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Who is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner? [Poll]

Who is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner? [Poll]
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) is a few weeks away from becoming one of 14 women who’ve won more than one Best Actress Oscar. McDormand, who took home the prize for “Fargo” (1996), would join 12 other women as two-time winners, two shy of Katharine Hepburn’s all-time record of four. Before McDormand joins this elite club, which of the first lucky 13 champs is your favorite?

Luise Rainer was the first actress to win two and the first performer to win back-to-back Oscars, triumphing for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937). Bette Davis (1935’s “Dangerous” and 1938’s “Jezebel”) joined her the following year. Eleven years later, Davis’ pal Olivia de Havilland won her second Oscar for 1949’s “The Heiress,” three years after her “To Each His Own” victory.

Two years after that, Vivien Leigh, who first took home the award for “Gone with the Wind” (1939), won for “A Streetcar Named Desire
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be 14th two-time Best Actress winner

Oscars 2018: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be 14th two-time Best Actress winner
No acting category at the Oscars has had more repeat winners than Best Actress, with 13 performers claiming two or more statues. Now Frances McDormand is in a strong position to add her name to that list for her performance in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” As of this writing McDormand leads our predictions with odds of 2/13 based on the combined forecasts of more than 3,400 users who have entered their picks at Gold Derby. If our predictions prove true, McDormand would join the following repeat champs:

Ingrid Bergman: “Gaslight” (1944) and “Anastasia” (1956)

Bette Davis: “Dangerous” (1935) and “Jezebel” (1938)

Olivia de Havilland: “To Each His Own” (1946) and “The Heiress” (1949)

Sally Field: “Norma Rae” (1979) and “Places in the Heart” (1984)

Jane Fonda: “Klute” (1971) and “Coming Home” (1978)

Jodie Foster: “The Accused” (1988) and “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991)

Katharine Hepburn: “Morning Glory” (1933), “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” (1967), “The Lion in Winter
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘A Cry in the Dark’: A look back at her eighth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘A Cry in the Dark’: A look back at her eighth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 8 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

When Meryl Streep first collaborated with filmmaker Fred Schepisi, reaction to their work was decidedly muted. “Plenty” (1985) came and went from theaters in no time, spending all of one week in the box office top 10. In 1987, both Streep and Schepisi had better luck, the former contending at the Academy Award for her turn in “Ironweed” and the latter directing the popular Steve Martin comedy “Roxanne.”

In 1988, Streep and Schepisi gave collaboration another shot. While “A Cry in the Dark,” adapted from John Bryson‘s book “Evil Angels” (1985), was hardly a crowd-pleaser, the picture and Streep’s performance garnered abundant critical acclaim. The film would mark
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1990s: Jessica Lange, Frances McDormand, Holly Hunter … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1990s: Jessica Lange, Frances McDormand, Holly Hunter … ? [Poll]
The Best Actress Oscar winners of the 1990s have all had long careers of success in Hollywood to varying degrees. From overdue actresses finally getting their first statue like Susan Sarandon to younger talent like Gwyneth Paltrow, the decade is full of diverse performances. Now, two decades later, which do you think holds up as the top Best Actress performance of the ’90s?

Take a look back on each winning performance and make sure to vote in our poll at the bottom. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actress.)

Kathy Bates, “Misery” (1990) — Kathy Bates in “Misery” is a great example of an actress breaking through in an unconventional way. Playing Annie Wilkes, deranged fan of an author who tortures him mercilessly, Bates became one of few actresses to win for a pure horror movie. She would later earn supporting nominations for “Primary Colors” (1998) and “About Schmidt” (2002).

SEEOscar snub explained: Did ‘Three
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2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins

2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins
After victories at the Golden Globes, Critics’ Choice and Screen Actors Guild Awards, Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) is the odds-on favorite to join a select group of women: performers who’ve won at least two Best Actress Oscars. McDormand would be the 14th to do so and perhaps most impressively, her double would be the third longest timespan between first and second wins.

McDormand won her first Oscar for “Fargo” a whoppin’ 21 years ago — that’s a whole person who can drink! She’d be behind only Meryl Streep (“Sophie’s Choice,” “The Iron Lady”), who waited 29 years, and Katharine Hepburn (“Morning Glory,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”), who holds the record at 34 years.

