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Sony Executives Eric Fineman, Dan Kagan Leaving Studio (Exclusive)

Sony Pictures executives Eric Fineman and Dan Kagan are leaving the Culver City studio, Variety has learned.

Fineman will become a producer at Amy Pascal’s Pascal Pictures, working on both films and television projects. He served as Sony’s vice president of production. Pascal’s new shingle is on the Sony lot.

Kagan has been poached by Orion Pictures, the newly relaunched Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer label. Orion had been associated with ’80s and ’90s hits such as “Dances With Wolves,” “The Silence of the Lambs,” and “Married to the Mob.” It will be a standalone theatrical marketing and distribution company. At Sony, Kagan was director of development.

Kagan and Fineman’s exits aren’t the only recent executive departures. Paramount hired Lumumba Mosquera to become executive vice president of business affairs. He’s primary responsibility for Paramount Players, the newly created film division headed by Brian Robbins, the founder of AwesomenessTV.

Sony
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Melvin and Howard’ and the Good Samaritan Nature of Jonathan Demme

Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat) is a gambler of sorts, but that is intrinsic to the life of a lower-middle class American. He lives in a trailer, has an estranged wife (Mary Steenburgen, in an Oscar-winning performance), and drives a beaten-up truck whose paint job can only be described as “dirt on rust.” He’s the living epitome of a country music song where a man works 9 to 5 every day only to come home and scratch off lottery tickets in the dream of living in a more prosperous genre of music. Melvin is a bit of a singer as well, and prides himself on his Christmas jingle that he’s sure is going to be a hit someday, cutely titled “Santa’s Souped-up Sleigh.” Melvin debuts the song to a haggard crypt-keeper of a man (Jason Robards) he picked up off the road. Melvin infectiously sings the song, insisting that
See full article at The Film Stage »

Paul Thomas Anderson Shares 5 Reasons Why Jonathan Demme Was His Favorite Filmmaker

  • Indiewire
Paul Thomas Anderson Shares 5 Reasons Why Jonathan Demme Was His Favorite Filmmaker
Programmers at Brooklyn’s BAMcinématek had already been planning Jonathan Demme month when news of his death broke, the comprehensive retrospective of one of American cinema’s most influential voices took on new meaning in the wake of his passing — and brought some of his disciples out of the woodwork. These included Paul Thomas Anderson, who moderated a series of conversations throughout the program’s opening weekend.

The series kicked off with the 1986 slapdash comedy and road movie “Something Wild,” and Anderson was on hand to interview the film’s producer Ed Saxon and SXSW founder Louis Black, a longtime friend of the late director. But it was Anderson, who’s currently in post-production on his December release “Phantom Thread,” who naturally consumed the spotlight. “This is so thrilling for me, and nerve-wracking to be here,” he said by way of introduction, calling himself the “master of ceremony for the weekend.
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Punch-Drunk Love,’ ‘Free Fire,’ ‘The Salesman,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Best in Show (Christopher Guest)

Christopher Guest has had an exceptionally strong ’00s with A Mighty Wind and For Your Consideration, and it remains to be seen how his upcoming Mascots will be received, but his arguable peak is still the gloriously funny mockumentary Best in Show. Guest’s other films have lovingly skewered egotistical oddballs and the insanity of subjective or objective criticism, so Best in Show is
See full article at The Film Stage »

Married To The Mob June 24th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

“I feel like a virgin at a eunuch convention.”

Married To The Mob screens Friday, June 24th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the sixth film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

In director Jonathan Demme’s 1988 comedy Married To The Mob, Michelle Pfeiffer stars as Angela Demarco, the widow of a recently “iced” Mob hit-man who moves from her garishly tacky Long Island home to start a new life for herself and her son, while being pursued by Mob boss Dean Stockwell and FBI man Matthew Modine. Married To The Mob has lots going for it including a very amusing script; offbeat characters; sudden sharp turns to unexpected violence, and a hilarious yet menacing, Oscar-nominated performance by Stockwell and and also by Mercedes Ruehl, as his jealous wife from hell, But Ms Pfeiffer steals the show easily. She perfectly nails Angela’s under-educated,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Something Wild June 23rd at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

“You were right. I’m a rebel. I am! I just channeled my rebellion into the mainstream.”

