Dekalog (1989–1990)
7.7/10
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11 user 20 critic

Dekalog, osiem 

"Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour". A Polish-American researcher visits Warsaw and attends a lecture about ethics. Afterwards, she approaches Zofia, the lecturer, and... See full summary »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Maria Koscialkowska ...
Zofia
...
Elzbieta
...
Young Man
...
Tailor
Wojciech Asinski
Marek Kepinski
Janusz Mond
Krzysztof Rojek
Wojciech Sanejko
Ewa Skibinska
Wojciech Starostecki ...
Student
...
Ksiadz
Jacek Strzemzalski
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Storyline

"Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour". A Polish-American researcher visits Warsaw and attends a lecture about ethics. Afterwards, she approaches Zofia, the lecturer, and says that she is the little Jewish girl whom Zofia refused to shelter during World War II. But Zofia has a very good reason for her apparent cowardice... Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>

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Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

22 June 1990 (Poland)  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$100,000 (estimated)
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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The ethical dilemma narrated by the student in Zofia's class is actually the plot of Decalogue II. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Simple and Terrific
11 March 2000 | by (New York, NY) – See all my reviews

With a minimum of histrionics, this film tells a simple story about the legacy of the holocaust in Poland.

A college professor who once turned away a little Jewish girl who sought refuge is confronted by that same girl -- now in her forties -- and must explain to her the real reason for turning her away. While the two women are able to forge a deep friendship, the man (a tailor) who risked his life to try and save the girl has become, with time, too closed off to allow her to form any sort of bond with him. The film's last image, of the lonely tailor looking out the window of his shop to see the professor and her friend laughing together, has the same straight forward and unassuming emotional wallop that ends many of Kieslowski's films.

This may be the best fictional film ever made about the holocaust.


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