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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 38 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


De Palma review

22 September 2016 3:37 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Published Date  Friday, September 23, 2016 - 06:17

If director Brian De Palma was sometimes criticised for settling for style over substance in his thrillers, this feature-length documentary about his career is reassuringly basic in its approach. Barring archive footage and one, solitary moment, directors Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow divide their retrospective between sequences from De Palma’s movies and interviews with the filmmaker himself, seated in front of a grey fireplace.

It’s the kind of move that could be regarded as lazy or tentative in some circumstances, but Baumbach and Paltrow are shrewd enough to recognise that a director known for his technical flourishes needs room to breathe; and besides, De Palma and his movies are interesting enough subjects that they hardly need further embellishment.

Even De Palma’s structure is straightforward: we start at the beginning, when the future director of Carrie and The Untouchables was a kid, »

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Movie Review – De Palma (2016)

22 September 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

De Palma, 2016

Directed by Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow.

Synopsis:

A documentary exploring the life, work and influences behind the films of Brian De Palma

Brian De Palma may be popular among cineliterate enthusiasts but he’s never had the same popularity elsewhere. When you list his movies, it’s easy to imagine audiences being taken aback by the sheer quantity of classics he has under his belt. Carrie, Scarface and Mission Impossible are difficult to group together, spanning vividly different genres, and yet they fall under the impressive banner of Brian De Palma. De Palma, jointly directed by Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow, is primarily an interview, but it fills the screen with footage from each of his movies (and the classics that inspired them) and weaves this chronological canon together effortlessly.

Discussing each and every film in his eclectic filmography, De Palma is affably honest. He’s outspoken »

- Simon Columb

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10th Anniversary: The Black Dahlia

15 September 2016 1:12 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

David looks back at Brian de Palma's wildest film, ten years on from its release.

The Black Dahlia is a curious artefact. It is likely to be remembered simply by virtue of being in the catalogue of Brian de Palma, even if the film’s quality is negligible compared to his biggest hitters Carrie and The Untouchables. When compared to the other famous James Ellroy adaptation, the Oscar-winning L.A. Confidential (which celebrates its own birthday, its 19th, in just a few days), de Palma’s effort certainly pales. In the career of cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond (the film’s sole Oscar nominee), it’s likely to be a footnote in the late man’s incredible career, coming after his work with Spielberg, Cimino and Altman. The film’s stars probably took a year at most to write it off as a failure on all their parts.

Yet the film »

- Dave

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De Palma documentary gets a UK poster and trailer

13 September 2016 9:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Noah Baumbach (Mistress in America) and Jake Paltrow’s (The Good Night) acclaimed documentary De Palma – which explores the life and work of the legendary filmmaker Brian De Palma – is set for release here in the UK next week, and StudioCanal has debuted a new poster and trailer for the film; check them out here…

One of the most talented, influential, and iconoclastic filmmakers of all time, Brian De Palma’s career started in the 60s and has included such acclaimed and diverse films as Carrie, Dressed to Kill, Blow Out, Scarface, The Untouchables, Carlito’s Way, and Mission: Impossible. In this lively, illuminating and unexpectedly moving documentary, directors Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow engage in a personal and candid discussion with De Palma, exploring not only his life and work but also his singular approach to the craft of filmmaking and his remarkable experiences navigating the film business, from »

- Gary Collinson

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Happy Birthday Sean Connery: Our Top 5 Favourite Roles

25 August 2016 12:00 PM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Happy Birthday Sean Connery: Our Top 5 Favourite RolesHappy Birthday Sean Connery: Our Top 5 Favourite RolesScott Goodyer8/25/2016 2:00:00 Pm

The iconic Scottish actor best known for playing James Bond turns 85 today!

There's something about this Oscar-winning actor. Yes, he's handsome and has that Scottish accent we all love, but there's something else. He's got that lasting star power about him - a real Hollywood icon.

