Opera (1987) - News Poster

(1987)

News

Blu-ray Review – Phenomena: Limited Edition (1985)

Phenomena, 1985.

Directed by Dario Argento.

Starring Jennifer Connelly, Donald Pleasence, Daria Nicolodi, Patrick Bauchau, Fiore Argento, Federica Mastroianni, and Michele Soavi.

Synopsis:

A teenage girl with telepathic abilities moves to a Swiss boarding school and uses her gift to communicate with insects in order to solve a spate of murders.

If something is worth doing then it is worth doing more than once, and so Italian horror maestro Dario Argento begins another movie with a young woman arriving at an exclusive school in a foreign country just as strange events begin to occur. 1977 saw this approach set up Argento’s spooky masterpiece Suspiria and he used it again in 1985 for Phenomena (a.k.a. Creepers in the Us) as actor’s daughter Jennifer (Jennifer ConnellyLabyrinth) arrives at a very expensive Swiss boarding school during a troubled time for the locals as a killer is on the loose. However, the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Definitive Foreign Language Horror Films: 30-21

  • SoundOnSight
What is it about foreign horror films that makes them more interesting than so many English language horror films? You would have to think that the language barrier makes it more terrifying; people screaming is already difficult, but speaking a language you don’t understand can only make it worse. So, why are the remakes typically so bad? On this portion of the list, we are treated to a few of the more upsetting films in the canon – one movie I wouldn’t wish for anyone to see, a few that blazed the trail for many more, and one that I would elevate above the horror genre into its own little super-genre.

30. Janghwa, Hongryeon (2003)

English Title: A Tale of Two Sisters

Directed by: Kim Ji-woon

Another excellent Korean horror film America had to remake to lesser results. 2003’s A Tale of Two Sisters is just one of many film adaptations of the folktale,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

200 Greatest Horror Films (130-121)

  • SoundOnSight
Special Mention: Misery

Directed by Rob Reiner

Screenplay by William Goldman

1990, USA

Genre: Thriller

Elevated by standout performances from James Caan and Kathy Bates, Misery remains one of the best Stephen King adaptations to date. Director Rob Reiner is clearly more interested in the dark humour and humanity than the gory detail in King’s novel, but make no mistake about it, Misery is a tough watch soaked in sharp dialogue, a brooding atmosphere, and disturbing bodily harm inflicted on James Caan by sweet old Kathy Bates. I can still feel his pain.

129. Black Sabbath (Three Faces of Fear)

Mario Bava and Salvatore Billitteri

Written by Ennio De Concini and Mario Serandrei

Italy 1960 / Italy 1963

Genre: Horror Anthology

Not to be confused with Black Sunday, Black Sabbath is a horror anthology composed of three atmospheric tales. “The Drop of Water” concerns a nurse who steals a ring off a corpse, only
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Definitive Foreign Language Horror Films: 30-21

What is it about foreign horror films that makes them more interesting than so many English language horror films? You would have to think that the language barrier makes it more terrifying; people screaming is already difficult, but speaking a language you don’t understand can only make it worse. So, why are the remakes typically so bad? On this portion of the list, we are treated to a few of the more upsetting films in the canon – one movie I wouldn’t wish for anyone to see, a few that blazed the trail for many more, and one that I would elevate above the horror genre into its own little super-genre.

30. Janghwa, Hongryeon (2003)

English Title: A Tale of Two Sisters

Directed by: Kim Ji-woon

Another excellent Korean horror film America had to remake to lesser results. 2003′s A Tale of Two Sisters is just one of many film adaptations of the folktale,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Jim Mickle interview: Cold In July, thrillers, Argento

  • Den of Geek
We talk to director Jim Mickle about his latest film Cold In July, the secret of suspense and his influences, from the Coens to Argento...

Interview

Where Hollywood appears to have largely abandoned the thriller genre in favour of ever bigger action adventures and sequels, indie filmmakers have stepped in to fill the breach. Earlier this year saw the release of Jeremy Saulnier's quirky low-budget genre piece Blue Ruin - a satisfyingly grisly thriller with a great everyman performance from Macon Blair.

