Anna and her slacker boyfriend go to work for the creepy, reclusive Joseph Rorret, who's just opened a movie theater that plays only classic English-language thrillers. Rorret obsessively ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Joseph Rorret
...
Barbara
Massimo Venturiello ...
Carlo
Enrica Rosso ...
Sara
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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The Casting Director
Raffaella Baracchi ...
Ragazza violentata
Roberto Cavosi ...
Keir Dullea
Roxana Cox ...
Sheila (as Rossana Coggiola)
Alberto Crisciotti
Alessandro Fontana ...
Robert Walker
Claudia Giannotti ...
Mother of Sheila
Roberto Mancini ...
Farley Granger
Marco Marelli
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Moira Shearer / Deborah Kerr
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Storyline

Anna and her slacker boyfriend go to work for the creepy, reclusive Joseph Rorret, who's just opened a movie theater that plays only classic English-language thrillers. Rorret obsessively spies on the audiences in his theater, savoring the fearful reactions of pretty women, then later tracking them down, dating and murdering them. As Anna fearfully investigates his sinister doings, one of Rorret's intended victims turns out to be a little stranger even than him.... Written by Anne Sharp <sharpa@lcm.macomb.lib.mi.us>

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movie reality crossover | See All (1) »

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Thriller

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Release Date:

8 February 1989 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ad altezza uomo  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Probably too artsy...
19 June 2001 | by (Zürich, Switzerland) – See all my reviews

This rather unknown Italian film is an odd thing. On the one hand, it's a beautiful homage to the Film Noir genre, and the two thriller classics "Psycho" and "Peeping Tom" especially. The film almost oozes its love for these movies, there are the best known moments of those movies restaged almost frame by frame in film-in-film sequences. "Psycho"'s shower scene, for example, is shown in a film called "Blood in the Shower" (sic!). Jean Sorel is extremely convincing as the murderous theatre-owner Joseph Rorret, and the stylish direction also adds to the flair. But...

On the other hand, "Rorret" is rather a drama than a Film Noir or a thriller

  • although it undoubtedly includes typical Giallo elements. Problem is that


Fulvio Wetzl's direction sometimes looks über-stylish. It's often too film-school-like, it seems that he wants to show his love for the movies too clearly using the style of them how one learns about it at film-schools - therefore "Rorret" is probably too artsy.

A big plus is the musical score: While most Italian scores of the late 1980s are pure synthesizer sound, this one boosts almost old-fashioned guitar music that fits perfectly. Which brings me to another point: "Rorret" makes the impression of being anachronistic. It's almost too subtle for its production year.

All in all, "Rorret" is a unique and interesting film - but with a more modern and direct approach, it would have been an instant cult classic. Therefore it's a wasted opportunity in a way. And that's a pity.


3 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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