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1-20 of 166 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Bring The Nice Guys Home Next Month on Blu-Ray

21 July 2016 1:16 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Warner Bros. is bringing the world's worst detectives, Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling, into your household, as they've revealed details on The Nice Guys blu-ray which is set to launch in August.  Come inside to check out all the details.  

If you missed out on the hilarious 'buddy cop' style film when it hit theaters earlier this year, or simply want to see it again, you'll be able to watch The Nice Guys on blu-ray starting August 23rd.  If you can't wait that long, the digital version will launch on August 9th.  

This case might raise a few eyebrows when “The Nice Guys” arrives onto Blu-ray Combo Pack, DVD and Digital HD. Oscar® winner Russell Crowe (“Gladiator,” “A Beautiful Mind”) and Oscar nominee Ryan Gosling (“Half Nelson,” “The Big Short”) star in Silver Pictures’ action comedy “The Nice Guys,” from writer/director Shane Black (“Iron Man 3,” “Kiss Kiss, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Jordan Maison)

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Lethal Weapon Actor Gary Busey Is Hitman’s Next Elusive Target

18 July 2016 9:17 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

No, it’s not a joke. Starting July 21, Gary Busey, Hollywood actor and star of films like Lethal Weapon and Point Break, will be immortalized in the world of Hitman, not as a friendly Npc, but an Elusive Target that the player must track down and kill.

At this point, you’re probably asking yourselves, ‘why Gary Busey?’ The answer is quite simple: he was included as part of a ‘Choose Your Hit’ campaign held by Io Interactive that asked players to choose between Busey or Gary Cole to be an in-game target.

Following the successful online campaign to ‘Choose Your Hit’, where fans voted who would appear in Hitman as a special target between two Hollywood big-hitters Gary Cole and Gary Busey.

Gary Busey won and will appear in Hitman as an Elusive Target for 7 days.

Hitman‘s seventh contract, dubbed ‘The Wildcard’ goes live at 14:00 Cest / 05:00 Pdt later this week, »

- Joe Pring

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Charlie Kaufman Reflects On His Career: ‘I Feel Like I F*cking Blew It’

12 July 2016 9:26 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“I feel like I fucking blew it.”

Charlie Kaufman was talking about his career. More specifically, he was addressing his supposed failure to capitalize on the momentum generated by his scripts for “Being John Malkovich,” “Adaptation” and “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.” Once upon a time, Kaufman’s name was spoken at Hollywood lunches with the same breathless excitement and opportunistic fervor that studio executives tend to reserve for young starlets  — back then, he commanded more attention (if not more money) than any other screenwriter since “Lethal Weapon” scribe Shane Black. His potential in the industry seemed positively zoo-sized.

These days, so far as Kaufman is concerned, that’s no longer the case.

“I don’t feel like I’ve got that cachet that I had at a certain point,” he said, looking hard at the table between us. “I see people seizing the moment when they have the »

- David Ehrlich

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First It Set Photos Bring Stephen King's Derry, Maine to Life

11 July 2016 10:23 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Late last month, we reported that production had finally began on New Line Cinema's adaptation of Stephen King's beloved novel It, which will be split into a two-part movie. The first movie will follow a group of kids known as the Losers Club, who band togethr to fight off a an evil clown known as Pennywise. The second movie brings back the same characters as adults, as It emerges once again and the Losers Club must defeat him once and for all. With production continuing this week, we have new photos that show how a town in Ontario, Canada is being transformed into Derry, Maine from the iconic novel.

Northumberland News reveals that production is set to start in Port Hope, Ontario Canada today, with filming slated to last in the town until Monday, July 18. Naturally, the town underwent a number of cosmetic changes to transform itself into Derry, »

- MovieWeb

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‘Blood Father’ New Trailer & Poster: Mel Gibson Will Do Anything To Save His Estranged Daughter

7 July 2016 12:20 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Blood Father” follows John Link (Mel Gibson), an ex-convict and recovering alcoholic who runs a tattoo parlor out of his dusty trailer on the outskirts of Los Angeles. When his estranged daughter (Erin Moriarty) shows up out of the blue on the lam after a drug deal gone bad, Link is forced to protect her when a roving drug cartel comes after her with everything they’ve got. The film also features William H. Macy (“Fargo”), Elisabeth Röhm (“Angel”), Diego Luna (“Y tu mamá también”), Thomas Mann (“Me and Earl and the Dying Girl”), Dale Dickey (“Winter;s Bone”), and more. Watch the new trailer for the film below and check out a new poster as well.

