The Fourth Protocol
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2016 | 2015 | 2013 | 2011

4 items from 2011


Hot Rods & Droids: A George Lucas Profile (Part 4)

5 July 2011 11:50 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary filmmaker George Lucas in the fourth of a six part feature... read parts one, two and three.

For over a decade filmmaker George Lucas had been developing a project which was a gender reversal of the Biblical story about Moses being hidden as a baby in the bulrushes. When asked to describe Willow (1988), Lucas called it “an adventure fantasy that takes place a long time ago in a mythical land.” Cast as the title character who becomes the guardian and defender of the wayward baby from an evil sorceress was Warwick Davis who made a name for himself playing the Ewok known as Wicket. “I was on holiday in southwest England when I got a call from George to come to Elstree – one of the major British studios – and audition for the part,” remembers Davis. “Actually, I did four auditions altogether; three in England and one in America. »

- flickeringmyth

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John Mackenzie obituary

12 June 2011 4:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Film director whose career took him from gritty television plays to Hollywood thrillers

People who talk wistfully of the "golden age of British television drama" are often accused of viewing the past through the rosy lens of nostalgia. But a clear-eyed examination of the era proves that such slots as the BBC's The Wednesday Play (1964-70) and Play for Today (1970-84) were unsurpassed as breeding grounds for talented directors such as John Mackenzie, who has died after a stroke aged 83. Like most of his contemporaries who gained their experience by working in television – Philip Saville, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Ken Loach, Mike Newell, Michael Apted and Mike Leigh – Mackenzie went on to make feature films, notably his superb London-based gangster picture, The Long Good Friday (1980).

The television background trained Mackenzie to work quickly on taut and realistic narratives, within a tight budget and on schedule. One of his first jobs was as »

- Ronald Bergan

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John Mackenzie obituary

12 June 2011 4:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Film director whose career took him from gritty television plays to Hollywood thrillers

People who talk wistfully of the "golden age of British television drama" are often accused of viewing the past through the rosy lens of nostalgia. But a clear-eyed examination of the era proves that such slots as the BBC's The Wednesday Play (1964-70) and Play for Today (1970-84) were unsurpassed as breeding grounds for talented directors such as John Mackenzie, who has died after a stroke aged 83. Like most of his contemporaries who gained their experience by working in television – Philip Saville, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Ken Loach, Mike Newell, Michael Apted and Mike Leigh – Mackenzie went on to make feature films, notably his superb London-based gangster picture, The Long Good Friday (1980).

The television background trained Mackenzie to work quickly on taut and realistic narratives, within a tight budget and on schedule. One of his first jobs was as »

- Ronald Bergan

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R.I.P. Michael Gough

17 March 2011 6:02 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Michael Gough, the beloved British character actor whom many will remember from the pre-Chris Nolan "Batman" movies, has passed away aged 94. Born in Kuala Lumpur, Gough made his film debut in 1947 in "Blanche Fury" and went on to achieve fame in British television.

He made two memorable appearances as villains in "Doctor Who" - first as the titular villain of the second Doctor serial "The Celestial Toymaker" in 1966, then as a Time Lord councillor in league with Omega in the fifth Doctor serial "Arc of Infinity" in 1983. He also married Anneke Wills, an actress who played one of the Doctor's companions on the show.

Gough's other memorable small screen turns include a famous episode of "The Avengers" as the wheelchair-bound Dr. Armstrong, and his role as the British Prime Minister in Ian Curteis' "Suez 1956".

His big screen credits are even more impressive with key roles in Harold Pinter's "The Go-Between, »

- Garth Franklin

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2016 | 2015 | 2013 | 2011

4 items from 2011


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