So in honour of Sean Connery's birthday, we've put together a list of some of our favourite of his roles! 1. The Hunt for Red October This 1990 spy thriller is about the Red October, a nuclear soviet submarine whose captain (played by Connery) breaks rank and decides on his own command to take the submarine to Us waters! What are his intentions? To defect, or launch a missile attack?  Well, that's up to CIA analyst Jack Ryan (played by Alec Baldwin) to discover the truth. »

- Scott Goodyer

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‘The Untouchables’: Brian De Palma’s Definitive Prohibition-Era Drama

2 August 2016 11:11 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Prohibition’s legacy will always be a period of nearly unprecedented crime. What began as an experiment meant to cure the social and moral ills of a beleaguered nation turned into a reason for the worst of human nature to run wild in the streets. Deception, corruption, violence, and vice ruled the day. As with any such moment in history, certain figures became elevated to the level of myth, and totems from the time became cultural touchstones that would endure for ages. Al Capone. Elliot Ness. Tommy guns. Fedoras. Each of these brings up a specific idea in the mind of the populace and can, by itself, set the imagination on fire.

Who better, then, to create the definitive modern tale of the Prohibition Era than the director who has turned so many other people and items into pop culture totems? Brian De Palma has spun gold out of the »

- Brian Roan

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‘Wise Guys’: Brian De Palma’s Self-Proclaimed “Bastard Child”

21 July 2016 12:49 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Is this Brian De Palma’s only dull film? Very possibly yes. Released in 1986, this post-SNL Joe Piscopo vehicle (you read that correctly) feels incredibly standard. The plot concerns two low-level gangsters, Moe and Harry (Piscopo and Danny DeVito, respectively), who lose their mob boss’ money at the race track. Said mob boss (Dan Hedaya) orders the two schlubs to kill each other. Hijinks ensue.

In spats, it plays like De Palma trying out slapstick. Select moments — a close-up shot that pulls out to reveal Harry being drowned inside of a fish tank or Moe testing out a bulletproof suit jacket for his boss — highlight the fascinating hybrid of De Palma’s visual style with broad, studio comedy. If only it worked a bit more frequently throughout the film’s bloated 100-minute runtime. One can only ponder what additional mileage the director may have achieved from DeVito’s deliciously terrible hairpiece, »

- The Film Stage

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Carrie – 4th Anniversay Collectors Bluray Coming from Scream Factory

3 July 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Horror News | See recent Horror News news »

Carrie   The 40th Anniversary Of The Iconic Film To Be Celebrated With A 2-disc Collector’S Edition Blu-ray™ Set Arriving October 11, 2016 Los Angeles, CA – In 1976, Carrie, the “absolutely spellbinding horror movie” (Roger Ebert) directed by Brian DePalma (Scarface, The Untouchables, Dressed to Kill) and based on the best-selling Stephen King novel, …

The post Carrie – 4th Anniversay Collectors Bluray Coming from Scream Factory first appeared on Hnn | Horrornews.net - Official News Site »

- Horrornews.net

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Fury (1978)

2 July 2016 9:59 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

1978 cast a long shadow in the world of horror. From Dawn of the Dead to Halloween, the landscape was abundant with everything from the socially relevant to the singularly terrifying, from superior remakes (Invasion of the Body Snatchers) to quirky haunted houses (The Evil). And then there’s the red headed stepchild that no one talks about: Brian DePalma’s The Fury. Frenetic, action packed, and gruesome, The Fury never gets the love from even most DePalma fanatics. What a shame – it’s never less than entertaining, and at its best showcases the director’s mesmerizing visual touch.

Released in March by Twentieth Century Fox, The Fury made $24 million against its $5.5 million budget. That’s good green, folks, and DePalma received favorable reviews,  still basking in a critical glow left over from his previous effort, Carrie (’76). So why is it so easily dismissed, ranked along the lines of efforts like Wise Guys, »

- Scott Drebit

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Carrie (1976) 40th Anniversary Collector’s Edition Blu-ray Announced by Scream Factory

29 June 2016 9:33 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

*Updated with the official press release.* This fall, Scream Factory will give horror fans an early Halloween treat with their 40th Anniversary Collector's Edition Blu-ray release of Brian De Palma's Carrie (1976).

Initially announced on EW, the Carrie Collector's Edition Blu-ray will be released on October 11th with a 4K scan of the movie's original negative and over three hours of extras for fans of the Stephen King adaptation to enjoy.

Similar to their 30th anniversary Return of the Living Dead Blu-ray, Scream Factory will also release Carrie in both a regular Collector's Edition and a Deluxe Limited Edition with an exclusive second slipcover, poster, and shipping of the film three weeks before its release.

