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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 2000

13 items from 2016


Jodie Foster to Receive Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award

26 September 2016 1:43 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jodie Foster will be this year’s recipient of the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film at the October ceremony, it was announced on Monday.

“It seems fitting that in this 40th Anniversary year of both ‘Taxi Driver’ and ‘Bugsy Malone,’ we are honoring Jodie’s remarkable trail-blazing career at the Britannia Awards,” said Kieran Breen, chairman of BAFTA Los Angeles, in a statement. “It takes a rare and special talent to launch an international career with two amazingly different performances, and Jodie’s choices as an actor and director have continued to earn a deserved reputation as one of the most versatile professionals of our time.”

Foster’s 50-year career started at age three as “The Coppertone Girl” in the television commercial, but it was her role as Iris “Easy” Steensma in “Taxi Driver” (1976) that gained her world-wide recognition. Her most prominent roles in film have landed »

- Joshua Terry

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‘Money Monster’ Exclusive Featurette: George Clooney, Jack O’Connell Praise Director Jodie Foster

17 August 2016 3:08 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The thriller “Money Monster” follows financial TV personality Lee Gates (George Clooney) who advises his audience on commerce and Wall Street with the help of longtime director Patty Fenn (Julia Roberts). One day on air, laborer Kyle Budwell (Jack O’Connell) takes him hostage and straps explosives to his chest demanding answers about an investment gone wrong. Soon, the entire team scrambles to discover what happened with the company in question and they find a pattern of corruption that goes all the way to the top. In honor of its digital release, watch an exclusive behind-the-scenes featurette from the film below, with George Clooney, Jack O’Connell, and screenwriter Jamie Linden praising the work of director Jodie Foster.

Read More: Review: Jodie Foster’s ‘Money Monster’ Wants to Be ‘Network’ for the Occupy Wall Street Age

Jodie Foster has previously directed three feature films: “Little Man Tate,” about a mother »

- Vikram Murthi

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Marvel to explore the fallout from Civil War II with The Accused and The Fallen

14 July 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Following the shocking events of Civil War II #3, Marvel has announced it is to explore the fallout with two new one-shots entitled The Accused #1 and The Fallen #1.

First, it’s the trial of the century as Marc Guggenheim (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.), Ramon Bachs (Secret Wars Journal) and Garry Brown (Iron Patriot) bring you The Accused #1! As a beloved Avenger falls, another takes the stand to answer for his death. As Hawkeye stands trial amid a case full of super heroes and politics – who will prosecute? None other than Matt Murdock – Daredevil! But when Matt digs into the case and secrets come to light…he may not like what he finds. Has Daredevil bitten off more than he can chew? Amid a growing conspiracy, can the Marvel Universe’s most stalwart defender of justice promise a fair trial? The answers won’t come easy.

Then – legendary Hulk scribe Greg Pak (The »

- Amie Cranswick

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How Top Gun Star Kelly McGillis Survived Sexual Assaults and Emotional Struggles to Live a 'Quiet, Normal Life'

25 June 2016 8:35 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

She starred in some of Hollywood's most acclaimed blockbusters, but offscreen, Kelly McGillis faced almost unimaginable struggles. The actress, best known for starring in Top Gun, Witness and The Accused, has revealed she is a survivor of two brutal rapes, as well as several assaults - all horrific incidents she detailed on social media after her home was broken into and she was attacked last week. McGillis, now 58 and living in North Carolina, was viciously raped by two men 34 years ago - a life-changing attack she detailed to People in 1988. Before Fame, HorrorIn 1979, McGillis relocated to New York City from Newport Beach, »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

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Hollywood Take Note: Here Are 16 Women Who Dominated the Cannes Film Festival

25 May 2016 5:08 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Forget the Cannes jury awards. This year, the most famous film festival in the world showcased something much bigger than a couple of prize-winners: Women filmmakers and actors at the top of their game.

It was hard to miss how much the women before and behind the camera were front and center, dominating the conversation in Cannes. More of the Official Selection films were focused on women than ever before. And a new kind of protagonist emerged at Cannes 2016. She’s independent, strong, often androgynous, and not defined by her relationships with men.

Hollywood producers, executives and filmmakers, take note. This is how it can be done.

Check out the fabulous women of Cannes 2016.

Isabelle Huppert

In Paul Verhoeven’s provocative thriller “Elle,” Isabelle Huppert plays a videogame entrepreneur who refuses to allow her violent rape in her own home to ruin her life. She doesn’t miss a beat. She doesn’t call the cops. She changes the locks, gets an Std test,  buys pepper spray and learns how to use a gun. She’s a sophisticated, elegant, powerful, modern woman who lives alone, runs her own company, manipulates her family, has sex with whomever she fancies, and is free to do as she pleases.

