Dekalog (1989–1990)
8.1/10
2,340
10 user 21 critic

Dekalog, siedem 

"Thou shalt not steal" - but in this case the 'theft' is of a child by her real mother, who then finds herself emotionally unable to cope with the responsibility, while the stable and ... See full summary »
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Ewa
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Majka
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Stefan
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Wojtek
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Ticket Woman
Katarzyna Piwowarczyk ...
Stefania Blonska
Miroslawa Maludzinska
Ewa Radzikowska
Wanda Wróblewska
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Storyline

"Thou shalt not steal" - but in this case the 'theft' is of a child by her real mother, who then finds herself emotionally unable to cope with the responsibility, while the stable and loving family that brought the child up are distraught. Written by Michael Brooke <michael@everyman.demon.co.uk>

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Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

15 June 1990 (Poland)  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Budget:

$100,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Connections

Referenced in The Simpsons: Lisa's First Word (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Thou shalt not steal
6 May 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Dekalog Seven isn't the strongest of the ten, but, like Dekalog Five, Kieslowski takes a fairly straightforward commandment and adds a twist to it. Sure, we may think Majka steal Ania, but, as Majka says, can you really steal something that was yours to begin with? It's an interesting question, and Kieslowski forces you to consider (And ultimately decide) who, Ewa or Majka, is really at fault for stealing Ania. But that's typical Kieslowski. To have a straightforward plot with a cut-and-dry scenario would be far too easy for him, and I've come to expect nothing less from his work. The types of questions he subtly asks the viewer are more important than any moral he could tell us because it forces us to question our own values and morals, instead of being told, and this kind of questioning is why Kieslowski and his works are so highly regarded.


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