Press Release: Los Angeles, CA - In 1976, Carrie, the “absolutely spellbinding horror movie” (Roger Ebert) directed by Brian DePalma (Scarface, The Untouchables, Dressed to Kill) and based on the best-selling Stephen King novel, premiered in theaters, »

- Derek Anderson

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Botelho on De Palma: My Favorite Set Pieces

27 June 2016 5:15 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

*Editor’s note – Our good bud, Derek Botelho (author of the Great book, The Argento Syndrome) is a big De Palma fan and really, aren’t we all? The guy has such a great filmography and Botelho thought he’d provide you fright fanatics with some of his favorite De Palma moments! –Jerry

With the recent release of the documentary De Palma by Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow, I got to thinking about why I admire De Palma’s work as much as I do. His technique is so singular and instantly recognizable, that to merely pass him off as a tin pot Hitchcock is doing both himself and Hitchcock a severe disservice. Whether it’s a ridiculously intricate spit screen, a rear projected psychic “flashback”, or a glorious whirling dervish around a room to tell you vital information, he’s always up to something, and never one to give »

- Derek Botelho

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Why I Can’t Love Brian De Palma (Though I’ve Always Wished I Could)

26 June 2016 4:50 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Back when I was a kid, and a lot more naïve about how the motion picture industry works, I had expectations of filmmakers that were completely unreasonable in their very reverence. If I saw a masterpiece, and then placed the person who directed it high atop my superstar pedestal of art heroes, I longed for him or her to go forward and make 10 or 20 more masterpieces (hey, why not!), and I always felt keenly disappointed if it didn’t work out that way. It was hard for me to wrap my head around the idea that even a movie as enthralling and visionary and apparently brilliantly orchestrated as “The Godfather” or “Nashville” was, among other things, a kind of fantastic accident: a coming together of elements that even the director isn’t always (or ever) in full control of.

But when it came to the art heroes who let me down, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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The Fury: Brian De Palma’s underrated, explosive movie

23 June 2016 8:58 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Director Brian De Palma followed Carrie with another gory vaunt into the supernatural. Here's why The Fury deserves a revisit...

When it comes to telekinesis and gory visual effects, the movie that generally springs to mind is David Cronenberg’s 1981 exploding head opus, Scanners. But years before that, American director Brian De Palma was liberally dowsing the screen with claret in his 1976 adaptation of Carrie - still rightly regarded as one of the best Stephen King adaptations made so far. A less widely remembered supernatural film from De Palma came two years after: De Palma’s supernatural thriller, The Fury.

The Fury was made with a more generous budget than Carrie, had a starrier cast (Kirk Douglas in the lead, John Cassavetes playing the villain), and it even did pretty well in financial terms. Yet The Fury had the misfortune of being caught in a kind of pincer movement between Carrie, »

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Film Review: ‘The Duel’

22 June 2016 6:13 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If you’re an actor playing someone who’s sick and twisted and evil, almost nothing will get you into character quite like a startling new look. That tends to be the case whether the look comes courtesy of the makeup department (think Heath Ledger’s Joker in “The Dark Knight” or Robert De Niro’s Al Capone in “The Untouchables”) or, simply, the electric razor. In “The Duel,” Woody Harrelson plays some sort of lethally charismatic Southern cult leader in the years after the Civil War, and his performance, which is all about being the kind of person no one can take their eyes off of, begins with his look: a shaved head, which seems like no big deal, but with matching shaved eyebrows (and occult tattooish squiggles in their place), all of which give Harrelson the appearance of a death-row psycho, or an overgrown baby, or maybe a strutting alien. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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The Summer of De Palma: A Career-Spanning Retrospective

17 June 2016 12:24 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Bringing up Brian De Palma as if he’s still some kind of marginalized or misunderstood figure is now heavily contentious, not just in the sense that “the discussion” has, with the presence of the Internet, become so heavily splintered that every figure has at least seem some form of reappraisal, but in that this is being discussed on the occasion of a new documentary and retrospectives in New York, Chicago, Austin, and Toronto (the lattermost of which this symposium will be timed to). Yes, the line has probably tipped past “divisive,” but that doesn’t mean there still isn’t room for debate.