Most two-time Best Actress winners garner their second statuette within a decade of their first, usually within the first five years in that “honeymoon period” when, to paraphrase one double champ, they like you,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Brad Fiedel interview: composing Terminator 2's iconic score

Ryan Lambie Dec 6, 2017

Composer Brad Fiedel talks to us about his stunning music for The Terminator and its sequel, T2...

Across a varied and illustrious career, New York-born musician Brad Fiedel has conjured up some unforgettable sounds. He was the keyboard player for soft rock outfit Hall & Oates in the 70s; as a composer, Fiedel's career spanned 20 years and an eclectic mix of film and TV: cult horror classic Fright Night, hit drama The Accused, 90s sci-fi action thriller Johnny Mnemonic to name a few.

See related  PlayStation 4 and Xbox One bundles: best deals on Amazon now The top 37 movie Lego sets you can buy right now

But for most movie geeks, Fiedel will be most closely associated with his unforgettable music for James Cameron's Terminator and Terminator 2. By turns percussive and melancholy, his electronic score encapsulated the themes of Cameron's nightmarish chase movies as eloquently as the images: the off-kilter,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Jodie Foster Shares Touching Tribute to Late Director Jonathan Demme: 'He Was Pure Energy'

Jodie Foster Shares Touching Tribute to Late Director Jonathan Demme: 'He Was Pure Energy'
Jodie Foster is paying tribute to legendary director Jonathan Demme following his death on Wednesday.

The actress released a touching statement to media outlets mourning the loss of the groundbreaking filmmaker, and celebrating his impressive life and legacy.

Watch: Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs' and 'Philadelphia' Director, Dies at 73

"I am heart-broken to lose a friend, a mentor, a guy so singular and dynamic you’d have to design a hurricane to contain him," Foster shared. "Jonathan was as quirky as his comedies and as deep as his dramas. He was pure energy, the unstoppable cheerleader for anyone creative. Just as passionate about music as he was about art, he was and will always be a champion of the soul."

"[He was] most beloved, something wild, brother of love, director of the lambs," she continued. "Love that guy. Love him so much."

Foster delivered one of her career-defining performances as rookie FBI Agent Clarice Starling
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

From the People Archives: How Jonathan Demme’s Silence of the Lambs Was Made — and the Real Serial Killers That Inspired It

From the People Archives: How Jonathan Demme’s Silence of the Lambs Was Made — and the Real Serial Killers That Inspired It
Director Jonathan Demme, known for his hit movie The Silence of the Lambs, died Wednesday due to complications from esophageal cancer at the age of 73. Here, People takes a look back at a 1991 story on the making of Lambs and the real-life serial killers and FBI agents that inspired its unforgettable — and horrific — characters.

The cell door opens. Into a dank asylum basement steps Clarice Starling, the FBI trainee dispatched by her driven boss to interview the mad doctor. Clang! The door slams shut behind her. Simultaneously fearful and determined, she makes her way down the dark corridor to confront psychiatrist Dr.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Dave Bautista to Co-Star with Jodie Foster in New Thriller Hotel Artemis

  • DailyDead
Daily Dead recently caught up with Dave Bautista at the Sundance Film Festival for the world premiere of his new film Bushwick, and it's been announced at the European Film Market in Berlin that the actor has now joined Jodie Foster in the thriller Hotel Artemis, which will take place in a hospital for criminals.

Press Release: Berlin – The Ink Factory, a multi-platform production company dedicated to high-end story telling through film, television and on digital, today announced that Dave Bautista (Spectre, Guardians of the Galaxy) will join Academy Award winner Jodie Foster (Silence of the Lambs, The Accused) in Drew Pearce’s (Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation, Iron Man 3) much-anticipated directorial debut Hotel Artemis. Lionsgate launched international sales on the Ink Factory financed and produced action thriller at this week’s Berlin Efm (European Film Market), with Wme Global handling U.S. rights.

Best Picture Academy Award nominee Marc Platt (La La Land,
See full article at DailyDead »

Dave Bautista joins the cast of Drew Pearce’s Hotel Artemis

Former WWE star Dave Baustisa has joined the cast of Hotel Artemis, the film which will be the directorial debut of Iron Man 3 writer Drew Pearce. The news of Bautista’s casting was announced at the Berlin Film Festival over the weekend.