This Friday sees the UK release of Cold In July, the latest film from director Jim Mickle. It stars Dexter's Michael C Hall as Richard, an ordinary family man thrown into a wild and unpredictable criminal underworld after shooting a mysterious intruder in his living room one night.

Adapted from Joe Landsdale's novel of the same name, Cold In July initially slips into the southern neo-noir subgenre,
See full article at Den of Geek »

31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: Top 75

Every year, we here at Sound On Sight celebrate the month of October with 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles. I’ve also decided to publish each post backwards this time for one reason: the new additions appear lower on my list, whereas my top 50 haven’t changed much, except for maybe in ranking. I am including documentaries, short films and mini series, only as special mentions – along with a few features that can qualify as horror, but barely do.

****

Special Mention:

Häxan

Directed by Benjamin Christensen

Denmark / Sweden, 1922

Häxan (a.k.a The Witches or Witchcraft Through The Ages) is a 1922 silent documentary about the history of witchcraft,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

100 + Greatest Horror Movies (pt.3) 100-76

Throughout the month of October, Editor-in-Chief and resident Horror expert Ricky D, will be posting a list of his favorite Horror films of all time. The list will be posted in six parts. Click here to see every entry.

As with all lists, this is personal and nobody will agree with every choice – and if you do, that would be incredibly disturbing. It was almost impossible for me to rank them in order, but I tried and eventually gave up.

****

Special Mention: Gremlins

Directed by Joe Dante

Written by Chris Columbus

1984, USA

Gremlins gets a special mention because I’ve always considered it more of a comedy and a wholesome Christmas flick than an actual horror film. This tribute the 1950s matinee genre stands the test of time from a time when parents would take their children to family films that pushed the boundaries of the MPAA. Joe Dante is
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Greatest Horror Movies Ever Made: Part 6: Best (Italian) Giallo Films

The term “giallo” initially referred to cheap yellow paperbacks (printed American mysteries from writers such as Agatha Christie), that were distributed in post-fascist Italy. Applied to cinema, the genre is comprised of equal parts early pulp thrillers, mystery novels, with a willingness to gleefully explore onscreen sex and violence in provocative, innovative ways. Giallos are strikingly different from American crime films: they value style and plot over characterization, and tend towards unapologetic displays of violence, sexual content, and taboo exploration. The genre is known for stylistic excess, characterized by unnatural yet intriguing lighting techniques, convoluted plots, red herrings, extended murder sequences, excessive bloodletting, stylish camerawork and unusual musical arrangements. Amidst the ‘creative kill’ set-pieces are thematic undercurrents along with a whodunit element, usually some sort of twist ending. Here is my list of the best giallo films – made strictly by Italian directors, so don’t expect Black Swan, Amer or
See full article at SoundOnSight »

What to Buy this Week: DVD and Blu-ray releases for May 2nd

It’s another jam-packed week of DVD and Blu-ray releases, here’s the rundown of what’s available to buy from today, May 2nd 2011.

The Green Hornet (DVD/Blu-ray)

Britt Reid (Seth Rogen) is a slacker by day, party animal by night… until he finds a serious career that’s seriously cool: crime-fighting action hero. As the Green Hornet, he teams up with gadget wiz and martial arts master Kato (Jay Chou) to take down La’s underworld. Even Britt’s assistant Lenore (Cameron Diaz), doesn’t suspect this mismatched pair is the masked duo busting the city’s toughest thugs led by Chudnofsky (Academy Award winner Christoph Waltz, 2010, Supporting Actor, Inglourious Basterds). With style, swagger and an arsenal of awesome gear, the Green Hornet and Kato are doing justice their way, making every mission a mix of over-the-top action and outrageous comedy. Review.

