IMDb > Fatal Attraction (1987)
Fatal Attraction
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Fatal Attraction (1987) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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6.9/10   44,902 votes »
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Director:
Writers (WGA):
James Dearden (screenplay)
James Dearden (short film)
Contact:
View company contact information for Fatal Attraction on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
18 September 1987 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
On the other side of drinks, dinner and a one night stand, lies a terrifying love story. See more »
Plot:
A married man's one night stand comes back to haunt him when that lover begins to stalk him and his family. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 8 wins & 17 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Justifiably one of the most talked-about movies ever See more (185 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Michael Douglas ... Dan Gallagher

Glenn Close ... Alex Forrest

Anne Archer ... Beth Gallagher
Ellen Hamilton Latzen ... Ellen Gallagher

Stuart Pankin ... Jimmy

Ellen Foley ... Hildy

Fred Gwynne ... Arthur
Meg Mundy ... Joan Rogerson
Tom Brennan ... Howard Rogerson

Lois Smith ... Martha

Mike Nussbaum ... Bob Drimmer
J.J. Johnston ... O'Rourke
Michael Arkin ... Lieutenant

Sam Coppola ... Fuselli (as Sam J. Coppola)
Eunice Prewitt ... Receptionist

Jane Krakowski ... Babysitter
Justine Johnston ... Real Estate Agent

Mary Joy ... Teacher
Christine Farrell ... Teacher
Marc McQue ... Chuck

James Eckhouse ... Man in Japanese Restaurant
Faith Geer ... Nurse

Carol Schneider ... Waitress
David Bates ... Executive

Anna Levine ... Secretary
Alicia Perusse ... Ellen's Friend

Christopher Rubin ... Lawyer
Thomas Saccio ... Bartender
Greg Scott ... Bar Patron
Chris Manor ... Doorman

Jonathan Brandis ... Party Guest
Joe Chapman ... Party Guest
Judi M. Durand ... Party Guest
Lillian Garrett ... Party Guest

J.D. Hall ... Party Guest
Barbara Harris ... Party Guest
Angelo Bruno Krakoff ... Party Guest
Carlo Steven Krakoff ... Party Guest
Amy Lyne ... Party Guest
David McCharen ... Party Guest
Larry Moss ... Party Guest
Mio Polo ... Party Guest
Jan Rabson ... Party Guest
Marilyn Schreffler ... Party Guest
Vladimir Skomarovsky ... Party Guest
Dennis Tufano ... Party Guest

Lynnanne Zager ... Party Guest
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
James 'Packy' Dolan ... Mover (uncredited)
Reese Golchin ... Bowler (uncredited)

Directed by
Adrian Lyne 
 
Writing credits
(WGA)
James Dearden (screenplay)

James Dearden (short film)

Produced by
Stanley R. Jaffe .... producer
Sherry Lansing .... producer
 
Original Music by
Maurice Jarre 
 
Cinematography by
Howard Atherton (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Peter E. Berger (edited by)
Michael Kahn 
 
Casting by
Risa Bramon Garcia  (as Risa Bramon)
Billy Hopkins 
 
Production Design by
Mel Bourne 
 
Art Direction by
Jack Blackman 
 
Set Decoration by
George DeTitta Sr.  (as George DeTitta)
 
Costume Design by
Ellen Mirojnick (costumes designed by)
 
Makeup Department
Richard Dean .... makeup artist
Lyndell Quiyou .... hair stylist
Doug Drexler .... special makeup effects artist (uncredited)
Michael R. Thomas .... slashed wrist effect makeup (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Christopher Cronyn .... unit production manager
Robert E. Warner .... unit production manager: re-shoot (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Robert V. Girolami .... first assistant director (as Robert Girolami)
Martha L. Mericka .... dga trainee (as Marty Mericka)
Jane Paul .... second assistant director
Chris Stoia .... second second assistant director (as Christopher Stoia)
David R. Ellis .... second unit director (uncredited)
Craig Haagensen .... second unit director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Gerald DeTitta .... set dresser (as Gerry DeTitta)
Ed Ferraro .... shop craftsman (as Eddie Ferraro)
George Gartland .... construction grip
Philip Saccio Jr. .... property person (as Phillip Saccio)
Thomas Saccio .... property master (as Tom Saccio)
Sylvia Trapanese .... art department coordinator
Michael Zansky .... chargeman scenic artist
Jerry Adams .... property manager (uncredited)
Philip Saccio .... assistant property master (uncredited)
Ginny Walsh .... property fabricator (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Dee Dee Goldner .... assistant sound editor
Robert G. Henderson .... supervising sound editor (as Robert Henderson)
Ellen Heuer .... foley: TAJ Soundworks
David M. Horton .... sound editor (as David Horton)
David J. Hudson .... re-recording mixer
Vito L. Ilardi .... sound recordist (as Vito Ilardi)
Nicholas Vincent Korda .... sound editor (as Nicholas Korda)
Bruce Lacey .... sound editor
Les Lazarowitz .... sound mixer
Mel Metcalfe .... re-recording mixer
Linda Murphy .... boom operator
Alan Robert Murray .... supervising sound editor
Greg Orloff .... foley: Taj Soundworks
Terry Porter .... re-recording mixer
John Roesch .... foley: TAJ Soundworks
Brooke Henderson Ward .... assistant sound editor
 