Jodie Foster (Silence of the Lambs, The Accused) is already cast in the action-thriller, which goes before the cameras very soon.

Penned by Pearce and set in the near future, Hotel Artemis follows a nurse (Foster) who runs an underground hospital for Los Angeles’ most sinister criminals, and finds that one of her patients is actually there to assassinate another.

Director Pearce said: “Mr. Bautista is a force to be reckoned with — a powerful presence who’s equal parts strength and soulfulness. I’m a true fan, and it’s a privilege to have him in the world of Hotel Artemis.”

More news on the film as it comes our way.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Jodie Foster and Dave Bautista Oversee Criminals in ‘Hotel Artemis’

The Ink Factory today announced that Dave Bautista (Spectre, Guardians of the Galaxy) will join Academy Award winner Jodie Foster (pictured in Silence of the Lambs, The Accused) in Drew Pearce’s (Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, Iron Man 3) much-anticipated directorial debut Hotel Artemis, Bloody Disgusting learned. Penned by Pearce and set in the near future, Hotel Artemis follows a nurse (Foster) who […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Golden Globe Awards

10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Golden Globe Awards
Are you emotionally prepared for awards season?

Well, it’s officially upon us, with the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards airing on Sunday, Jan. 8, at 8 p.m. Et/5 p.m. Pt on NBC.

In anticipation of the show, hosted this year by Jimmy Fallon, we’re taking a look at some of the most interesting pieces of Globes trivia. Study this list carefully so you can sound extra-interesting at your viewing party.

1. The biggest Globes shutouts of all time were Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1967) and The Godfather, Part III (1991). Both films received seven nominations, but zero Globes.

2. One
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Jodie Foster To Star In Hotel Artemis

The Ink Factory, a multi-platform production company dedicated to high-end story telling through film, television and on digital, today announced that two-time Academy Award-winner Jodie Foster will star in Drew Pearce’s much-anticipated directorial debut Hotel Artemis. Simon and Stephen Cornwell are producing for The Ink Factory, which will also finance.

Drew Pearce (Iron Man 3, Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation, Godzilla) will direct from his own script, with Adam Siegel and Marc Platt producing for Marc Platt Productions. The Ink Factory’s Becky Sloviter is overseeing, and Pearce will executive produce through his Point of No Return production banner.

Set in its own distinctive crime universe, Hotel Artemis is based on an original script by Pearce. Jodie Foster joins the original near-future thriller in the character of “The Nurse.”

“Casting Jodie Foster is a real coup. She is an extraordinary talent and will bring something very special to the film.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Jodie Foster to Star in Crime Thriller ‘Hotel Artemis’

Jodie Foster to Star in Crime Thriller ‘Hotel Artemis’
Jodie Foster will star in Drew Pearce’s feature directorial debut, the near-future crime thriller “Hotel Artemis.”

Simon and Stephen Cornwell are producing for The Ink Factory, which will also finance. Pearce, whose writing credits include “Iron Man 3” and “Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation,” will direct from his own script. The logline is under wraps.

Adam Siegel and Marc Platt are producing for Marc Platt Productions. The Ink Factory’s Becky Sloviter is overseeing, and Pearce will executive produce through his Point of No Return production banner.

“Casting Jodie Foster is a real coup,” Stephen Conrwell said. “She is an extraordinary talent and will bring something very special to the film. We are delighted to welcome her to this exciting production. Drew’s vision is unique and we can’t wait to see it brought to life by a stellar cast.”

Platt noted that he worked with Foster on “The Silence of the Lambs
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jennifer Lawrence Pays Tribute Jodie Foster, Who’s Happy to Hand Off Title of ‘Clumsiest Actress in Hollywood’

Jennifer Lawrence Pays Tribute Jodie Foster, Who’s Happy to Hand Off Title of ‘Clumsiest Actress in Hollywood’
Call it a mutual admiration society: one-time child actress turned Academy Award-winning movie star Jennifer Lawrence paid tribute to one-time child actress turned two-time Oscar winner and filmmaker Jodie Foster, who admitted that the two also share a history of clumsiness at awards ceremonies.