At 63, Huppert believably plays a younger woman in her sexual prime, bringing all her experience to bear on the role, which was adapted from a French novel by an American screenwriter (David Birke) and then translated back into French when Huppert came aboard. She elevates the character into almost making sense. Typically, Verhoeven refuses to supply psychological underpinnings for what she does. But Huppert makes us believe. With critics and awards-savvy Sony Pictures Classics behind “Elle,” this commercial movie could wind up a North American hit this fall, a French Oscar nominee (if France submits it), and a Best Actress Oscar contender.

Kristen Stewart

Another independent woman is at the center of Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” his second English-language film starring Stewart (Cesar-winner for “Clouds of Sils Maria”). She plays Maureen, who acquires fashionable clothes for a rich client, flits around Paris on a scooter, and reaches the people in her life via Skype and mobile. She’s trying to use her skills as a medium to communicate with her twin brother, who has recently died, when mysterious texts suddenly appear on her iPhone. “Who is this?” she asks. “Personal Shopper” tracks a lost and lonely soul who is disconnected from herself. As she tries on her client’s sexy costumes and figures out who is tracking her, she eventually finds her identity again.

Stewart had a good Cannes, showing her stripes not only in her roles in “Personal Shopper” and opener Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society,” but by deftly fielding, with finesse and poise, the many questions thrown at her during press conferences and interviews. She refused to be drawn into the Allen controversy (unlike co-star Blake Lively), wore flats when she could have worn heels, and explained why she likes working with intellectual directors like Assayas. She’s a smart career shaper with a rosy future who rather than conform to Hollywood demands, prefers to make her own choices on the world stage.

Maren Ade and Sandra Hüller

Father-daughter tension forms the backbone of two of the best films in Competition, Screen International’s critics’ poll winner “Toni Erdmann” and directing prize co-winner Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation.”

German filmmaker Maren Ade‘s third feature is a generational comedy that pits a goofy father (Peter Simonischek) against his workaholic corporate strategist daughter Ines (Sandra Hüller). She’s a woman in a man’s world who thinks she doesn’t need feminism, who Ade sees as almost “a gender-neutral character.” After anxiously trying to prove herself to her male bosses, Ines eventually gets what her father is trying to tell her via his crazy antics and humor. She sees things more clearly, reconnects with him, and takes control of her own life.

Maria Dragus

The young Romanian star of Michael Haneke’s “The White Ribbon” shines in Mungiu’s “Graduation,” which sends a controlling father (Adrian Titieni) into a tailspin when his long-held post-graduation plans for his daughter (Dragus) go terribly awry. At the start of “Graduation,” the daughter’s rape sets in motion a series of revelations, compromises and ethical dilemmas as the father tries desperately to keep things on track. To her credit, his daughter refuses to go along with his schemes, stands up to him with strength and moral fortitude, and finally sets free her two protective parents from all their secrets and lies.

Andrea Arnold, Sasha Lane and Riley Keough British director Arnold took home the Cannes jury prize for the third time for her daring American road movie “American Honey” (A24), an empowering coming of age story starring unknown Sasha Lane, making Arnold three for three at the fest after 2006’s “Red Road” and 2009’s “Fish Tank.”

Critics adored the film, which was shaped by the American midwestern landscape as well as the editing room. Arnold’s final film was vastly different from its original script, turning toward the young woman finding her identity as its through-line—Shia Labeouf and Elvis Presley granddaughter Riley Keough (“Mad Max: Fury Road”) offered stalwart support— and was unlike anything else at Cannes this year.

Jodie Foster and Julia Roberts Foster likes bringing smart movies like “Money Monster” and “The Beaver” to Cannes—it’s a film festival for smart people, after all —and she introduced “Money Monster” star Julia Roberts to the Croisette, who walked up the red carpet with bare feet, reminding us all that she has nothing to prove. “We were thrilled for Julia,” Foster told me in our video interview. “George is so excited to show her Cannes, and wanted her to have that moment seeing that sea of photographers.”

Money Monster” was the perfect Cannes out-of-competition studio entry, an entertaining populist Wall Street/media critique for festival gala audiences, with major movie stars for the tapis rouge, press conference and junket for a European market launch. Not surprisingly, the actors are terrific: Clooney plays a glib financial TV guru held hostage by an angry victim of his bad advice (a surprisingly sympathetic Jack O’Connell), who fits him with a bomb vest as punishment. Roberts as Clooney’s producer beams the story live as everyone scrambles to come out of the crisis intact.

