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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 33 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Frankie and Johnny Is Garry Marshall’s Most Underrated Film

20 July 2016 1:22 PM, PDT | MTV Newsroom | See recent MTV Newsroom news »

With the passing of Garry Marshall yesterday, Hollywood has lost one of its defining comedic voices. Though his acting credits in projects like Soapdish or Murphy Brown made him a recognizable figure right up to the end of his life, as a director, Marshall is probably best rewarded for his megahit Pretty Woman, best known... Frankie and Johnny Is Garry Marshall’s Most Underrated Film">Read more » »

- Teo Bugbee

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Frankie and Johnny Is Garry Marshall’s Most Underrated Film

20 July 2016 1:22 PM, PDT | MTV Movie News | See recent MTV Movie News news »

With the passing of Garry Marshall yesterday, Hollywood has lost one of its defining comedic voices. Though his acting credits in projects like Soapdish or Murphy Brown made him a recognizable figure right up to the end of his life, as a director, Marshall is probably best rewarded for his megahit Pretty Woman, best known... Frankie and Johnny Is Garry Marshall’s Most Underrated Film">Read more » »

- Teo Bugbee

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Garry Marshall, Pretty Woman and Princess Diaries Director, Dies at 81

20 July 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Sad news for movie fans. Iconic American filmmaker and legendary TV sitcom creator Garry Marshall has passed away. Perhaps best known for turning Julia Roberts into a household name with his classic 1990 romanic comedy Pretty Woman, the man succumbed to complications from pneumonia following a stroke. A Los Angeles resident most of his life, he died Tuesday night in a Burbank, California hospital.

Garry Marshall was 81 years old at the time of his passing. Along with Pretty Woman, he also helped establish actress Anne Hathaway as a true Hollywood star with both 2001's The Princess Diaries and its 2004 sequel The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement. A true legend in both the world of film and television, news of his untimely demise was first announced by Access Hollywood. Cause of death was then later confirmed by TMZ.

Born in the Bronx, New York, Marshall began his career on television writing for Jack Paar's Tonight Show. »

- MovieWeb

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Garry Marshall, Happy Days Creator, TV Writer, Producer and Director, Dies at 81

19 July 2016 9:57 PM, PDT | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

If you are a fan of entertainment, the odds are, you're a fan of Garry Marshall.

The prolific writer, director and producer of television and movies died today at the age of 81 due from complications of pneumonia after a stroke.

Marshall's long line of televisions credits includes The Dick Van Dyke Show, Happy Days, and The Odd Couple among others.

Marshall's first television credit was for three episodes of The Jack Parr Tonight Show in 1960. Over the next 50 plus years, his credits looks like a virtual history of the American comedy.

Marshall not only created Happy Days, but the three spinoffs that came afterward, including Laverne & Shirley (starring his younger sister, Penny Marshall), Mork & Mindy (starring the late Robin Williams and Joanie & Chachi.

At one time, Marshall was writing three of the top four programs of the 1978-79 television season. 

Think about where we'd be without Marshall. Most likely, there »

- Carissa Pavlica

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Garry Marshall, ‘Happy Days’ Creator and ‘Pretty Woman’ Director, Dies at 81

19 July 2016 9:55 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Befitting his legacy as a comedy icon, Garry Marshall was busy working up until the end of his life.

Marshall died Tuesday due to pneumonia complications. He was 81.

Most recently, Marshall proudly served as an executive consultant on CBS’ “The Odd Couple” revival, now heading into its third season. Marshall, who turned the Neil Simon play into a hit ABC sitcom in the early 1970s, spent the past two years giving advice and working with the show’s producers. Earlier this year, he even appeared on camera as Walter Madison, Oscar’s (Matthew Perry) father.

“I keep creating,” Marshall told us in 2015 at the Television Critics Assn. press tour. “I’m still pitching shows, as many people are,” he said, referring to a show he had in the works at the time about triplets. “What’s exciting is when the network gets behind it. Here, CBS is behind [the ‘Odd Couple’ revival].”

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- Michael Schneider

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Garry Marshall: 1934-2016

19 July 2016 9:15 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Den Of Geek Jul 20, 2016

The creator of 1970s sitcoms such as Happy Days and director of movies like Pretty Woman, Garry Marshall, has passed away at the age of 81.