Read More: Cannes Review: Mel Gibson is Officially a B-Movie Star With ‘Blood Father

Mel Gibson is best known for his roles as renegade cop Martin Riggs in the “Lethal Weapon” franchise and »

- Vikram Murthi

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The ‘Lethal Weapon’ TV show will air on ITV in the UK

5 July 2016 7:06 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The upcoming Lethal Weapon TV show will air on ITV in the UK in a prime time spot. The show, produced by Warner Brothers Television in the Us, airing on Fox, will hit the terrestrial channel in the near future.

ITV said the show marked “the return of acquired content to the primetime schedule” of the channel.

ITV’s Kevin Lygo told the BBC: “It’s rare that we find an acquisition with that sweet spot potential – the best production values and hugely entertaining drama, that we think can appeal to the biggest and broadest audiences and take up a place in ITV primetime”.

Sasha Breslau, who bought the show for ITV, said it was a “superb” reboot, “with the perfect mix of action, heart, humour and terrific chemistry” between Wayans and Crawford.

“I’m thrilled and excited to see the show take its place alongside ITV’s popular homegrown dramas, »

- Paul Heath

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ITV Loads Up 'Lethal Weapon' Series

4 July 2016 3:03 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The U.K. may have considerably tighter gun laws than the U.S., but that hasn't stopped ITV from picking up the upcoming Lethal Weapon TV series. Due to air stateside on Fox starting in September, the show is based on the movie franchise and stars Clayne Crawford and Damon Wayans in the roles made famous by Mel Gibson and Danny Glover. Lethal Weapon was picked up from Warner Bros. International Television Distribution in a move ITV said marked the return of acquired content to its primetime schedule. The deal was brokered by Sasha Breslau, the U.K. network's head

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- Alex Ritman

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Lethal Weapon Star Talks Reviving Martin Riggs: 'He's a Badass'

22 June 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Move over Mel Gibson, there’s a new Riggs in town.

Fox’s upcoming Lethal Weapon series, based on the ’80s movie franchise of the same name, stars Clayne Crawford (Rectify) as Martin Riggs and Damon Wayans (My Wife and Kids) as Roger Murtaugh. The drama, which follows an unconventional cop with a death wish (Riggs) after he is partnered with a high-strung, traditional detective and family man (Murtaugh), is set to premiere Wednesday, Sept. 21, at 8/7c.

RelatedFall TV First Impression: Lethal Weapon

Crawford recently talked to TVLine about what fans can expect from the new show (and what The »

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Here's What You're Watching on Netflix This Month

21 June 2016 12:48 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

We're living a tidal wave of content. It's hard to know what to watch, when, and where. We're here to help! By telling you that you can and should watch a movie about a tsunami entitled The Wave from the director of the upcoming Tomb Raider movie, Roar Uthaug, on Netflix next month. The streaming service has released the titles for their July 2016 movies and TV shows, though they are subject to change. Also available are those titles leaving Netflix in July. Highlights of what you can look forward to include: Back to the Future 1- 3, Beverly Hills Cop 1 and 2  (if you want to get ready for the upcoming sequel), All of the Lethal Weapon movies (get a look at The Predator director Shane Black's first script brought to life), BoJack Horseman Season 3, The Sting, and more. Make sure to check out these titles before they leave: A Clockwork Orange, »

- Roth Cornet

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Mel Gibson on chasing Hugo Weaving for Hacksaw Ridge and shooting in Oz

19 June 2016 9:25 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Mel Gibson.

In conversation last week at the Sydney Film Festival, Mel Gibson spoke at length with Fairfax's Garry Maddox about his upcoming directorial effort Hacksaw Ridge.

Shot in Sydney late last year, Gibson called his fifth directorial outing a "100 percent Aussie film.".

"The crew and most of the cast [were Aussie], it was part-financed here and shot here. Portaying a story that takes place in Lynchburg, Virginia and Okinawa, and they totally pulled it off."

Gibson has just returned from test screenings in Lynchburg (the home town of the film's main character, Desmond Doss) and said the locals "wondered how we got in and shot there without them knowing."

The story of Virginia farmboy Doss (played by Andrew Garfield) landed on Gibson's desk after a long development process, and appealed to the Oscar winner for Braveheart because of Doss's "singular" nature.

