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Is the most timely movie of 2015 a Blu-ray release of a movie from 1982?

  • Hitfix
Is the most timely movie of 2015 a Blu-ray release of a movie from 1982?
Based on a novel published in 1978, "The World According To Garp" was released in 1982, and yet watching the film on the recently-released Blu-ray from Warner Archive, I was struck by how timely and even urgent the material felt, and how much more adult and daring it is than most of the movies released by studios today. Not only do they not make them like this anymore, but I'd offer the opinion that they never really did. How can a film from 1978 have a better handle on the times we're living in right now than most of the films coming out this year? After all, much of John Irving's novel is a direct reaction to the late '70s and what Irving thought of the social landscape at that particular moment. How relevant could it be today, since we've obviously progressed so much since then? You'd be surprised. For those
See full article at Hitfix »

Quiz: All About Liam Neeson

  • Cineplex
Liam Neeson is back in Cineplex theatres this week reprising his role as ex-cia agent Bryan Mills in Taken 3, opening on Friday. The 6’4” Irish giant has grown into an action hero as of late thanks to movies like Taken, The A-Team, and The Grey, even though we’ll always have a soft spot for his more dramatic roles in Kinsey, Michael Collins and as widower Daniel in the dramedy Love Actually, just to name a few. We’ve been big fans of Neeson since way back in the 80s in movies like The Bounty and in Suspect where he plays a deaf-mute homeless man defended by attorney Cher when he is accused of murder. Sounds intriguing, right? And of course, who can forget his defining role as Oskar Schindler in 1993’s Schindler’s List.

Are you a fan of Liam Neeson? Test your Neeson knowledge in our quiz below!
See full article at Cineplex »

The 35 Greatest Murder Mystery Movies Ever Made

Murder mysteries are so commonplace on TV that each week offers seemingly dozens of them on police procedural series and detective shows. But in the movies, whodunits are surprisingly rare, and really good ones rarer still. There's really only a handful of movies that excel in offering the viewer the pleasure of solving the crime along with a charismatic sleuth, often with an all-star cast of suspects hamming it up as they try not to appear guilty.

One of the best was "Murder on the Orient Express," released 40 years ago this week, on November 24, 1974. Like many films adapted from Agatha Christie novels, this one featured an eccentric but meticulous investigator (in this case, Albert Finney as Belgian epicure Hercule Poirot), a glamorous and claustrophobic setting (here, the famous luxury train from Istanbul to Paris), and a tricky murder plot with an outrageous solution. The film won an Oscar for passenger
See full article at Moviefone »

Exclusive 1:1 Interview: A Walk Among the Tombstones Star Liam Neeson!

  • JoBlo
Liam Neeson has long been a favorite of mine. All the way back to his performance in Suspect . and well before . he has proven to be one of the most powerful actors working in the business. The past few years of course he has become a modern day action hero with Taken and he kicked serious wolf ass in The Grey. He has even charmed the young ones with his terrific work in The Lego Movie. In A Walk Among The Tombstones, Neeson is at his best. In this thrillingly suspenseful film he creates a...
See full article at JoBlo »

Liam Neeson on using his 'Taken' clout to get 'Walk Among The Tombstones' made

  • Hitfix
Liam Neeson on using his 'Taken' clout to get 'Walk Among The Tombstones' made
"Excalibur" was a formative theatrical experience for me. It was one of the first R-rated films I specifically decided I wanted to see in a theater. I'd seen other R-rated films before that, but always at random and because someone else decided I was going to see it. With "Excalibur," I was crazy to see it, and the film landed on me like a ton of bricks. Surreal, violent, beautiful, explicit, and for a mythology nut, seeing how the film dealt with each of the characters, each of the Arthurian archetypes, I was in love. One of the guys who made an impression in the film was a young Liam Neeson, and for the rest of the '80s, he racked up a number of performances where, good film or bad, he made an impression. How could he not? No one else looked like him. Slightly over eight feet tall,
See full article at Hitfix »

8 Kickass Courtroom Performances From Legendary Actresses, In Honor Of Doma's Day With Scotus

We've all got to do our part to help with the Scotus situation today, kids. I know I'm doing mine: Here are eight fabulous female performanes in courtroom movies to inspire you for the day ahead. Even if they drive younuts, you still qualify to look glamorously insane like Frances Farmer.

