Edit
The Fourth Protocol (1987) Poster

Trivia

Sir Michael Caine once said of this film in his autobiography "What's It All About?" (1992): "We wound up with a wordy action movie which, although it was quite a good picture, and did fair business, never had the speed and pace of the best American action movies. So for long sequences in the film, we not only had a talking picture, but a lot of talk, and even worse, most of it unintelligible. I went there as the star and Associate Producer, and one might have thought this would give me sufficient authority to put my own strongly-held opinions into practice, but no chance. Even I, in my exalted position, wound up making a talking picture, when it should have been a moving one."
Jump to: Cameo (1)
The Fourth Protocol is a fictional secret protocol of the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, containing an agreement between nuclear powers that nuclear weapons will only be delivered to their target by conventional means, e.g. dropped from aircraft or on missiles. In the world of the film, it effectively prevents them being left in luggage lockers or delivered by postal companies (or specifically in the case of this film, being assembled and left in a house close to the target).
The radio presenter, reading the news broadcast that Valeri Petrofsky (Pierce Brosnan) is listening to for information, is Frederick Forsyth.
Sir Michael Caine and author Frederick Forsyth had been friends for around a decade prior to this picture. In the three earlier filmed adaptations of Forsyth novels, Caine was never selected to be in them. So the two decided raise the financing themselves, so as to make sure they could work on a movie together. The two are billed as Executive Producers on this movie.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
"The Fourth Protocol" was the fifth novel and seventh book written by Frederick Forsyth.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The movie featured Matryoshka dolls, a.k.a. Russian nesting dolls, or Russian nested dolls. These had become popularized, and well-known from appearing in the opening title sequence of the earlier television production of John Le Carré's Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1979).
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
One of two espionage movies that starred Sir Michael Caine in 1987. The other film was The Whistle Blower (1986).
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This film is the fourth theatrical movie adapted from a novel by Frederick Forsyth. The first three were The Day of the Jackal (1973), The Odessa File (1974), and The Dogs of War (1980).
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The title is a reference to the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. The meaning and relevance is as defined on the Australian video cassette sleeve: "The Fourth Protocol is a secret agreement between the Soviet powers and the Western allies forbidding the importation of component parts of a nuclear bomb into the territory of any nation." As such, one of the movie's taglines declares, "If the Fourth Protocol is ever breached, there would be no warning, just a nuclear explosion from a bedsitter."
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The spy film that Pierce Brosnan made before becoming James Bond in GoldenEye (1995). Ironically, it was the same year that The Living Daylights (1987) was released. That was the Bond film, for which Brosnan was originally cast, but in the end, could not do, due to his contract being picked up for further episodes of Remington Steele (1982).
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Final theatrical film of actor John Horsley.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The K.G.B. training facility, seen at the beginning of the movie, was a group of converted school buildings.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The two lead roles in this spy movie are played by actors who have played famous spies: Sir Michael Caine (Harry Palmer) and Pierce Brosnan (James Bond).
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Cinematographer Phil Meheux and Director John Mackenzie have also collaborated on Ruby (1992), Beyond the Limit (1983), and The Long Good Friday (1980). Meheux lensed GoldenEye (1995) and Casino Royale (2006).
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film starred Sir Michael Caine and featured Michael Gough. Both have played Bruce Wayner's butler Alfred Pennyworth in the Batman and Dark Knight movies. This was the only film in which they both appeared.
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
A video game of "The Fourth Protocol" was developed and released in 1985. As such, the video game has the distinction of being made before, and not at the same time, or after, the movie. The computer game was made for the Commodore 64 and ZX Spectrum home computer platforms.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's opening prologue states: "1963 - top British Agent Kim Philby defected to Moscow. 1968 - America, Britain, Russia signed an agreement to halt the spread of nuclear weapons. This treaty continued four secret protocols. Today - only one remains."
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Debut film as an Executive Producer for author Frederick Forsyth.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Doubling for the Soviet Union (Russia), was the country of Finland. The production shoot there ran for just one week.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This movie was released three years after its source novel was published.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Second of three movies that Sir Michael Caine made with John Mackenzie. The others being Beyond the Limit (1983), and Quicksand (2003). Pierce Brosnan worked with John Mackenzie on The Long Good Friday (1980).
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Despite their mutual top billing, Pierce Brosnan and Sir Michael Caine share very little screentime together.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The reversed code number of James Bond can be read in the license plate of Pierce Brosnan's motorcycle: C700 OBL.
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The production of the movie had a Royal Visit. Prince Michael of Kent visited the set during principal photography.
3 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When Michael Caine's character breaks into an apartment early in the film, the music playing in the party is Susie Blue, by Alaska, the mid-1980s band of ex-Whitesnake guitarist, Bernie Marsden.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Cameo 

Frederick Forsyth: Uncredited, the film's source novelist as the voice of a radio newsreader.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page