"He was the first conscientious objector to be given the Medal of Honor. »

- Harry Windsor

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Dp Philippe Rousselot on The Nice Guys, Learning from Néstor Almendros and Loving China Balls

15 June 2016 12:50 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Shane Black was just 24 years old when he sold the spec script that would become Lethal Weapon. Since then Black’s name in the credits – whether as writer or director – brings a certain set of expectations: tarnished, mismatched heroes (likely of the cop and/or private detective variety); a plot overflowing with set-ups and pay-offs, reversals, and sly humor; the subversion of genre tropes; and at least an 85 percent chance of a Christmas setting. Most of that checklist gets ticked off in Black’s latest The Nice Guys, a detective yarn in which a private investigator (Ryan Gosling) and […] »

- Matt Mulcahey

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Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997

13 June 2016 2:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script. 

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue

Yeah.

Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

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Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue »

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Predator 4 Begins Shooting This September in Vancouver

12 June 2016 11:56 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Director Shane Black's upcoming sequel Predator 4 will be titled Predator. It begins shooting this September in Vancouver. And the massive production will last through December. This news comes courtesy of the Director's Guild of Canada. At this time, no cast has been officially announced. Arnold Schwarzenegger has been rumored to return as Dutch from the 1987 original, and rapper 50 Cent has said he's part of the team, but that has never been confirmed by 20th Century Fox.

The DGA has The Predator listed to start shooting on September 26. At this time, it isn't known if the entirety of the movie will be done in Vancouver, or if there are location shoots planned after December. It also isn't known how much of the movie will be shot in studio as opposed to out in the jungle. In fact, a setting hasn't been disclosed, with the previous reboot Predators taking place in the forest. It's not clear if this next entry in the saga will follow suit.

The Predator was supposed to arrive in March 2018, but last month 20th Century Fox moved the sequel into February. The story is confirmed to take place in modern day, and will not revisit the 80s as some have speculated. While it has been acknowledged that Arnold Schwarzenegger has taken meetings for The Predator, Shane Black refuses to further comment on his involvement. But it is believed that we'll get reintroduced to Dutch thirty years after he first tangled with the alien killing machine who hunts humans for sport. Dutch will not be the main hero, though, as Black has revealed the lead character is named Quinn MacKenna.

As of now, Schwarzenegger is listed as 'still in talks', though he has not officially committed to the movie in any capacity. It isn't known if the hesitation to return stems from his involvement in Terminator Genisys, which was a box office flop. There were 2 more Terminator reboot sequels planned with Arnie in the lead, but they were put on indefinite hold. The action icon is currently gearing up to shoot two other long-awaited sequels to some of his best known movies, including the follow-up to Twins titled Triplets, which reunites him with Danny DeVito and brings in Eddie Murphy as a third sibling. And The Legend of Conan.

Though Shane Black is also signed to direct Dwayne Johnson in a reboot adaptation of Doc Savage, the Iron Man 3 director has confirmed that The Predator is his next project. The filmmaker has a unique history with the Predator franchise. While working as a screenwriter in the 80s, behind such hits as the Lethal Weapon franchise, he was asked to help with the Predator script. While he turned that side of the production down, he did decided to take on a role as a member of Dutch's team, playing the character known as Hawkins.

The Predator will arrive in theaters on February 9, 2018. Shane Black's latest movie The Nice Guys is currently playing in theaters across the country. Thus far, an official Predator teaser poster has been released by 20th Century Fox. We suspect that we'll be getting official casting information soon as the shoot is just around the corner. »

- MovieWeb

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Movie Review – Gridlocked (2016)

9 June 2016 12:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Gridlocked, 2016.

Directed by Allan Ungar.

Starring Dominic Purcell, Cody Hackman, Stephen Lang, Vinnie Jones, Trish Stratus, Danny Glover, Saul Rubinek and Richard Gunn.

Synopsis:

Former Swat leader David Hendrix and hard-partying movie star Brody Walker must cut their ride-along short when a police training facility is attacked by a team of mercenaries.

 

They say not to judge a book by its cover, and that’s a good piece of advice. But here’s another one: learn to look for the red flags. When staring down a movie like Gridlocked on your Netflix queue, your local Redbox, or wherever else you may come across it, it’s an important skill to be able to read the signs that identify this as something not to be given a second look. Is the cover a generic, unremarkable photoshop job? Is the cast populated by c-action regulars, with perhaps one once-recognizable industry veteran thrown »

- Thomas O'Connor

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The Nice Guys review – sleaze and slapstick in 70s La

5 June 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe do chalk and cheese in Lethal Weapon writer Shane Black’s old-school buddy pic

Ryan Gosling’s private investigator makes most of his discoveries by falling off, over and into things