It’s not hard to understand why De Palma’s work strikes a cord with a new cinephilia fixated on form and vulgarity. Though, in going film-by-film — taking us from political diatribes against America to gonzo horror to gangster films your parents watch to strange European »

- Ethan Vestby

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Explore Early Brian De Palma Shorts, a ‘Body Double’ Analysis, and Two Podcasts

9 June 2016 11:26 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

While this Brian De Palma fan can’t help but be a little annoyed that a career-spanning documentary from in-vogue filmmakers suddenly brings out more admiring notices and supportive voices — Passion was only three years ago, people! — said documentary, Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow’s De Palma, being so good makes this change of heart a little easier to swallow. And what opportunism it affords! Between my interview with the duo and a very exciting project that we’ll soon give you — and, of course, on the eve of this new film’s release — we give you some new items to explore.

The first two are easily grouped together: short films that, despite (or maybe because) having been produced early in his career and oscillating between fiction and documentary, evince key interests. (Voyeurism and scopophilia are among them, and the Eisensteinian montage that closes Woton’s Wake might — might — connect »

- Nick Newman

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Review: 'De Palma' is more than just a casual appraisal of a director's work

8 June 2016 1:10 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Brian De Palma taught me the value of film criticism. The first time one of his films really registered for me actively was when Dressed To Kill was released in 1980. I was starting to get bit by the film bug at the time, still in the early days of the sickness, and there were many ways I would digest films beyond just seeing movies. For films I wasn’t allowed to see, there were still ways for me to get some sense of the movie. Mad magazine, for example. Undressed To Kill was one of the movie parodies that ran in 1980, and it was a beat for beat riff off of the real film. I knew the story and I even knew the twist, since Mad was not shy about spoilers. It was easy to feel like you’d seen the film after you read a Mad parody, and I »

- Drew McWeeny

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Top Ridiculous Scenes In Movies

3 June 2016 6:14 AM, PDT | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

Some movies have been accused of stretching reality in order to keep their stories 'flowing', with viewers usually forced to suspend their disbelief. Then there are those moments when we admit there are plot devices in some serious films that are just plain ridiculous including "Kill Bill: Vol. 2", "Face/Off", "Run Lola Run", "The Untouchables" and "Rocky":

"Kill Bill: Vol. 2"

In writer/director Quentin Tarantino's 2004 revenge action thriller, 'Beatrice' (Uma Thurman) aka 'The Bride' embarks on a slice 'n dice rampage, to take out the 'Deadly Vipers' gang of killers that left her for dead on her wedding day.

Unfortunately her quest is near-terminated by 'Budd', the brother of 'Bill'  who shoots her in the chest and, with the help of 'Elle Driver', buries Bea in a coffin - alive.

Recalling the teachings of her master 'Pai Mei', and her struggles in punching through a wooden board, »

- Michael Stevens

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Watch: Brian De Palma Shot by Shot

1 June 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Metrograph begins their month-long Brian De Palma retrospective today, showing 28 of his films until June 30. Tiff is set to start their own slightly smaller De Palma retrospective, Split/Screen: The Cinema of Brian De Palma, on June 18, running until September 3. Now that his work is once again coming to the big screen, watch this shot-by-shot scene breakdown of the Union Station scene in The Untouchables, created by Antonios Papantoniou. Each shot is annotated with lens choice, running time, camera position et al. »

- Marc Nemcik

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CBS Home Entertertainment Trips Down Memory Lane with TV Sets

28 May 2016 11:29 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Summer is here and that means it’s time for racing in the streets. Or, if you’re not Bruce Springsteen, it’s a time for rest, relaxation, and binge watching. For nostalgia fans from various generations, CBS Home Entertainment is offering up a tasty assortment of television series from country comedy to ripped from the headlines detectives to our favorite science fiction.

The gem of the set may be the complete Blu-ray sets of Star Trek and Star Trek: The Next Generation, part of CBS and Paramount’s celebration of Gene Roddenberry’s creation.

Here are the details:

Beverly Hillbillies: The Official First Season

Release Date: April 26, 2016

Synopsis

Join the Clampett family as they move to the most famous zip code in the world when the seven-time Emmy award®-nominated series The Beverly Hillbillies: The Official First Season arrives on DVD April 26 from CBS Home Entertainment and Paramount Home Media Distribution. »

- ComicMix Staff

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 38 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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