Dressed in a draping mauve Elie Saab gown, Lawrence, 26, took the stage at the British Academy’s Britannia Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills to present Foster, 53, with the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film on Friday. Foster, clad in a shimmering Burberry gown, was accompanied by her wife Alexandra Hedison
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Jodie Foster to Receive Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award

Jodie Foster to Receive Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award
Jodie Foster will be this year’s recipient of the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film at the October ceremony, it was announced on Monday.

“It seems fitting that in this 40th Anniversary year of both ‘Taxi Driver’ and ‘Bugsy Malone,’ we are honoring Jodie’s remarkable trail-blazing career at the Britannia Awards,” said Kieran Breen, chairman of BAFTA Los Angeles, in a statement. “It takes a rare and special talent to launch an international career with two amazingly different performances, and Jodie’s choices as an actor and director have continued to earn a deserved reputation as one of the most versatile professionals of our time.”

Foster’s 50-year career started at age three as “The Coppertone Girl” in the television commercial, but it was her role as Iris “Easy” Steensma in “Taxi Driver” (1976) that gained her world-wide recognition. Her most prominent roles in film have landed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Money Monster’ Exclusive Featurette: George Clooney, Jack O’Connell Praise Director Jodie Foster

‘Money Monster’ Exclusive Featurette: George Clooney, Jack O’Connell Praise Director Jodie Foster
The thriller “Money Monster” follows financial TV personality Lee Gates (George Clooney) who advises his audience on commerce and Wall Street with the help of longtime director Patty Fenn (Julia Roberts). One day on air, laborer Kyle Budwell (Jack O’Connell) takes him hostage and straps explosives to his chest demanding answers about an investment gone wrong. Soon, the entire team scrambles to discover what happened with the company in question and they find a pattern of corruption that goes all the way to the top. In honor of its digital release, watch an exclusive behind-the-scenes featurette from the film below, with George Clooney, Jack O’Connell, and screenwriter Jamie Linden praising the work of director Jodie Foster.

Read More: Review: Jodie Foster’s ‘Money Monster’ Wants to Be ‘Network’ for the Occupy Wall Street Age

Jodie Foster has previously directed three feature films: “Little Man Tate,” about a mother
See full article at Indiewire »

Marvel to explore the fallout from Civil War II with The Accused and The Fallen

Following the shocking events of Civil War II #3, Marvel has announced it is to explore the fallout with two new one-shots entitled The Accused #1 and The Fallen #1.

First, it’s the trial of the century as Marc Guggenheim (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.), Ramon Bachs (Secret Wars Journal) and Garry Brown (Iron Patriot) bring you The Accused #1! As a beloved Avenger falls, another takes the stand to answer for his death. As Hawkeye stands trial amid a case full of super heroes and politics – who will prosecute? None other than Matt Murdock – Daredevil! But when Matt digs into the case and secrets come to light…he may not like what he finds. Has Daredevil bitten off more than he can chew? Amid a growing conspiracy, can the Marvel Universe’s most stalwart defender of justice promise a fair trial? The answers won’t come easy.

Then – legendary Hulk scribe Greg Pak (The
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

How Top Gun Star Kelly McGillis Survived Sexual Assaults and Emotional Struggles to Live a 'Quiet, Normal Life'

  • PEOPLE.com
How Top Gun Star Kelly McGillis Survived Sexual Assaults and Emotional Struggles to Live a 'Quiet, Normal Life'
She starred in some of Hollywood's most acclaimed blockbusters, but offscreen, Kelly McGillis faced almost unimaginable struggles. The actress, best known for starring in Top Gun, Witness and The Accused, has revealed she is a survivor of two brutal rapes, as well as several assaults - all horrific incidents she detailed on social media after her home was broken into and she was attacked last week. McGillis, now 58 and living in North Carolina, was viciously raped by two men 34 years ago - a life-changing attack she detailed to People in 1988. Before Fame, HorrorIn 1979, McGillis relocated to New York City from Newport Beach,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Hollywood Take Note: Here Are 16 Women Who Dominated the Cannes Film Festival

Hollywood Take Note: Here Are 16 Women Who Dominated the Cannes Film Festival
Forget the Cannes jury awards. This year, the most famous film festival in the world showcased something much bigger than a couple of prize-winners: Women filmmakers and actors at the top of their game.