In the late 80s, Shane Black’s Lethal Weapon script became a touchstone for saleable, hard-boiled, odd-couple buddy pics, movies that combined action, comedy and wise-assed verbal vulgarity in varying measures. 1991’s The Last Boy Scout built on Black’s fondness for smart, nihilistic profanity, predating the arrival of Reservoir Dogs, after which anything involving swearing, guns and cine-literacy would be lazily labelled “Tarantino-esque”. In 1996, Black made headlines by earning a record-breaking $4m for penning the script for what became the Geena Davis/Samuel Jackson thriller The Long Kiss Goodnight. But it wasn’t until 2005 that the writer finally turned director with Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, a tongue-in-cheek La neo-noir, the mistyped tagline for which ran: “SeX. »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Shane Black and the 90s spec script gold rush

1 June 2016 9:53 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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A rush for original scripts led to Shane Black being among the highest-paid screenwriters in Hollywood. Ryan takes a look back...

Shane Black, 28 years old, poses for a photograph outside his Los Angeles bungalow. It’s 1990, and Black’s name has appeared all over the Hollywood trade press thanks to his latest script sale - or, more specifically, how much Warner Bros had spent on purchasing it. The script was for The Last Boy Scout, an action thriller that would eventually appear in cinemas in 1991 starring Bruce Willis. Black sold it for $1.75m - said to be the highest price ever paid for a screenplay at that time.

So here’s Shane Black, standing barefoot on the concrete paving slabs outside his house, which he and his roommates had dubbed the Pad O’Guys. Black’s wearing ripped jeans and a threadbare-looking lumberjack shirt; to his right »

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The Nice Guys Review

1 June 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

A pioneer of the action genre – having penned the screenplays for seminal endeavours ranging from Lethal Weapon, The Last Boy Scout, and The Long Kiss GoodnightShane Black is something of an elusive presence in the director’s chair, with just two credits to his name in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and Iron Man […]

The post The Nice Guys Review appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Stefan Pape

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The 19 upcoming movies of Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson

31 May 2016 5:44 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Can you smell what The Rock is cooking? If so, you must be sniffing the sweet scent of 17 upcoming movies...

Got a movie you’re trying to make? Why not put Dwayne Johnson in it? It’s what everyone else seems to be doing, and it’s bound to earn you a fervent flurry of publicity. The man who it may not be acceptable to call ‘The Rock’ anymore has a whopping 17 films on his slate at the moment, though, so he may struggle to fit you in. But is there a movie star who's working harder right now?

The Rock's Kevin Hart comedy team-up Central Intelligence is in cinemas now, and after that Mr Johnson will be bringing us this massive pile of movies... 

The Definites Baywatch

Currently in post-production, the cinematic Baywatch revival is another example of The Rock being injected in to bring new »

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Dwayne Johnson Makes Doc Savage Movie Official

30 May 2016 11:10 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

It is quite possible that Dwayne Johnson just became the hardest working actor in Hollywood. Having dropped some fairly specific hints in recent weeks, the star has now officially confirmed that he will headline a Doc Savage movie for filmmaker Shane Black and Sony Pictures, and Johnson could not be more excited for the project to begin.

While the actor is about to hit theatres with Kevin Hart in the upcoming comedy Central Intelligence, he also has Baywatch, Fast 8, a sequel to San Andreas and a reboot of Jumanji on his slate – not to mention the ongoing speculation about a possible role in the long-rumoured Shazam! film for DC and Warner Bros. It is Shane Black that has drawn a new commitment from the actor, though, as he prepares to turn Dwayne Johnson into a truly classic superhero.

Black himself is due to commence production on a Predator reboot for 20th Century Fox, »

- Sarah Myles

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Mel Gibson Says He Was Offered The Role Of 'Odin' In The First Thor; Comments On Formulaic Superhero Movies

26 May 2016 10:39 PM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

If the rumor is to be believed, Robert Downey Jr. has been courting Mel Gibson (Lethal Weapon, Braveheart, drunken racist rants) to helm the fourth Iron Man movie - but as it turns out, the Aussie actor/director almost joined the McU family 5 years ago. In an interview with The Guardian, Gibson was asked if he'd ever had the opportunity to star in a superhero movie, and replied: "Yeah, long time ago, to play Thor’s dad. But I didn’t do it.”  Of course the role ultimately went to Anthony Hopkins, who will return as Odin in Thor: Ragnarok - but is there a chance Gibson would decide to play a different comic book character at some point in the future? Anything is possible, but from the sounds of things it wouldn't be the actor's favourite genre... a few notable exceptions aside. "Some are good. Some are kind of funny … ‘Guardians of the Galaxy. »

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