Producer, director, and actor Garry Marshall has died at the age of 81.

Garry Marshall was the creative force behind some of the most iconic sitcoms in American television history, including Happy Days, Laverne & Shirley, Mork & Mindy and many others. In total, Marshall executive produced over 1,000 half-hour episodes of television. Marshall’s film credits as a director are extensive and full of hits as well. His filmography includes Pretty Woman, The Flamingo Kid, Overboard and Runaway Bride. His final film, Mother's Day, was released earlier this year.

After getting his start writing in the Army for Stars & Stripes during a tour in Korea, Marshall wrote for the sports section of The New York Daily News by day and wrote stand-up comedy by night. »

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Garry Marshall, Happy Days Creator and Filmmaker, Dead at 81

19 July 2016 8:11 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Garry Marshall, whose contributions to screens small and big included Happy Days and the original TV adaptation of The Odd Couple, died on Tuesday at age 81.

Access Hollywood was first to report on the legend’s passing; per TMZ, he died from complications from pneumonia.

A Bronx native and brother to actress/director Penny Marshall and TV producer Ronny Marshall Hallin, Marshall started out his career as a writer for Jack Paar’s Tonight Show, The Joey Bishop Hour and The Dick Van Dyke Show. From there, he went on to develop for TV an adaptation of the Neil Simon play The Odd Couple, »

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Pretty Woman Director Garry Marshall Dies of Complications From Pneumonia at 81

19 July 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Garry Marshall, creator of Happy Days and director of Pretty Woman, has died. He was 81. Marshall, most known for developing and directing some of the most beloved TV shows and films, passed away on Tuesday evening of complications from pneumonia following a stroke at a hospital in Burbank, California, People can confirm. "He loved telling stories, making people laugh, and playing softball, winning numerous championships. Even at age 81, he had a record this year of 6-1 pitching for his team," his family said in a statement to People. A memorial is being planned for his birthday on November 13. Funeral services will be private. »

- Karen Mizoguchi

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Pretty Woman Director Garry Marshall Dies of Complications From Pneumonia at 81

19 July 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Garry Marshall, creator of Happy Days and director of Pretty Woman, has died. He was 81. Marshall, most known for developing and directing some of the most beloved TV shows and films, passed away on Tuesday evening of complications from pneumonia following a stroke at a hospital in Burbank, California, People can confirm. "He loved telling stories, making people laugh, and playing softball, winning numerous championships. Even at age 81, he had a record this year of 6-1 pitching for his team," his family said in a statement to People. A memorial is being planned for his birthday on November 13. Funeral services will be private. »

- Karen Mizoguchi

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Garry Marshall, ‘Pretty Woman’ Director and Creator of ‘Happy Days,’ Dies at 81

19 July 2016 7:57 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Garry Marshall, who created some of the 1970s’ most iconic sitcoms including “Happy Days,” “The Odd Couple,” “Laverne and Shirley” and “Mork and Mindy” and went on to direct hit movies including “Pretty Woman” and “The Princess Diaries,” died Tuesday of complications from pneumonia. He was 81. The news was first reported by Access Hollywood.

Marshall went from being TV writer to creating sitcoms that touched the funny bones of the 1970s generation and directing films that were watched over and over: “Happy Days” helped start a nostalgia craze that has arguably never abated, while “Mork and Mindy” had a psychedelically goofy quality that catapulted Robin Williams to fame and made rainbow suspenders an icon of their era. “Pretty Woman” likewise cemented Julia Roberts’ stardom, while “The Princess Diaries” made Anne Hathaway a teen favorite.

Happy Days” star Henry Winkler credited him for launching his career, tweeting “Thank you for my professional life. »

- Carmel Dagan

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Garry Marshall, ‘Pretty Woman’ Director and Creator of ‘Happy Days,’ Dies at 81

19 July 2016 7:57 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Garry Marshall, who created some of the 1970s’ most iconic sitcoms including “Happy Days,” “The Odd Couple,” “Laverne and Shirley” and “Mork and Mindy” and went on to direct hit movies including “Pretty Woman” and “The Princess Diaries,” died Tuesday. He was 81. The news was first reported by Access Hollywood.