1. Meryl Streep in Kramer vs. Kramer

Joanna Kramer ditched her family not because she was bored of parenting (which I would've completely understood), but because her despair was so significant that she felt it best to remove herself from the home she shared with her obnoxious husband and tolerable son. Later, when she wanted custody of the scamp, she delivered a tearful monologue about painting clouds on bedroom walls and the misery of the Kramer household, concluding with the defiant line, "I am his mother." Meryl famously wrote most of this great soliloquy, and knowing Meryl's talents, she probably also sewed her own costume,
See full article at The Backlot »

Liam Neeson Confirmed for The Dark Knight Rises

It was rumored earlier this year that Liam Neeson would return to reprise his role as Ra's al Ghul in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight Rises. He was spotted on the set of the film, but until today there's been no confirmation of his involvement. Warner Bros. made the announcement in the production notes for the film that says,

Neeson next appears in Peter Berg's actioner "Battleship," and he also will be seen in Christopher Nolan's much-anticipated action thriller "The Dark Knight Rises.

It makes perfect sense to me that his character would be back as this Batman finale as we've heard Nolan would bring everything back around in full circle in the franchise. I can't wait to see what this film has in store for us! I just can't help but think it's going to be mind blowing.

Josh Pence is playing Ra's al Ghul in the films flashbacks.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

You’re Re-Hired! A.J. Cook Talks Candidly About What Brought Her Back into the Fold and What Fans Can Expect From Jj During Criminal Minds Season 7

If J.J. Jareau is caught smiling a little more than usual during tonight’s Criminal Minds, it’s for good reason. Her portrayer A. J. Cook — who fans need not be reminded was unceremoniously fired from the show a little over a year ago — is back. What’s more, she’s been promoted to profiler. So just how does it feel to return to the series that turned her into a trending topic on Twitter and what’s in store for fans of the actress as Criminal Minds kicks off its much-anticipated seventh season tonight? We recently had the pleasure of talking to the fellow Canadian to find out just that. See for yourself, after the jump.

Since we feel like the story of your initial exit has been already covered, we wanted to ask what your first reaction was to getting the phone call that Criminal Minds wanted you back.
See full article at The TV Addict »

Liam Neeson interview: Unknown, Taken 2, Krull, Star Wars, Darkman and more

With action thriller Unknown out in cinemas this week, we chat to actor Liam Neeson about his greatest geek films and the possibility of a Taken sequel…

I'm actually at a slight loss as to how to introduce Liam Neeson. He's a magnificent actor, who's been in my life for decades, always defying expectations and as adept at portraying heartbreak in the likes of Love Actually as he is at breaking bones in Taken.

His geek credentials run far and deep, from John Boorman's Excalibur back in 1981, as one of the heroic thieves in the mighty Krull, playing the redneck brother to Patrick Swayze and Bill Paxton in Next Of Kin, as the tormented Peyton Westlake in Darkman, before a tremendous dramatic run including Schindler's List, Nell, Rob Roy and Michael Collins led him to become a Jedi Knight in The Phantom Menace.

The list of Neeson's towering performances is incredible,
See full article at Den of Geek »

News Shorts: January 10th 2011

New photos from The Rite, Sanctum, The Housemaid, The Mechanic, No Strings Attached, Evangelion 2.0: You Can (Not) Advance, The Way Back, The Dilemma, The Green Hornet and My Idiot Brother.

Impressive banners for Sucker Punch and Kung Fu Panda 2 along with one-sheets for Kaboom, Burning Palms and Margin Call. Also various merchandising tie-in artwork is out for Green Lantern.

Two bits of "Captain America: The First Avenger" image-related news today - a shot of Hugo Weaving in character as Red Skull (pre-makeup) holding the Cosmic Cube is is here, while apparent concept art of Red Skull after the transformation is here.

