Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story (1987) - News Poster

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Six of the best ... TV melodramas

Spoof mini-series The Spoils of Babylon is coming soon, so what finer time to tip our hats to the epic, emotional heavyweight classics of the genre from the 70s and 80s?

This Saturday sees the start of star-studded parody The Spoils of Babylon on Fox, in which Will Ferrell, Kristen Wiig, Tim Robbins and Tobey Maguire take aim at the epic (and epically cheesy) American mini-series of the late 70s and early 80s. In preparation, here's our guide to six of the best original shows. (Note: yes, Roots is a 70s mini-series, but it's also a serious drama and too good for inclusion here.)

Rich Man, Poor Man (1976)

The daddy of them all. This adaptation of Irwin Shaw's bestseller told the tale of two opposite (and opposed) brothers, good boy Rudy (Peter Strauss) and bad boy Tom (a show-stopping Nick Nolte). There had been other mini-series before Rich Man,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Charles Jarrott obituary

British-born director known for Anne of the Thousand Days and Mary, Queen of Scots

The film and television director Charles Jarrott, who has died of cancer aged 83, began his career during a golden period of British TV drama, working on Armchair Theatre and The Wednesday Play in the 1960s alongside writers and directors such as Ken Loach, Dennis Potter and David Mercer. Both series were presided over by the Canadian producer Sydney Newman, who encouraged original work – what he called "agitational contemporaneity" – and had an astonishing impact. But in 1969 Jarrott's career took a different turn when he left for Hollywood, thereby increasing his income a hundredfold, while having to contend with far less adventurous material. His best films were his first, two Elizabethan costume dramas, Anne of the Thousand Days and Mary, Queen of Scots, enlivened by the Oscar-nominated performances of Richard Burton (Henry VIII), Geneviève Bujold (Anne Boleyn) and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Charles Jarrott obituary

British-born director known for Anne of the Thousand Days and Mary, Queen of Scots

The film and television director Charles Jarrott, who has died of cancer aged 83, began his career during a golden period of British TV drama, working on Armchair Theatre and The Wednesday Play in the 1960s alongside writers and directors such as Ken Loach, Dennis Potter and David Mercer. Both series were presided over by the Canadian producer Sydney Newman, who encouraged original work – what he called "agitational contemporaneity" – and had an astonishing impact. But in 1969 Jarrott's career took a different turn when he left for Hollywood, thereby increasing his income a hundredfold, while having to contend with far less adventurous material. His best films were his first, two Elizabethan costume dramas, Anne of the Thousand Days and Mary, Queen of Scots, enlivened by the Oscar-nominated performances of Richard Burton (Henry VIII), Geneviève Bujold (Anne Boleyn) and
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Farrah Fawcett Dies After Battle with Cancer

Farrah Fawcett, one of the original Charlie's Angels cast members and the best-selling pinup girl in history, died this morning in Santa Monica, Calif, three years after being diagnosed with cancer. Actor Ryan O'Neal, with whom she'd had an on-again/off-again relationship for nearly 30 years, was at her side. Fawcett was 62.

The Corpus Christi native and University of Texas at Austin alumnus had become relatively famous in the early 1970s doing modeling and guest spots on various TV shows, but it was her role as one of the three sexy crime fighters in Charlie's Angels, in 1976, that made her a superstar. The iconic poster of her in a red swimsuit sold 12 million copies -- the most ever for a poster -- and adorned teenage boys' bedrooms all across America. When she appeared mostly nude in Playboy in 1995, at age 48, it became the magazine's bestselling issue of the 1990s.

She left
See full article at Cinematical »

Goodnight, Angel

In sad but expected news, Farrah Fawcett has passed away at age sixty-two after a long and valiant fight with cancer. She was one of the most iconic sex symbols of all time, as well as a sadly underrated actress.

Most people will name the camp TV classic Charlie's Angels as her biggest claim to fame, but she was only on the show for one season (as well as a few guest appearances). Because of her enormous sex appeal, it was difficult for her to be taken seriously as an actress, but that changed in 1984 with a performance that would redefine her career.

Small Sacrifices/The Burning Bed

Like Cher in her Oscar-nominated dramatic turn in Silkwood, Farrah shocked the world with her gritty, Emmy-nominated performance as a battered wife in The Burning Bed. She would appear in a string of dramatic roles through the eighties, including Extremities, Nazi Hunter: The Beate Klarsfeld Story,
See full article at The Backlot »

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