Marshall’s first bigscreen blockbuster was 1990’s “Pretty Woman,” starring Julia Roberts as a highly idealized hooker and Richard Gere as her client-cum-Prince Charming. The romantic comedy grossed $463 million worldwide. Roberts was Oscar nominated for best actress, the film was nominated for a Golden Globe for best comedy/musical — and Marshall scored a Cesar nomination as “Pretty Woman” drew a mention in the French awards’ foreign-film category.

In 1970 Marshall had a substantial hit when he developed and exec produced an adaptation of Neil Simon’s play “The Odd Couple” for ABC. The show drew several Emmy nominations for outstanding comedy series and wins for stars Jack Klugman »

- Carmel Dagan

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R.I.P. Garry Marshall

19 July 2016 4:10 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Filmmaker Garry Marshall has died at the age of 81.

The Bronx-born director/producer was also an acclaimed writer and character actor. He began work as a joke writer in the 1960s before making the jump to television where he co-created "The Odd Couple" and went on to create "Happy Days," "Laverne and Shirley," "Joanie Loves Chachi" and "Mork and Mindy" in the 1970s and early 1980s.

Also in the 1980s he made the jump to directing with "The Flamingo Kid" his first hit. It was the one-two punch of megahits "Beaches" and "Pretty Woman" that made him a household name. Other notable hits include the two "The Princess Diaries" features, "Runaway Bride," "The Other Sister," "Georgia Rule" and more recently three holiday-themed ensemble rom-coms capped off by this year's "Mother's Day".

Over time Marshall also made a name for himself in acting circles, becoming a strong character actor and one »

- Garth Franklin

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‘Rules Don’t Apply’ Trailer: Warren Beatty Stars as Howard Hughes In 1950’s Hollywood Rom-Com

14 July 2016 7:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Warren Beatty’s new romantic comedy “Rules Don’t Apply” follows an aspiring actress, a lovable driver, and the eccentric Hollywood legend Howard Hughes (played by Beatty himself) as they struggle with each other’s own idiosyncrasies. Set in Hollywood in 1958, small town beauty queen and Baptist virgin Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins) arrives to Los Angeles to work under Howard Hughes. At the airport, she meets her driver Frank Forbes (Alden Ehrenreich), a religious Methodist who’s engaged to be married to his middle school sweetheart. Soon they fall for each other, and their attraction puts their respective religious convictions to the test, and also places them in violation of Hughes’ #1 rule: No employee will have a relationship with a contract actress. But as Hughes’ behavior becomes more erratic and strange, it intersects with Marla and Frank’s lives in challenging, compelling ways, leaving no one unchanged. The film also »

- Vikram Murthi

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TV Is Addicted to Addicts, But Does It Get Dependence Right?

14 June 2016 5:00 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

There’s a lingering perception in pop culture that drug use is glamorous and au courant, something that builds character and renders a person sexy and intriguing, like an advanced degree in comp lit or the ability to acquire foreign languages easily. See Don Draper with a martini in one hand and a beautiful mistress in the other. Or Jessa on “Girls,” whose bohemian clothes and Rapunzel hair perpetuate the illusion that cocaine-cum-heroin junkies forever maintain the appearance of a Free People catalogue model. In real life, heroin junkies develop abscesses and hacking coughs, sores on their lips and acne. They look like ghosts. Even on “Nurse Jackie,” one of the decade’s most convincing portraits of drug addiction, there were just so many episodes where you had to suspend your disbelief — Jackie should have been dead by season two. Of course, then we would have missed out on five more seasons and Edie Falco’s most dynamic career performance, for which she won the 2010 Emmy for lead actress in a drama.

Because of addiction’s prevalence in our society — according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2014 there were 10,574 heroin overdose deaths in the U.S. — TV is teeming with characters struggling with drugs and alcohol, from “Shameless” to “Mr. Robot” to IFC’s “Maron” and the sobriety sitcom “Mom.” And some shows do it well; if ever a series unflinchingly — if, occasionally, satirically — captured the gory violence of the crystal meth trade it’s “Breaking Bad,” for which Bryan Cranston pretty much monopolized the actor in a drama series category, winning the Emmy an astounding four times.