An apparent description of the teaser trailer for "X-Men: First Class" has emerged at The Daily Blam.

"Oscar-nominated English filmmaker Peter Yates, who directed such cult hits as "The Deep," "Bullitt," "Krull," "The Hot Rock," "The Dresser," "Suspect" and "Breaking Away", died Sunday in London at the
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Peter Yates obituary

Versatile British film director known for Bullitt, The Deep and Breaking Away

The director Peter Yates, who has died aged 81, helped Steve McQueen achieve iconic status with the cop movie Bullitt (1968), enjoyed a massive box-office success with The Deep (1977) and made one of the most beguiling of all youth movies in Breaking Away (1979). He maintained a steady career throughout five decades, initially in the theatre and then in mainstream cinema, but he suffered the critical neglect so often accorded those who tackle a variety of subjects and genres and become known, somewhat disparagingly, as journeyman directors.

Pauline Kael described him as a competent director "with a good serviceable technique for integrating staged movie action into documentary city locations". David Thomson suggested that, in America, Yates had "done nothing more profound than send hubcaps careering around corners". Bullitt's famous San Francisco car chase (later revived by Ford as part of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Peter Yates Dead at 82

Four time Oscar nominee Peter Yates passed away on January 9th at the age of 82 after a long battle with an undisclosed illness. He directed and produced several films over the years, starting his career in 1963 with Summer Holiday.

After working as a director for television shows, he moved to the crime triller Robbery in 1967, which grew into a very impressive career. Some of the films he was best known for was Bullitt, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, Breaking Away, Suspect, and The Dresser. And while it doesn't hold up today, he also directed one of my favorite films from my youth, Krull.
See full article at Get The Big Picture »

Rip Peter Yates

  • TheMovieBit
Peter Yates, director of the classic cop tale Bullitt, has died. Yates passed away January 9th, 2011 in London, aged 81. Yates' work also included the sci-fi Krull, The Deep and the thriller, Suspect. Working from 1963 right up to 2004, the director has enjoyed a long and healthy career and leaves behind one of the most kick-ass car chases in cinema history. For anyone who hasn't seen it, right now would be a great time to pick up Bullitt, featuring the legendary Steve McQueen.
See full article at TheMovieBit »

Peter Yates 1928-2011

Well, last week we passed along the unfortunate news that Pete Postlethwaite had died [1], and now this week Hollywood has lost another Pete. Peter Yates, director of such classics as Bullitt, Murphy's War, and the Jay Cheel favourite Krull has passed away after a long illness. He also directed The Friends of Eddie Coyle, which turned up at the top of Ben Affleck's list of best heist films [2] just a few days ago. He was 82 years old. Yates had a long and fruitful career and directed a wide variety of films in a number of different genres starting with Summer Holiday starring Cliff Richard and The Shadows in 1963. In addition to some of the classic crime films for which is best known, he also directed Peter Benchley's The Deep, Suspect starring Cher and Dennis Quaid, Year of the Comet, and Mother, Jugs & Speed starring Bill Cosby, Harvey Keitel and Raquel Welch.
See full article at FilmJunk »

Bullitt director Peter Yates dies aged 82

British director of Summer Holiday, Breaking Away and Steve McQueen film Bullitt has died after long illness

Peter Yates, the four-time Oscar-nominated British director of Bullitt, Breaking Away and The Dresser, has died in London after a long illness. He was 82.

A graduate of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art whose first film as a director was the lightweight Cliff Richard and the Shadows vehicle Summer Holiday, Yates made his name with the action-packed 1967 crime thriller Robbery, a dramatisation of the great train robbery. Hollywood beckoned, and Yates's first Us effort, Bullitt, featured the first car chase in the modern style, with star Steve McQueen himself taking the wheel for a large part of a bravura extended sequence in which his Ford Mustang slaloms and chicanes through the streets of San Francisco.

