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A Better Tomorrow II (1987) Poster

Trivia

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John Woo's first cut of Better Tomorrow 2 was about 160 minutes long. Woo and producer Hark Tsui had disagreements over the focus of the film. Tsui felt that the film should focus more on the Lung, while Woo's original version focused more on characters Ken and Kit.

Hark also insisted that the film should be shortened to a commercially viable length, which in Hong Kong is considered under 120 minutes, so theatre owners could show the film at least eight times a day. Woo refused to cut the film down and when he and Hark couldn't agree about the focus of the film and how it should be re-edited, Hark went and started secretly re-editing the film himself, since he had equal control with the editing of the film along with three other editors (Woo being the fifth editor). At the same time when Hark would cut some parts out Woo would went and also secretly put the missing parts back in. With only a week remaining before movie was to be released in theaters, and with pressure from the studio and distributors to trim the film down, Woo and Hark agreed to send the movie to "Cinema City Editing Unit", which meant that they sent each reel of the film to one of Cinema City's editors, who would then go to work on his particular reel. There was no overall supervision whatsoever by either Woo or Hark. Each of these editors just cut things out as they saw fit, then they returned the reels. What they came up with is now the official released version of the film.

When Woo saw this final version of the film which was 105 minutes long in the theatre for the first time, he was so shocked to see how badly it was re-edited that he disowned the film and till this day only part which he said he considers to be his work is the final shootout sequence. According to Woo, reasons for why lot of the sequences with Yun-Fat Chow and Leslie Cheung which he really liked were completely cut out and why his original version focused more on them is because he realized while filming that parts with Dean Shek's character wouldn't work. But Hark insisted on having Shek in the film which is another reason why he wanted for lot of his scenes to be left in the final cut and lot of other actors' scenes to be cut out. Woo's director's cut was only shown once to film executives in Hong Kong, before all the re-editing problems began.

The five and a half minutes long Hong Kong trailer for the film is the only source to see glimpses of some deleted scenes; Blood covered Kit being brutally beaten up, Kit seeing his wife while still having injuries from the beating on his face, Ken and Lung playing with the bird.
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There is a scene in the film where we see a group of kids wearing long coats. The previous film in this series was so popular that young people in Hong Kong dressed like the lead character and the scene comments on that trend.
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This film was notorious for stunt mishaps. Yun-Fat Chow was almost blown up when the explosion outside the mansion door being more powerful than expected. Some of his hair was singed, and he was blasted forward. The shot in the film is his real reaction. Director Ronny Yu was the stunt double in the warehouse scene. He wrenched his back after slipping on water puddle while carrying Dean Shek. Also the stuntman for Leslie Cheung who performed the speedboat jump landed incorrectly and broke his foot.
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Includes incidental music from the films Parole de flic (1985) and 52 Pick-Up (1986).
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Lung Si is meant to be an older, retired crime boss who had previously employed Sung Tse-Ho. In reality, Lung Ti is nearly 4 years older than Dean Shek.
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The anime series Cowboy Bebop (1998) has many references to the film series, including the last fight between Spike and Vicious in Cowboy Bebop: The Real Folk Blues: Part 2 (1999) which parallels the final shoot out.
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Director Trademark 

John Woo: [guns] Yun-Fat Chow uses a gun in each hand.
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