6.7/10
19,886
99 user 25 critic

Hamburger Hill (1987)

A very realistic interpretation of one of the bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War.

Director:

Writer:

(as Jim Carabatsos)
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On Disc

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anthony Barrile ...
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Pvt. Ray Motown (as Michael Patrick Boatman)
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Michael Dolan ...
Don James ...
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Pvt. Paul Galvan (as M.A. Nickles)
Harry O'Reilly ...
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Tommy Swerdlow ...
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Storyline

A brutal and realistic war film focuses on the lives of a squad of 14 U.S. Army soldiers of B Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infanty Regiment, 101st Airborne Division during the brutal 10 day (May 11-20, 1969) battle for Hill 937 in the A Shau Valley of Vietnam as they try again and again to take the fortified hill held by the North Vietnamese, and the faults and casualties they take every time in which the battle was later dubbed "Hamburger Hill" because enemy fire was so fierce that the fusillade of bullets turned assaulting troops into shreded hamburger meat. Written by Matthew Patay <1792a@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

War at its worst. Men at their Best. See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | Thriller | War

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

28 August 1987 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

937: Posición de combate  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Gross:

$13,839,404 (USA)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Rankcolor)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The closing credits include a famous poem about the war written by Major Michael Davis O'Donnell on January 1, 1970. O'Donnell was declared missing in action on March 24, 1970 after piloting a helicopter on an extraction mission inside Cambodia. He was declared killed in action in 1978. His remains were recovered and identified with DNA testing many years later, and were interred at Arlington National Cemetery in 2001. See more »

Goofs

In the U.S. Army in Vietnam in 1969 the correct radio jargon for artillery fire missions was "Shot, over." from the artillery battery with the reply "Shot, out." from the infantry on the ground. Then came "Splash, over." and "Splash, out." Perhaps the "Rounds over" and "Rounds out." jargon was used by the U.S. Marine Corps. See more »

Quotes

Doc: We've been up on that hill ten times, and they still don't think we're serious.
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Crazy Credits

The following poem is shown at the beginning of the credits: If you are able, save for them a place inside of you and save one backward glance when you are leaving for the places they can no longer go. Be not ashamed to say you loved them, though you may or may not have always. Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own. And in that time when men decide and feel safe to call the war insane, take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind. Major Michael Davis O'Donnell 1 January 1970 Dak To, Vietnam See more »

Connections

Referenced in Riot on 42nd St. (1987) See more »

Soundtracks

When A Man Loves A Woman
Written by Calvin Lewis and Andrew Wright
Performed by Percy Sledge
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

A rare "Real" one.
8 August 2004 | by (Mississippi River Bottoms Southern Illinois) – See all my reviews

No stars, no over the top heroics, no secret missions. Brutally realistic and historical accurate Nam film. One of the very few so far. One can nit-pick over the dialogue interludes throughout the film, but as with any story there has to be a set backdrop for characters to develop from. You have to know a little about these guys before you can really feel for them. It's a plot device but it works and takes nothing away from the film. Well done war films are a rarity, especially Vietnam era ones. This particular film is truly a good one. I would even consider it an excellent film for history students of the war and it's times. The last scene screams out in silence what every combat vet knows and feels.


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