It was hard to miss how much the women before and behind the camera were front and center, dominating the conversation in Cannes. More of the Official Selection films were focused on women than ever before. And a new kind of protagonist emerged at Cannes 2016. She’s independent, strong, often androgynous, and not defined by her relationships with men.

Hollywood producers, executives and filmmakers, take note. This is how it can be done.

Check out the fabulous women of Cannes 2016.

Isabelle Huppert

In Paul Verhoeven’s provocative thriller “Elle,” Isabelle Huppert plays a videogame entrepreneur who refuses to allow her violent rape in her own home to ruin her life. She doesn’t miss a beat. She doesn’t call the cops. She changes the locks, gets an Std test, buys pepper spray and learns how to use a gun. She’s a sophisticated, elegant, powerful, modern woman who lives alone, runs her own company, manipulates her family, has sex with whomever she fancies, and is free to do as she pleases.

At 63, Huppert believably plays a younger woman in her sexual prime, bringing all her experience to bear on the role, which was adapted from a French novel by an American screenwriter (David Birke) and then translated back into French when Huppert came aboard. She elevates the character into almost making sense. Typically, Verhoeven refuses to supply psychological underpinnings for what she does. But Huppert makes us believe. With critics and awards-savvy Sony Pictures Classics behind “Elle,” this commercial movie could wind up a North American hit this fall, a French Oscar nominee (if France submits it), and a Best Actress Oscar contender.

Kristen Stewart

Another independent woman is at the center of Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” his second English-language film starring Stewart (Cesar-winner for “Clouds of Sils Maria”). She plays Maureen, who acquires fashionable clothes for a rich client, flits around Paris on a scooter, and reaches the people in her life via Skype and mobile. She’s trying to use her skills as a medium to communicate with her twin brother, who has recently died, when mysterious texts suddenly appear on her iPhone. “Who is this?” she asks. “Personal Shopper” tracks a lost and lonely soul who is disconnected from herself. As she tries on her client’s sexy costumes and figures out who is tracking her, she eventually finds her identity again.

Stewart had a good Cannes, showing her stripes not only in her roles in “Personal Shopper” and opener Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society,” but by deftly fielding, with finesse and poise, the many questions thrown at her during press conferences and interviews. She refused to be drawn into the Allen controversy (unlike co-star Blake Lively), wore flats when she could have worn heels, and explained why she likes working with intellectual directors like Assayas. She’s a smart career shaper with a rosy future who rather than conform to Hollywood demands, prefers to make her own choices on the world stage.

Maren Ade and Sandra Hüller

Father-daughter tension forms the backbone of two of the best films in Competition, Screen International’s critics’ poll winner “Toni Erdmann” and directing prize co-winner Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation.”

German filmmaker Maren Ade‘s third feature is a generational comedy that pits a goofy father (Peter Simonischek) against his workaholic corporate strategist daughter Ines (Sandra Hüller). She’s a woman in a man’s world who thinks she doesn’t need feminism, who Ade sees as almost “a gender-neutral character.” After anxiously trying to prove herself to her male bosses, Ines eventually gets what her father is trying to tell her via his crazy antics and humor. She sees things more clearly, reconnects with him, and takes control of her own life.

Maria Dragus

The young Romanian star of Michael Haneke’s “The White Ribbon” shines in Mungiu’s “Graduation,” which sends a controlling father (Adrian Titieni) into a tailspin when his long-held post-graduation plans for his daughter (Dragus) go terribly awry. At the start of “Graduation,” the daughter’s rape sets in motion a series of revelations, compromises and ethical dilemmas as the father tries desperately to keep things on track. To her credit, his daughter refuses to go along with his schemes, stands up to him with strength and moral fortitude, and finally sets free her two protective parents from all their secrets and lies.

Andrea Arnold, Sasha Lane and Riley Keough British director Arnold took home the Cannes jury prize for the third time for her daring American road movie “American Honey” (A24), an empowering coming of age story starring unknown Sasha Lane, making Arnold three for three at the fest after 2006’s “Red Road” and 2009’s “Fish Tank.”