Something Wild screens Friday, June 23rd at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the fifth film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Director Jonathan Demme’s Something Wild (1986) more than lives up to its title. This rolicking, road trip melodrama about coincidences and happenstances features a slippery-fingered bohemian babe, a staid businessman, and a psychotic criminal on the lam. Charlie Driggs (Jeff Daniels) neglects to pay his bill one day, and a complete stranger, Lulu (Melanie Griffith) confronts him about it outside of the restaurant. Afterward, Lulu takes the hopelessly conventional Charlie on a wild ride that concludes with her handcuffing him to a bed in a sleazy motel and tearing off his clothes. Impulse prompts them to careen off with Charlie still wearing the cuffs.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Bruce MacCallum, Camera Operator, Dies at 70

Bruce MacCallum, Camera Operator, Dies at 70
Bruce MacCallum, a camera operator on films including “Silence of the Lambs” and a longtime union activist, died Monday in Los Angeles. He was 70.

MacCallum started out in entertainment as an assistant to Dustin Hoffman, then moved into the camera department and worked on films including “Raging Bull,” “Married to the Mob,””All that Jazz,” “Witness,” and “Heartburn” as assistant cameraman.

He went on to become camera operator on “School of Rock,” “The Departed,” “I Am Legend” and “The Adjustment Bureau.”

More recently he worked on TV shows including “The Night Of” and “The Blacklist” as well as the recent feature “The Book of Henry.”

MacCullum helped train and mentor many fellow members of the International Cinematographers Guild (Icg, Iatse Local 600), where he served as National Assistant Secretary-Treasurer between 2007 and 2016.

He is survived by Linda, his wife of 32 years.

Related storiesJodie Foster Writes Heartfelt Tribute to Jonathan DemmeJodie Foster Pays Tribute to Jonathan Demme,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Stop Making Sense June 17th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

“I wanna introduce the band by name!”

Stop Making Sense screens Saturday, June 17th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the fourth film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Stop Making Sense (1984) is an action-packed concert film… not in the sense of leaping towers of pyrotechnics… but in the way of seeing David Byrne falling back, standing up, shoving lamps, and running around risers, while musicians emerge song-by-song and various backgrounds come and go. Everything is in perfect place for this concert film directed by Jonathan Demme –and, even better, it’s nonstop. There are no minute-long, audience-panning breaks; if one song ends, the next one’s almost there. And, of course, there’s the music. See this one at Webster U and you’ll be treated to some wonderful tracks -from a spastic, minor-keyed “Psycho Killer” to a somehow strangely touching,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Melvin And Howard June 16th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

“No one seems to love or understand me. Oh what hard luck stories they all hand me”

Melvin And Howard screens Friday, June 16th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the third film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Paul Le Mat is an average Joe named Melvin E. Dummar in Melvin And Howard (1980) an effective combination of drama and comedy from director Jonathan Demme. Melvin often finds it difficult to make ends meet, no matter what line of work he’s in. Then, one day, it seems as if his luck might change. A stranger leaves on his desk a will proclaiming Melvin to be one of 16 heirs to the fortune of reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes. Once upon a time, Melvin had given a lift to an aged, decrepit looking individual (Jason Robards) who claimed to be Hughes. The
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Crazy Mama June 10th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

Crazy Mama screens Saturday, June 10th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the second film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

A band of beauty shop desperadoes cartoonishly plunder their way from California to Arkansas to reclaim the old family farm in the 1975 hillbilly masterpiece Crazy Mama directed by Jonathan Demme and produced by Roger Corman, who made a whole series of these backwoods desperadoes flicks in the ’70s.

Cloris Leachman stars as Melba Stokes, who runs a beauty parlor in Long Beach, California with her mother Sheba (Ann Sothern) and her daughter Cheryl (Linda Purl). When the shop is repossessed by banker Jim Backus (aka Thurston Howell III in a great little cameo) Melba and the ladies head back to Arkansas and the family farm which was stolen away from them when shea was a girl. Along for the ride is Cheryl’s boyfriend,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Caged Heat Kicks off ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ June 9th at Webster University

“Even for criminals you’re just a particularly poor reflection on womanhood.”

Caged Heat screens Friday, June 9th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the first film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Who doesn’t love a good Women’s prison film? – Chained Heat, Hellhole, Ilsa She Wolf Of The SS, The Big Bird Cage, The Big Doll House, Reform School Girls, and The Concrete Jungle all sit proudly on my Wip (Women in Prison) DVD shelf. One of the very best of this beloved subgenre is Caged Heat (1974), a wonderful exploitation masterpiece and the directing debut of Oscar-winner Jonathan Demme, that has everything you could possibly hope for in a Women-In-Prison movie: nudity, shower catfights, lesbian coupling, race wars, murder, chain-swinging, switch-blade slashing, and shock therapy!

