished more successfully in "Slacker."


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