Hotaru no haka
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Grave of the Fireflies (1988) More at IMDbPro »Hotaru no haka (original title)


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2 items from 2017


‘My Life as a Zucchini’ Director Claude Barras on Tackling Taboos, Facing a Crisis, and His Favorite Animations

23 February 2017 1:13 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Premiering in the Directors’ Fortnight section at the Cannes Film Festival last year, Claude Barras‘ feature-length debut animation My Life as a Zucchini (aka My Life as a Courgette) is a deeply felt tale of the healing process through the eyes of an orphan. Ahead of its U.S. release this weekend, where it will also compete as a Best Animated Feature Film nominee at the Academy Awards, I had the opportunity to speak with Barras about crafting the animation.

We discussed his collaboration with Céline Sciamma (Girlhood) on the script, taking the perspective of a child, capturing taboo subjects, a crisis in production, his biggest animation influences, his Oscar nomination, and where he sees the future of his craft heading. Check out the full conversation below.

The Film Stage: Can you talk about the child perspective of this film — you don’t see the mother’s death and adult »

- Jordan Raup

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Why the future’s bright for anime

2 February 2017 9:09 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Feb 6, 2017

Beyond Studio Ghibli, a wave of directors and artists ensure that the future’s bright for animation in Japan, Ryan writes...

At its best, anime is diverse, vibrant, unfettered and unpredictable. Look through the history of Japanese animation, and you’ll find stories about baseball, cooking, friendly ghosts, ancient myths, dog detectives and robot cats from the future. You’ll find sci-fi and horror, fantasy and comedy, erotica and historical drama. Just about every country on the planet produces animation of some kind; few broach subjects as varied as the Japanese. 

See related  Katee Sackhoff interview: Battlestar, Haunting, Statham

In recent years, however, anime has faced threats from multiple angles. First, there’s the threat that will catch up with all of us eventually: time itself. In 2010, Japan lost one of its great storytellers, Satoshi Kon, who made such stunning animated movies as Perfect Blue (one of »

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2 items from 2017


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