The Television Academy, in fact, has a history of rewarding small-screen lushes. For his iconic turn as the perpetually soused Hawkeye on “Mash,” Alan Alda won two actor Emmys. Candice Bergen won the Emmy for actress in a comedy series five times for playing a recovering alcoholic on “Murphy Brown,” and Ted Danson scored two Emmys for playing sobered-up baseball player-turned-bar proprietor Sam Malone on “Cheers.” Even Jim Parsons, who plays socially challenged theoretical physicist Sheldon Cooper on the “The Big Bang Theory,” nabbed his first Emmy win for an episode in which he gets sloppy drunk. Hollywood, it seems, loves a character who can’t handle his booze.

But rare is the series that deals with addiction in a way that accurately depicts the frustrating, oft fatal, and sometimes even boring reality of what it is — a disease. There’s a general tendency among critics to assess shows on the strength of their entertainment value, and not how truthfully they convey what it’s actually like to be an addict — or live with one. “Ray Donovan” tackles heady addiction-adjacent subject matter like molestation and Irish-Catholic broods, and “Orange Is the New Black” features a cast of addict convicts, but there isn’t a small-screen counterpart examining, say, the lives of depressed, college-educated worker bees quietly dependent on benzo­diazepines. And there are millions of those people.

Granted, most facets of addiction probably wouldn’t make for good television. Comedies like “Broad City” and “Freaks and Geeks” aside, in the real world there is nothing less interesting than watching potheads get stoned.

A life of abstinence, however, can be hilarious, which is why comedies like “Mom” and “Catastrophe,” with all of their off-color, self-effacing wit, so successfully chronicle the journey of the addict in recovery. On “Mom,” Emmy-winner Allison Janney and Anna Faris play a sober mother-daughter team coping with booze cravings, romantic dysfunction, and the daily challenges of being sober physically — but not necessarily emotionally. On Amazon’s “Catastrophe,” Rob Delaney nails the part of an affectionate and loving but also conventionally narcissistic man-child who quit drinking after he “shit at [his] sister’s wedding.”

What’s especially refreshing about both of these shows is that they debunk the myth that once you get clean you’re suddenly “fixed.” Instead, they’re predicated on the fact that addiction is a disease that people live with for their entire lives, whether or not they’re actively getting wasted. What’s so commendable about “Mom” especially is that it examines what most people do not understand — that sobriety can be the most difficult aspect of alcoholism.

On the flip side, Freeform’s now-canceled “Recovery Road” was a show that missed the mark entirely, serving up a candy-coated rendering of rehab that belies most everything we know to be true. The series’ collective flaws are best summed up in one line, said by a high school guidance counselor to Maddie (Jessica Sula), a strung-out party girl she’s threatening with expulsion unless she moves into a sober living facility: “You can go to school by day and spend your evenings getting sober.” As if sobriety is a part-time job. Maddie tries to keep her situation a secret, and the surrounding adults seem Ok with that — even though honesty is one of the primary tenets of recovery. You can tell what the network was trying to do — create a show about addiction that parents could watch with their kids. But that’s a pointless task if it doesn’t ring true.

“Shameless,” for all of its outlandishness — patriarchal drunk Frank Gallagher (Emmy-nominated William H. Macy) has survived liver failure, a kitchen fire, and being tossed over a bridge into a river — is the series that perhaps most accurately captures the pervasiveness with which alcoholism wreaks havoc on a family. Everybody suffers. Everybody is powerless. Denial rips through the family line. Whether they are using or not, all of the Gallagher kids are living with the –ism.

When it comes down to it, no fictional TV series can definitively capture the brutal truth of how drugs and alcohol destroy people’s lives. Rather, it’s documentaries like Steven Okazaki’s brilliant and harrowing “Heroin: Cape Cod” — which focuses on eight young addicts — that paint the starkest, most blistering, and most realistic portrait of addiction. Because addiction isn’t pretty, and it’s often not something that you want to tune in to watch.