Tekken (DVD)

The year is 2039. World
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Five Essential... Films of Dario Argento

Dominic O'Brien selects his Five Essential Films of Dario Argento

Although he has fallen from grace somewhat recently, during the 70s and 80s Dario Argento was the master of suspense and mystery. During this time he managed to craft some of the finest pieces of Italian giallo and genre films. Still, to this day his films are as genuinely eye popping and disturbingly beautiful as they where when first released. These films are respected by both critics and fans alike, and his influence on future filmmakers is evident even now. As the years passed his genre films quickly became more rock n’ roll, particularly with his frequent collaborator - composer Claudio Simonetti - though he never managed to maintain the highs he had all those years previously. With that in mind, I present the essential Dario Argento...

5. Inferno (1980)

An often over looked film, Argento once again strays into the supernatural
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

[Update] Video Home Invasion Arrow Films Argento Giveaway!!

[Rodney reminded me that I should give you guys a heads up that the Argento giveaway ends tonight!  Get your entries in, this is a great prize!  Also, look out for another Arrow Video prize pack tonight!]

In addition to being one of the coolest home video labels out there, Arrow Video are also totally generous!  In the introduction to my Arrow Video column last week, I hinted that Arrow Video promised me some giveaways.  Well, they have delivered better than I had even imagined!  In the next week or so I will be giving away one copy of every single title in the Arrow Video collection!  That is a ton!  I thought that to get it started, we should drop a big package on one lucky reader!

For today's giveaway, one reader will get a prize pack with one copy each of Arrow Video's DVDs of Sleepless, Terror at the Opera, Two Evil Eyes, The Stendhal Syndrome, and The Card Player; in addition that reader will get a copy of their brand new Blu-ray edition of Inferno!  That's a whole stack of Argento!  Anyone is eligible,
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Video Home Invasion: Arrow Video and Argento

One of Arrow Video's great success stories is the championing of Dario Argento's work on home video in the UK.  I know what some of you may be thinking, and perhaps championing Argento isn't exactly controversial position to defend, but no one had really taken up the challenge of rescuing many of these Argento features in Britain from BBFC cut purgatory.  Many of Argento's features have been sliced and diced by the BBFC, and for the most part, home video distributors have made do with the cuts in order to have a marketable product.  Arrow Video, however has taken some of these very same films, including their recent Blu-ray/DVD release of Inferno, back to the BBFC for reclassification, and they won!  They are currently awaiting a decision on Deep Red (Profondo Rosso), which has yet to be seen completely uncut in most areas of the world.  This is
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Italy's Hidden 3D Goes Through Cast and Crew Changes

  • Dread Central
It's always good to know that America isn't the only country that sometimes has trouble getting its shit together. Italy's first ever 3D feature film, Hidden 3D, has undergone a bit of a shake-up cast and crew wise, and we're here to keep you up to date as always.

According to Bloody Disgusting:

"Antoine Thomas stepped into the director's chair, replacing Mariano Baino (who wrote the screenplay, yet for some reason isn't being credited). Sean Clement ("Fringe"), Simonetta Solder, Jordan Hayes (House at the End of the Street), Jason Blicker, Bjanka Murgel have all been cast in the film now in post-production. The English-language horror/thriller is about an abandoned experimental medical center that harbors a deadly secret. It only becomes known when a restoration project begins. Coralina Cataldi-Tassoni (pictured below), who you might remember from Demons 2, Terror at the Opera and Dario Argento's The Phantom of the Opera,
See full article at Dread Central »

Bizarre Changes to 'Hidden 3D' Cast and Crew

A bunch of odd updates regarding E1 Entertainment's Hidden 3D, the first Italian-made 3D feature. We've now learned that Antoine Thomas stepped into the director's chair, replacing Mariano Baino (who wrote the screenplay, yet for some reason isn't being credited). Sean Clement, Simonetta Solder, Jordan Hayes, Jason Blicker, Bjanka Murgel have all been cast in the film now in post-production. The English-language horror/thriller is about an abandoned experimental medical center that harbors a deadly secret. It only becomes known when a restoration project begins. Coralina Cataldi-Tassoni, who you might remember from Demons 2, Terror at the Opera and Dario Argento's The Phantom of the Opera, is no longer listed on IMDb as writer or star. I seriously want to know what the heck happened.
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

It's Argento Overload for UK Readers! Win a DVD Triple-Pack!