Academy recognition came later in Yates's career with the 1979 coming-of-age tale Breaking Away. The comedy about four working-class
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Peter Yates, Four-Time Oscar Nominee, Dead at 81

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Movie News, Cinematical

There's just something about the "old guard" UK film directors that makes them so memorable. A filmmaker like Peter Yates might not be mentioned all that much these days, but to a certain generation of film fanatics his was always known as a reliable name. That's not to say that all his films were classics, but even on the lighter or even sillier projects, there was a competence and confidence that most British filmmakers exhibit. Call it work ethic or class, but Peter Yates was one of those guys. The 81-year-old passed away over the weekend in his native London.

Oscar-nominated twice as a director (for the excellent 'Breaking Away' and the unfairly forgotten 'The Dresser') and then once again as a producer on both films, Mr. Yates had a colorful career of hits and misses, but one never got the
See full article at Moviefone »

Peter Yates, Four-Time Oscar Nominee, Dead at 81

Peter Yates, Four-Time Oscar Nominee, Dead at 81
Filed under: Movie News, Cinematical

There's just something about the "old guard" UK film directors that makes them so memorable. A filmmaker like Peter Yates might not be mentioned all that much these days, but to a certain generation of film fanatics his was always known as a reliable name. That's not to say that all his films were classics, but even on the lighter or even sillier projects, there was a competence and confidence that most British filmmakers exhibit. Call it work ethic or class, but Peter Yates was one of those guys. The 81-year-old passed away over the weekend in his native London.

Oscar-nominated twice as a director (for the excellent 'Breaking Away' and the unfairly forgotten 'The Dresser') and then once again as a producer on both films, Mr. Yates had a colorful career of hits and misses, but one never got the
See full article at Cinematical »

Peter Yates, a director of distinction, passes away

Late Sunday evening the news broke on Nikki Finke's Deadline that director Peter Yates had passed away. He was 82 and suffering from what the site only refers to as a "long illness."

Yates was one of those names on the periphery of becoming an A-list director, fully competent in his craft but never quite breaking through into the next level. While I'm on the border of speaking ill of the man's work (and I truly don't mean to do a disservice to his memory), as I look back at his resume, few of Yates' films ever stood out and most feel trapped in the eras in which they were made. Still, even though several of his films themselves aren't memorable or well regarded today, I always felt that Yates was able to impart a certain kind of classiness and sophistication to his work. That made his pictures stand out from
See full article at Corona's Coming Attractions »

Bullitt/Krull Director Peter Yates is Dead

Bullitt/Krull Director Peter Yates is Dead
Four time Oscar-nominated British director Peter Yates has passed away at the age of 82. Deadline [1] reports that he died in London after a long illness. Yates is probably best known for the 1968 Steve McQueen film Bullitt, the 1983 Oscar-nominated drama The Dresser, the 1983 cult fantasy film Krull, the 1977 horror/thriller The Deep, and the 1979 sports drama Breaking Away. His filmography also includes Curtain Call, The Run of the Country, Roommates, Year of the Comet, An Innocent Man, The House on Carroll Street, Suspect, Eleni, The Dresser, Eyewitness, Mother Jugs & Speed, For Pete's Sake, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, The Hot Rock, Murphy's War and John and Mary, and Robbery. I've included trailers for some of these films after the jump. Please feel free to post in remembrance of Yates (and the movies he directed) in the comments below. Bullitt Krull Breaking Away The Deep The Dresser The Hot Rock [1] http://www.
See full article at Slash Film »

Peter Yates: 1928-2011

Peter Yates, the man who brought us Bullitt, Breaking Away, The Dresser and the mighty Krull, has died at the age of 82.

Some really sad news here to start the week. Peter Yates, the director of Bullitt, Summer Holiday, Breaking Away and The Dresser, has died at the age of 82.

Nominated for four Oscars across his extensive career, Yates started off working with Cliff Richard before taking on a diverse collection of movies across his 40 years of directing movies and TV.

He also helmed a real Den Of Geek favourite, Krull (a film that this writer enjoyed more than once at the cinema), as well as episodes of the TV shows The Saint and Danger Man.

Plus, spare a moment for the likes of Robbery, The Hot Rock, The Deep and Suspect. Few directors can jump genres convincingly, yet over the course of his career, that's just what Yates managed.
See full article at Den of Geek »
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