As a Hollywood movie star who pushed past conventional women’s roles, scoring four Oscar nominations and two wins (“The Accused,” “The Silence of the Lambs”) and has carried many commercial movies on her own (“Contact,” “Panic Room,” “Flight Plan”), Foster beefed up Roberts’ character to give her more purpose and dimension. In the original script she was more of a technician, but Foster turned her into a competent, strong, active producer who helps Clooney’s character find his strength and unravel the mystery.

Adèle Haenel

In Cannes regulars Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s “The Unknown Girl” (Sundance Selects), Haenel plays another gender-neutral character, an excellent, empathetic doctor who is not defined by her relationships or friends; she lives a solitary, monastic life devoted to the well-being of her patients. When she ignores a late-hour doorbell at her private practice and finds out from the police that the young woman was murdered nearby, the doctor embarks on a mission, against the wishes of many including the police, to identify the girl and inform her family of her death.

Kim Min-hee and Kim Tae-ri

With erotic mystery “The Handmaiden” (Amazon) great Korean auteur Park Chan-wook moved the Victorian setting of the novel “Fingersmith” to the 30s period when Japan occupied Korea. Told in two parts from two distinct points-of-view, the lushly mounted movie follows a rich Korean gentlewoman (star Kim Min-hee) and her maidservant (newcomer Kim Tae-ri) who not only fall lustily in love, but plot against their oppressive masters. Park has fashioned a luscious tale of sexual expression and female empowerment.

Elle Fanning

Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Neon Demon” also puts women front and center, led by Elle Fanning, who was 16 when she was cast, 17 when she shot the film, and is now 18. She plays a newcomer to the La fashion scene who discovers that starving models literally eat each other alive. In one memorable scene, when one x-ray known as the bionic woman (because she has altered so much of her body) throws up an eyeball, her best friend pops it into her own mouth. Refn said he wanted to make the women characters primary and the men secondary. While the movie was not a critical hit in Cannes and did not win any prizes, the stylishly transgressive genre exercise could become a smart-horror hit stateside when Amazon Studios releases it in June.

Adriana Ugarte and Emma Suárez These two superb Spanish actresses star as the young and older incarnations of Pedro Almodóvar’s latest female creation, “Julieta” (Sony Pictures Classics). The Spanish auteur’s adaptation of three Alice Munro stories was originally going to star Meryl Streep in an English-language version, in which she would have used makeup to play both roles. This way the movie takes on a decidedly Hitchcockian tone, as the very blonde young Julieta (Ugarte) enjoys mad sex with a stranger on a train, while the older and soberer Julieta (Suárez) is less open, prey to feelings of loss and regret. Why is she estranged from her daughter? What went wrong the day her husband went fishing in the face of an impending storm? This twisted family saga unfolds in cinematic ways that could only come from Almodóvar. Related storiesTop Women Cinematographers Reveal 7 Best Tips for Career SuccessCannes Film Festival Awards 2016Cannes Today: New Talent Emerges »

- Anne Thompson

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Jodie Foster Slams Male Filmmakers for Relying on Rape as a Motivational Device for Female Characters

12 May 2016 3:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Jodie Foster has an issue with male filmmakers relying on rape as a motivational backstory for their female characters. The Money Monster director brought up her frustration with the storytelling trope during Variety and Kering’s Women in Motion talk at the Cannes Film Festival. "I wonder why she was a box of tears?" Foster asked, speaking as a hypothetical male writer. "Oh, she was raped." Or if a female character is having trouble with her boss, Foster said writers will often reason, "Well, it was because she was raped and you’re going to find that out in the end. »

- Michael Miller, @write_miller

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Jodie Foster Slams Male Filmmakers for Relying on Rape as a Motivational Device for Female Characters

12 May 2016 3:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Jodie Foster has an issue with male filmmakers relying on rape as a motivational backstory for their female characters. The Money Monster director brought up her frustration with the storytelling trope during Variety and Kering’s Women in Motion talk at the Cannes Film Festival. "I wonder why she was a box of tears?" Foster asked, speaking as a hypothetical male writer. "Oh, she was raped." Or if a female character is having trouble with her boss, Foster said writers will often reason, "Well, it was because she was raped and you’re going to find that out in the end. »

- Michael Miller, @write_miller

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50 Years of Fame! Inside the Twists of Fate That Led to Jodie Foster's Wild Ride as a Child Star