Chained Heat stars Erica Gavin (of Russ Meyer’s Vixen fame) as Jackie,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Jonathan Demme

Chicago – The impact that director Jonathan Demme had on the last couple generations of cinema will live beyond his passing last week, at the age of 73. The Oscar-winning filmmaker also made an impact with the film writers of HollywoodChicago.com – Jon Espino, Patrick McDonald and Spike Walters.

Director Jonathan Demme on the Set of ‘The Silence of the Lambs

Photo credit: 20 Century Fox Home Entertainment

The director was described as “the last of the great humanists” in the HollywoodChicago.com obituary, and followed through on that description with an incredible run of films in the 1980s and ‘90s, which included “Melvin and Howard” (1980), “Something Wild” (1986), “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987), “Married to the Mob” (1988), “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991) and “Philadelphia” (1993). He also created one of the greatest rock documentaries ever, “Stop Making Sense” (1984, featuring the Talking Heads) and worked extensively with Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young on other rock docs. He
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Robyn Hitchcock Remembers Jonathan Demme: ‘He Was the Anti-Video-Generation Director’

Robyn Hitchcock Remembers Jonathan Demme: ‘He Was the Anti-Video-Generation Director’
Director Jonathan Demme, who died on Wednesday at age 73, may go down as the most rock-friendly major director of all time. His most famous association was with Talking Heads, thanks to the boon to both their careers that was “Stop Making Sense.” But he also enjoyed long friendships and/or working relationships with everyone from Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young to cult bands like The Feelies. And arguably the most peculiar documentary in a filmography full of peculiar documentaries is “Storefront Hitchcock,” a concert film that had the amiably surreal British singer/songwriter Robyn Hitchcock playing an acoustic gig with his back to a shop window, competing for the viewer’s attention with mostly unaware passersby.

Demme never stopped dragging his favorite people into his movies, so Hitchcock subsequently showed up in “The Manchurian Candidate” and “Rachel Getting Married,” on top of being asked to contribute songs for other films.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Great Job, Internet!: The story behind the revolutionary slogan Jonathan Demme hid in his movies

  • The AV Club
Most great directors have their quirky trademarks, but few are as esoteric as “A Luta Continua,” the Portuguese-language political slogan that appears at the very end of the credits of four movies directed by the late Jonathan Demme: Something Wild, Married To The Mob, Silence Of The Lambs, and Philadelphia. To the few who sit all the way through the credits, the phrase probably looks like little more than behind-the-scenes gobbledygook, right up there with the International Alliance Of Theatrical Stage Employees labor union logo, the legal disclaimers, and the MPAA registration. And even that tiny minority of viewers that recognizes the reference would be baffled, because “A Luta Continua” (“The Struggle Continues”) was the slogan of the independence movement in Mozambique. What’s it doing in the end credits of a bunch of American movies? And what’s that little figure next to it?

“A Luta Continua” at
See full article at The AV Club »

Film News: Oscar-Winning Director Jonathan Demme Dies at 73

New York City – He was the helmsman of “The Silence of the Lambs,” which won him Best Director and took home Best Picture at the 1992 Academy Awards, and made numerous other late 20th Century movie classics. Director Jonathan Demme died in New York City on April 26, 2017, at the age of 73.

Film writer Dave Kehr called Demme “the last of the great humanists,” and the director followed through on that description with an incredible run of films in the 1980s and ‘90s, which included “Melvin and Howard” (1980), “Something Wild” (1986), “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987), “Married to the Mob” (1988), “Lambs” (1991) and “Philadelphia” (1993). He also created one of the greatest rock documentaries ever, “Stop Making Sense” (1984, featuring the Talking Heads) and worked extensively with Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young on other rock docs. He even directed an episode of the TV classic “Columbo” in 1978, among his other TV achievements.

Director Jonathan Demme on the Set
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

How Will Film Critics Remember Jonathan Demme? — Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
How Will Film Critics Remember Jonathan Demme? — Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can typically be found at the end of this post.) This week, however, in light of Jonathan Demme’s death — and in reaction to the immense outpouring of love for the man and his movies that followed the news of his passing — we’ve decided to switch things up with a special mid-week edition of our usual survey.