Critics adored the film, which was shaped by the American midwestern landscape as well as the editing room. Arnold’s final film was vastly different from its original script, turning toward the young woman finding her identity as its through-line—Shia Labeouf and Elvis Presley granddaughter Riley Keough (“Mad Max: Fury Road”) offered stalwart support— and was unlike anything else at Cannes this year.

Jodie Foster and Julia Roberts Foster likes bringing smart movies like “Money Monster” and “The Beaver” to Cannes—it’s a film festival for smart people, after all —and she introduced “Money Monster” star Julia Roberts to the Croisette, who walked up the red carpet with bare feet, reminding us all that she has nothing to prove. “We were thrilled for Julia,” Foster told me in our video interview. “George is so excited to show her Cannes, and wanted her to have that moment seeing that sea of photographers.”

Money Monster” was the perfect Cannes out-of-competition studio entry, an entertaining populist Wall Street/media critique for festival gala audiences, with major movie stars for the tapis rouge, press conference and junket for a European market launch. Not surprisingly, the actors are terrific: Clooney plays a glib financial TV guru held hostage by an angry victim of his bad advice (a surprisingly sympathetic Jack O’Connell), who fits him with a bomb vest as punishment. Roberts as Clooney’s producer beams the story live as everyone scrambles to come out of the crisis intact.

As a Hollywood movie star who pushed past conventional women’s roles, scoring four Oscar nominations and two wins (“The Accused,” “The Silence of the Lambs”) and has carried many commercial movies on her own (“Contact,” “Panic Room,” “Flight Plan”), Foster beefed up Roberts’ character to give her more purpose and dimension. In the original script she was more of a technician, but Foster turned her into a competent, strong, active producer who helps Clooney’s character find his strength and unravel the mystery.

Adèle Haenel

In Cannes regulars Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s “The Unknown Girl” (Sundance Selects), Haenel plays another gender-neutral character, an excellent, empathetic doctor who is not defined by her relationships or friends; she lives a solitary, monastic life devoted to the well-being of her patients. When she ignores a late-hour doorbell at her private practice and finds out from the police that the young woman was murdered nearby, the doctor embarks on a mission, against the wishes of many including the police, to identify the girl and inform her family of her death.

Kim Min-hee and Kim Tae-ri

With erotic mystery “The Handmaiden” (Amazon) great Korean auteur Park Chan-wook moved the Victorian setting of the novel “Fingersmith” to the 30s period when Japan occupied Korea. Told in two parts from two distinct points-of-view, the lushly mounted movie follows a rich Korean gentlewoman (star Kim Min-hee) and her maidservant (newcomer Kim Tae-ri) who not only fall lustily in love, but plot against their oppressive masters. Park has fashioned a luscious tale of sexual expression and female empowerment.

Elle Fanning

Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Neon Demon” also puts women front and center, led by Elle Fanning, who was 16 when she was cast, 17 when she shot the film, and is now 18. She plays a newcomer to the La fashion scene who discovers that starving models literally eat each other alive. In one memorable scene, when one x-ray known as the bionic woman (because she has altered so much of her body) throws up an eyeball, her best friend pops it into her own mouth. Refn said he wanted to make the women characters primary and the men secondary. While the movie was not a critical hit in Cannes and did not win any prizes, the stylishly transgressive genre exercise could become a smart-horror hit stateside when Amazon Studios releases it in June.

Adriana Ugarte and Emma Suárez These two superb Spanish actresses star as the young and older incarnations of Pedro Almodóvar’s latest female creation, “Julieta” (Sony Pictures Classics). The Spanish auteur’s adaptation of three Alice Munro stories was originally going to star Meryl Streep in an English-language version, in which she would have used makeup to play both roles. This way the movie takes on a decidedly Hitchcockian tone, as the very blonde young Julieta (Ugarte) enjoys mad sex with a stranger on a train, while the older and soberer Julieta (Suárez) is less open, prey to feelings of loss and regret. Why is she estranged from her daughter? What went wrong the day her husband went fishing in the face of an impending storm? This twisted family saga unfolds in cinematic ways that could only come from Almodóvar. Related storiesTop Women Cinematographers Reveal 7 Best Tips for Career SuccessCannes Film Festival Awards 2016Cannes Today: New Talent Emerges
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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