12 May 2016 9:10 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Here's one from the what-if files: What if Jodie Foster's star-making turn never happened? The double Oscar winner, who's celebrating half a century in show business, almost never got the chance to make Taxi Driver, the movie that cemented her place in Hollywood history. Sure, we think of Foster as Hollywood royalty now. But the actress, whose fourth film as a director, Money Monster, comes out Friday, might just be yet another anonymous Yale grad if it weren't for fate. The 53-year-old first got into the business by a stroke of luck. Her mother, Evelyn "Brandy" Almond, toted 3-year-old »

- Alynda Wheat, @AlyndaWheat

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Jodie Foster: Studios Are Scared of Women, Says Blockbuster Culture Harms Movie Industry

12 May 2016 6:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hollywood’s current obsession with big-budget tentpoles is holding the movie business back when it comes to creating more films by and for women, Jodie Foster said at the Cannes Film Festival on Thursday. Films that once traditionally starred women, such as romantic comedies and mid-budget dramas, are now migrating to television, as studios back superhero movies and special-effects driven action films.

“They’ll make enormous movies tentpole films and they’ll be all in, kind of like a casino bet,” Foster said at Variety and Kering’s Women in Motion talk. “That’s a really dangerous bet.”

Because of the enormous costs, studio executives are hesitant to take chances on new directorial voices. Film is, after all, very much a filmmaker-driven medium. There’s only so much control that a studio chief can maintain from a lot in Hollywood when a picture is being made several zip codes away. »

- Brent Lang

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'Silence of the Lambs' at 25: 'It Broke All the Rules'

12 February 2016 6:30 AM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

I was terrified at the Academy Awards," screenwriter Ted Tally says. "I can't describe how nerve-racking it is. You go in the bathrooms, and people are boozing it up, smoking, doing lines of coke. You never saw so many famous people so nervous."

Twenty-five years ago on this coming Valentine's Day, The Silence of the Lambs opened in movie theaters. An intense, gritty crime odyssey, in which an FBI cadet (Jodie Foster as Clarice Starling) hunts down a serial killer (Ted Levine as Jame "Buffalo Bill" Gumb) with the help of another, »

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Wrap-Ranker Poll: Who’s Best Actress to Win Oscar, Golden Globe for Same Role?

11 February 2016 9:09 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

After covering the best actors to win an Oscar and a Golden Globe, it’s time we turn our attention to the leading ladies. Jodie Foster is a two-time winner of the Oscar/Globe sweep for playing a rape survivor in “The Accused” and FBI agent Clarice Starling in “The Silence of the Lambs,” arguably the role she is still known for today. Another two-time winner for both awards, Meryl Streep spanned a few decades between playing a grieving Holocaust survivor in “Sophie’s Choice” to portraying Margaret Thatcher in “The Iron Lady.” Also Read: Hey, Oscar Nominees: Here's the Secret to Winning Best Picture. »

- Matt Hejl

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Growing Up Golden: How Saoirse Ronan Broke the Child Star Jinx with Her Second Oscar Nomination

14 January 2016 7:05 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Saoirse Ronan is going where few former child starlets have gone before her: back to the Oscars for first time since she was 13. The Irish actress was nominated for Best Actress for her performance in the period drama Brooklyn on Thursday, and she's considered by many critics to be a serious contender in a category that includes the likes of Brie Larson and Cate Blanchett. And while Ronan is only 21, this isn't her first trip to the rodeo. The actress shot to stardom back in 2007 for her turn as Briony Tallis in the film adaptation of Ian McEwan's 2001 novel Atonement. »

- Mike Miller

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Golden Globes: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Awards Ceremony

8 January 2016 7:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

For a night known as Hollywood's most notorious open-bar gala, the Golden Globes ceremony remains shrouded in mystery.

Most viewers probably don't even know who presents it (the Hollywood Foreign Press Association), how many voting members it has (only about 90), or what qualifies them to pass judgment on movies and television. Yet movie fans and awards mavens continue to take the Globes seriously as a precursor to the Academy Awards, since some of the Globe honorees will indeed go on to win Oscars. With Ricky Gervais set to reprise his hosting duties this weekend, here are 25 things you need to know about the Globes.

1. Founded in October 1943 by eight foreign-market journalists, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (then called the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association) held its first awards ceremony the following spring, as a luncheon at 20th Century Fox. Instead of trophies, the winners took home scrolls.

2. The next year, the »

- Moviefone Staff

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002 | 2000

13 items from 2016


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