To celebrate the release of their latest batch of Dario Argento DVDs, Arrow Video and The Associates are teaming up with Dread Central to give two lucky UK readers a triple-threat pack including The Card Player, The Stendhal Syndrome, and Terror at the Opera!

The Card Player (review here)

“A serial killer is on the loose in Rome, kidnapping women and using them as the stake in a series of deadly games of poker played with the police over the internet. If the police win, the victim is set free; if they lose, the victim dies and the police are rewarded with a gruesome video of the murder being committed. When a British tourist becomes involved, disgraced Irish cop John Brennan (Liam Cunningham) is sent to Rome to investigate. There, he teams up with Anna Mari (Stefania Rocca), the no-nonsense Italian detective heading up the investigation. Once they set about tracking down the killer,
See full article at Dread Central »

Win 3 Argento films on DVD: 'The Stendhal Syndrome', 'The Card Player', 'Terror at the Opera'

  • Planet Fury
Win a set of 3 awesome horror films freshly on DVD by Dario Argento, simply because you're on this site and we like you. Today, The Card Player, The Stendhal Syndrome, and Terror at the Opera are available on DVD and we've got a set that you can win simply by answering the following question in the form of a comment below. Winner will be chosen based on awesomeness of answer:

Is Asia Argento awesome or sucky?...

See Italian horror maestro Dario Argento moving into classic detective thriller territory in what is generally considered to be his most commercially accessible work to date. The Card Player is an innovative, modern day thriller highlighted by a dazzling set-piece set around a breathtaking ‘cat and mouse’ chase between Anna and the film's eponymous killer.

Considered by many to be a remarkable return to vintage form for the Italian master of suspense and terror,
See full article at Planet Fury »

Italy Goes 3D with Hidden

Looks as if the 3D craze is official in Italy. First we brought you the news about Italy's Turn of the Screw 3D (story here), and now word of Hidden 3D has come to light. Interestingly enough, they're both claiming to be the country's first three-dimensional film.

According to Screen Daily production is due to start soon on Hidden, an Italy-Canada co-production that will be filmed in English.

"The horror/thriller is about an abandoned experimental medical centre that harbours a deadly secret. It only becomes known when a restoration project begins."

Bloody Disgusting nailed down some casting news back in November, stating that Coralina Cataldi-Tassoni (pictured below; Demons 2, Terror at the Opera, Dario Argento's The Phantom of the Opera) will be writing and starring in the film for director Mariano Baino. She will play the role of Haley.

- Uncle Creepy

Check Out Dread Central’S New Poster Store!
See full article at Dread Central »

First Italian-made 3D feature 'Hidden' Shoots This Month

First revealed exclusively here on Bd back in November, production is due to officially start on Hidden 3D, the first Italian-made 3D feature, with principal photography getting underway in Canada later this month. The English-language horror/thriller is about an abandoned experimental medical center that harbors a deadly secret. It only becomes known when a restoration project begins. While this has yet to be reported, we're told Coralina Cataldi-Tassoni, who you might remember from Demons 2, Terror at the Opera and Dario Argento's The Phantom of the Opera, has been co-writing a new horror film with Mariano Baino (Dark Waters). Baino will also be getting behind the camera for Hidden 3D, which was developed as starring vehicle for Cataldi-Tassoni. She will play the role of Haley.
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Duritz Is An Opera Fan

  • WENN
Counting Crows singer Adam Duritz is reinventing himself as rock's renaissance man - after discovering the link between opera and pop.

The star claims all music is interlinked, and insists fans should embrace every genre out there.

He says, "Music is music. I'm 43, but I love Louis Armstrong and Miles Davis. There is no real reason why anyone shouldn't love all of it.

"I never understood opera in my life. That bugged me, so I went to the opera and bought opera records, and now I get it. Pop music comes from Puccini."

See also

Showtimes | External Sites