We asked our panel one simple question: How will you remember Jonathan Demme? The responses we received can be found below.

Mallory Andrews (@mallory_andrews) cléo

Though I only saw “Something Wild” for the first time this month, it somehow feels like it’s been with me for my entire filmgoing life. The scene where (my ideal man
See full article at Indiewire »

Jodie Foster Shares Touching Tribute to Late Director Jonathan Demme: 'He Was Pure Energy'

Jodie Foster Shares Touching Tribute to Late Director Jonathan Demme: 'He Was Pure Energy'
Jodie Foster is paying tribute to legendary director Jonathan Demme following his death on Wednesday.

The actress released a touching statement to media outlets mourning the loss of the groundbreaking filmmaker, and celebrating his impressive life and legacy.

Watch: Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs' and 'Philadelphia' Director, Dies at 73

"I am heart-broken to lose a friend, a mentor, a guy so singular and dynamic you’d have to design a hurricane to contain him," Foster shared. "Jonathan was as quirky as his comedies and as deep as his dramas. He was pure energy, the unstoppable cheerleader for anyone creative. Just as passionate about music as he was about art, he was and will always be a champion of the soul."

"[He was] most beloved, something wild, brother of love, director of the lambs," she continued. "Love that guy. Love him so much."

Foster delivered one of her career-defining performances as rookie FBI Agent Clarice Starling
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Talking Heads Frontman David Byrne Pens Touching Tribute to Jonathan Demme

Talking Heads Frontman David Byrne Pens Touching Tribute to Jonathan Demme
David Byrne paid tribute to Jonathan Demme in a lengthy letter posted Wednesday on his website after the Academy Award-winning director died at the age of 73.

The Talking Heads lead singer and guitarist recounted his experiences with Demme filming the footage that would eventually be turned into “Stop Making Sense,” a now-iconic concert doc shot at Hollywood’s Pantages Theatre. Byrne highlighted how Demme was able to think of the movie as a “theatrical ensemble piece” and reflected on his ability to make the band feel included.

Related

Justin Timberlake Remembers ‘Master of Humanity’ Jonathan Demme

“Jonathan was also incredibly generous during the editing and mixing,” he said. “That inclusion was hugely inspirational for me. Though I had directed music videos before, this mentoring of Jonathan’s emboldened me to try making a feature film.”

With few words to spare for Demme’s more successful films, such as “Silence of the Lambs” and “Philadelphia,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jonathan Demme, Oscar-Winning Director of 'The Silence of the Lambs', Has Passed Away at 73

  • Movies.com
Sad news today as Jonathan Demme, the Oscar-winning director of The Silence of the Lambs, has passed away at the age of 73 due to complications from esophageal cancer and heart disease. He is survived by his wife and three children. One glance at Demme's filmography and you'll see an incredibly versatile slate that ranged from B-movie roots, like his Roger Corman-produced directorial debut, Caged Heat, to comedy, like his 1988 hit Married to the Mob, to music, for his work with Bruce Springsteen over the years, to his dramas, like the Oscar-winning Philadelphia, and to his thrillers, like Silence of the Lambs, for which he won a Best Director Oscar. Demme was the kind of filmmaker who commanded whatever genre he was working in at the time, continually jumping...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Read David Byrne’s Touching Farewell Letter to Friend and ‘Stop Making Sense’ Director Jonathan Demme

  • Indiewire
Read David Byrne’s Touching Farewell Letter to Friend and ‘Stop Making Sense’ Director Jonathan Demme
The late filmmaker Jonathan Demme, who died last night at the age of 73, will always be linked to Talking Heads frontman David Byrne. The two likeminded artists first worked together on the 1984 classic “Stop Making Sense,” a concert documentary that Byrne hired Demme to direct, and that collaboration forever transformed what the world thinks possible of such performance-driven films. More than that, the experience sparked a lifelong friendship, one that extended into several other projects and irrevocably deepened the relationship between music and movies.

This afternoon, Byrne wrote a loving remembrance of Demme on his website. We have reposted the full text of Byrne’s letter below.

Read More: Remembering Jonathan Demme: Why He Was One Of The Great Filmmakers Of Our Time

My friend, the director Jonathan Demme, passed last night.

I met Jonathan in the ‘80s when Talking Heads were touring a show that he would eventually
See full article at Indiewire »
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