6.7/10
19,659
98 user 25 critic

Hamburger Hill (1987)

A very realistic interpretation of one of the bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War.

Director:

Writer:

(as Jim Carabatsos)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anthony Barrile ...
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Pvt. Ray Motown (as Michael Patrick Boatman)
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Michael Dolan ...
Don James ...
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Pvt. Paul Galvan (as M.A. Nickles)
Harry O'Reilly ...
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Tommy Swerdlow ...
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Storyline

A brutal and realistic war film focuses on the lives of a squad of 14 U.S. Army soldiers of B Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infanty Regiment, 101st Airborne Division during the brutal 10 day (May 11-20, 1969) battle for Hill 937 in the A Shau Valley of Vietnam as they try again and again to take the fortified hill held by the North Vietnamese, and the faults and casualties they take every time in which the battle was later dubbed "Hamburger Hill" because enemy fire was so fierce that the fusillade of bullets turned assaulting troops into shreded hamburger meat. Written by Matthew Patay <1792a@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The most realistic portrayal of the Vietnam War ever filmed . Because it's the only one that's true. See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | Thriller | War

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

28 August 1987 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

937: Posición de combate  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Gross:

$13,839,404 (USA)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Rankcolor)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Screenwriter James Carabatsos had fought in the Vietnam war. One reason that producer Marcia Nasatir came on board is because her son had also fought in Vietnam. See more »

Goofs

A gravity bomb or napalm tank is moving at the speed of the plane when released, and only picks up downward velocity at 32.2 ft/sec per second. So it drops 16 ft the first sec, 48 ft the second sec, another 80 ft the 3rd. It's moving forward about 300 mph or 440 ft/sec, roughly the field of vision or six lengths of an F-4 in a second. So the F-4s dropped their loads about a second or over 400 feet before you even see them. The film has it right. See more »

Quotes

Sgt. Frantz: Han is closing in on your position. It's night... Look at me! I'm gonna save your life and your gonna save mine. It's night, it's raining. While your thinking about peace, love and whether or not we should be in Vietnam, Han is going to cut your fucking throat. And your sleeping. You've been humping the boonies for months. It's your turn to sleep, you're allowed to sleep. What do you think Han is going to do? Is he going to wake you up, Alphabet? And smile? And talk about women? Mister ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The following poem is shown at the beginning of the credits: If you are able, save for them a place inside of you and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go. Be not ashamed to say you loved them, though you may or may not have always. Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own. And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind. Major Michael Davis O'Donnell 1 January 1970 Dak To, Vietnam See more »

Connections

References Tarzan the Ape Man (1932) See more »

Soundtracks

I Feel Like I'm Fixin' to Die Rag
Written by Country Joe McDonald
Performed by Country Joe and the Fish
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Realism and Radicalism
23 April 2001 | by (Sacramento, CA) – See all my reviews

This is an excellent depiction of the insanity that was the war in Viet Nam. My view as a naval officer during a scenic tour of the Mekong near the Cambodian border and the Vietnamese city of Chau Phu, permitted me to be a witness to many, many occasions involving the wholesale abuse of humans by humans. The strain on mind, body and soul takes years (if ever) to repair and this film captures it. There are brief glimpses of this agony in some of the other films mentioned here in the reviews, e.g., Apocalypse Now, Full Metal Jacket and Platoon. Each of these films have merit but are deeply flawed. Apocalypse Now is steeped in moral allegory to the expense of an accurate portrayal of the war; Full Metal Jacket is only 2/3 completed; Platoon becomes a Levi-Straussian moral tale with an arch villain and virtuous hero-- the latter heinously slain by the former with revenge exacted by the weary sojourner on the odyssey. OK. What do we have here with Hamburger Hill? A story? Heroic acts? Action? Not really. What we have is the horror and insanity of war. The film ends on the same pointless note as it began. But, you know what? Reading through the detractors of this film who touted the other potential three and slammed this one, I would not hesitate to bet they were never there. I could glance at the reviews and pick out the vets-- not just on the basis of whether they liked this film or not but of how they reacted to it. I know and know damn well. I too was there, brothers. See this film. It's well produced, directed and the cast is damn good. Check it out.


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