7.0/10
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5 user 6 critic

Travelling North (1987)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama | 19 June 1987 (USA)
After their late-life marriage, a middle-aged Australian couple move to the countryside. Their life and tempestuous marriage is detailed.

Director:

Writers:

(play), (screenplay)
Reviews
5 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Henri Szeps ...
Saul
...
Freddie
Michele Fawdon ...
Helen
Diane Craig ...
Sophie
...
Joan
Drew Forsythe ...
Martin
John Gregg ...
Jim
Rob Steele ...
Syd
John Black ...
Alan
Roger Oakley ...
Stan
Joe MacColum ...
Boat owner
Nick Holland ...
Waiter
Steve Shaw ...
Estate agent
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Storyline

After their late-life marriage, a middle-aged Australian couple move to the countryside. Their life and tempestuous marriage is detailed.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A Journey into love, tears and laughter See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

19 June 1987 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Travelling Man  »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$214,722
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Third and final appearance by Graham Kennedy in a theatrical feature film which was an adaptation of a play by David Williamson. The first and second films were Don's Party (1976) and The Club (1980), both directed by Bruce Beresford. See more »

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User Reviews

Never Too Old
29 January 2017 | by See all my reviews

A middle aged widow and a widowed man twenty years her senior move up north from Melbourne to country Queensland, hoping for an idyllic life away from the hustle and bustle of the city, however, her longing for her family and his deteriorating health get in the way in this strongly acted Australian drama. Julia Blake and the legendary Leo McKern (in his third last big screen role) are both excellent throughout and deliver David Williamson's witty dialogue with perfect intonation and timing. "I may be old... I'm not defunct" insists McKern at one point, too proud to take his doctor's advice to "grow old gracefully", later on memorably threatening the doctor in order to obtain his medical books and research his heart condition for himself. The film is clearly more about McKern than Blake, which is not necessarily a bad thing since McKern has such a fascinatingly flawed character: one who can be quite boorish and yet who loves classical music, wide open skies and country drives. With all the focus on McKern though, it is often hard to see what Blake sees with him and why she chooses to stick by him as his worsening health makes him increasingly temperamental. Including scenes of their budding romance may have helped things out; then again, it is hard to argue with the effectiveness of the choice to focus on the aftermath of their romance: deciding to live together despite never knowing one another quite as well as they first thought. The question is then whether they were drawn together by mutual love or mutual loneliness. It is food for thought for sure.


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