»

- Malina Saval

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How 'Black-ish,' 'Transparent' and More Comedy Series Tackle Racism: "We Just Can't Run From Having These Conversations"

9 June 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Every couple of decades, sitcoms get serious. Back in the 1970s, race relations became a primetime topic on All in the Family, and Bea Arthur had TV's first abortion in an episode of Maude. During the '90s, Murphy Brown helped make single motherhood a front-page issue. Now, in 2016, it's happening again, with such super-topical issues as police shootings, gay marriage, xenophobia and transgender bathroom politics being played for laughs (mostly) on broadcast and streaming comedies. When ABC's Black-ish aired an episode in which the Johnson children asked their parents about the police shootings in Ferguson, Mo.,

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- Gregory Ellwood

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2016 Emmy Contenders: Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy

2 June 2016 3:00 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

At this point, the question isn’t whether Julia Louis-Dreyfus will score her fifth consecutive nomination for her role as President Selina Meyer on the HBO comedy “Veep,” but whether her winning streak will end. The actress has watched her character go from the titular vice president to leader of the free world, collecting a string of statues along the way. While Candice Bergen managed to score five wins for “Murphy Brown,” even she didn’t do it in a row.

But there are some new faces poised to take the prize this year, from Golden Globe winner Rachel Bloom (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”) to Amy Schumer (“Inside Amy Schumer”), who is on a hot streak herself. In addition, many actresses who have never scored a nom are coming off great second seasons, including Ellie Kemper (“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”), Gina Rodriguez (“Jane the Virgin”), Tracee Ellis Ross (“Black-ish”) and Constance Wu (“Fresh Off the Boat. »

- Variety Staff

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Beth Howland Dies: Actress Who Played Vera On ‘Alice’ Was 74

25 May 2016 11:23 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Beth Howland, who earned four Golden Globe nominations for her regular supporting role on the long-running CBS sitcom Alice, has died. She was 74. Her husband, Murphy Brown actor Charles Kimbrough, told the Associated Press that Howland died December 31 of lung cancer in Santa Monica. She began her career at 16 on Broadway in the original 1960 production of Bye Bye Birdie starring Dick Van Dyke. Howland appeared in four other Main Stem shows during the next decade then… »

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Alice's Vera, Beth Howland, Dead at 74

25 May 2016 7:38 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Beth Howland, who is fondly remembered as high-strung waitress Vera on the 1970s/80s CBS sitcom Alice, died on Dec. 31 at the age of 74, following a battle with lung cancer. Howland’s husband, Murphy Brown vet Charles Kimbrough, told the New York Times that he refrained from announcing her death earlier, in keeping with her wishes.

Howland won the role of Vera Louise Gorman (which was played by Valerie Cutin in the 1974 Martin Scorsese film Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore) after a Warner Bros. TV exec saw her play anxious bride-to-be Amy in Stephen Sondheim’s Broadway musical Company. »

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Morley Safer, Legendary ’60 Minutes’ Reporter, Dies at 84

19 May 2016 9:10 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Emmy-winning newsman Morley Safer, one of the first reporters to convey the brutality of the Vietnam War to America’s TV viewers and a mainstay on “60 Minutes” for 46 years, has died, CBS News reports. He was 84.

Safer annouced his retirement just last week.

A longtime correspondent as well as a writer for documentary series such as “CBS Reports,” Safer described his legacy to broadcast journalism as “a pretty solid body of work that emphasized the words, emphasized ideas and the craft of writing for this medium.” The 12-time winner of News and Documentary Emmys, including a lifetime achievement award in 2003, from 39 nominations also won three Peabody Awards.

He left an indelible impression on broadcast journalism in 1965 with a key report from Vietnam broadcast on “CBS Evening News With Walter Cronkite.” The report depicted Safer accompanying U.S. Marines on a military action into a complex of villages called Cam Ne. »

- Laura Haefner

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The 2016 TV Pilots Most Likely To Become Series (Photos)

9 May 2016 6:14 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Network executives are pondering which TV pilots to pick for their fall schedules. Here are some shows most likely to get a nod. Candice Bergen was the star of the classic sitcom “Murphy Brown.” Now she’s back in ABC’s “Pearl,” about a strong-willed matriarch battling cancer as well as her family members. Fox is going to try a reboot of “The Exorcist,” the 1970s horror classic about demonic possession, this time with Oscar winner Geena Davis in the starring role. “Parenthood” writer-producer Jason Katims is behind “Bunker Hill,” a new CBS medical drama about a cutting-edge hospital and the mysterious tech titan. »

- Scott Collins

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 33 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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