Special Effects by
Clive R. Kay .... special effects contact lenses (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Janet Brady .... stunts
Steve M. Davison .... stunts
Annie Ellis .... stunts
David R. Ellis .... stunt coordinator
David R. Ellis .... stunts (as David Ellis)
Freddie Hice .... stunts
Laurie Shepard .... stunts
Tracy Keehn-Dashnaw .... stunt double: Ann Archer (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
James 'Packy' Dolan .... chief lighting technician
James P. Dolan .... assistant chief lighting technician (as J.P. Dolan)
James Finnerty .... first company grip (as Jim Finnerty)
John Finnerty .... second company grip
Bill Gerardo .... second assistant photographer
Vinnie Gerardo .... first assistant photographer
Craig Haagensen .... camera operator
Andrew D. Schwartz .... still photographer
Robert M. Volpe .... dolly grip (as Bob Volte)
John Corso .... cinematographer: Steadicam (uncredited)
Chris Hayes .... additional camera operator (uncredited)
Tom Krueger .... focus puller (uncredited)
Michael Stone .... camera operator: new end sequence (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Paul Adler .... casting assistant
Heidi Levitt .... casting assistant
Riccardo Bertoni .... extras casting (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
William A. Campbell .... costumer: men's (as William Campbell)
Danajean Cicerchi .... costumer: women's
 
Editorial Department
Thomas R. Bryant .... assistant editor (as Tom Bryant)
Jack Garsha .... color timer
Martha Huntley .... assistant editor: New York
Richard J. Rossi .... assistant editor: New York (as Richard Rossi)
Diane Asnes Ruggeri .... assistant editor: New York
George C. Villaseñor .... assistant editor
Michael Carlin .... editing room assistant (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Dan Carlin Sr. .... music editor
Maurice Jarre .... orchestrator
Joel Moss .... music scoring mixer
Bob Bornstein .... music preparation (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Tom O'Donnell .... teamster captain
 
Other crew
Marion Billings .... publicist
Dane Chapin .... production assistant
Dan Curry .... title design
Lenard Dorfman .... location assistant
Ken Haber .... location manager (as Kenneth Haber)
Andrea Jaffe .... publicist
Mitchell Kapner .... production assistant
Janice Leibowitz .... production assistant
Charles M. Lum .... assistant location manager (as Charles Lum)
Sancha Mandy .... production assistant
Carol Mann .... assistant to the producers
Cheryl Ann Mironczuk .... assistant production office coordinator (as Cheryl Mironczuk)
Eric Myers .... unit publicist
Jonathan Nossiter .... assistant to Adrian Lyne
Trisha O'Brien .... assistant to the producers
Kay Rouse .... production assistant
Judy L. Ruskin .... assistant to Ellen Mirojnick (as Judy Ruskin Wong)
Pia Salk .... production assistant
Frank Serrano .... production assistant
Juliette Steyning-Brown .... production office coordinator
Renata Stoia .... script supervisor
Susan Towner .... assistant production auditor
Jane Tsighis .... production auditor
Barbara Zentar .... assistant to the producers
Doug Zimmerman .... production assistant
George Coutoupis .... photo double: Michael Douglas (uncredited)
Tim Tyler .... location assistant (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
119 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Dolby | Dolby Digital (5.1 surround)
Certification:
Argentina:18 | Australia:M | Brazil:18 | Canada:PA (Manitoba) | Canada:R (Nova Scotia/Ontario) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Chile:18 | Finland:K-16 | France:-12 | Iceland:16 | Ireland:18 | Italy:VM14 | Malaysia:(Banned) | Netherlands:12 | Norway:15 | Peru:18 | Philippines:R-18 | Portugal:M/16 | Singapore:M18 | South Korea:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:18 | UK:15 (re-rating) (2013) | UK:15 (theatrical re-release) (re-rating) (2013) | USA:R | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In a 2013 interview with CBS News, Glenn Close admitted that she would have rethought her portrayal of Alex Forrest, because of her fear that the film's popularity may have been a contributing factor towards mental health stigma. "I would read that script totally differently," Close said. "The astounding thing was that in my research for Fatal Attraction, I talked to two psychiatrists. Never did a mental disorder come up. Never did the possibility of that come up. That, of course, would be the first thing I would think of now."See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Dan and Beth's phone number is clearly visible on the phone when Alex calls him the morning after their night together[212] 316-6752. Later in the movie Alex calls information to see why his phone number can't be reached and quotes it as 212-555-8129.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Beth Gallagher:[to Dan] You better get going kiddo, we're gonna be late.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
SELECTIONS FROM PUCCINI'S MADAMA BUTTERFLYSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
64 out of 77 people found the following review useful.
Justifiably one of the most talked-about movies ever, 7 December 2003



There are a handful of movies out there that have become so ingrained in our collective dialogue as an American society, it's practically a crime to have not seen them. If you haven't experienced the joy of Casablanca, you probably haven't seen from where "Here's looking at you, kid" originally came. Ever heard someone make jokes about quarter pounders with cheese in France? That's Pulp Fiction, ladies and gentlemen. Ever have anyone make you an "offer you can't refure?" Well, that person's seen The Godfather. Ever had a former one-night stand try to inflict long-running physical and psychological pain on you and your family? Err...probably not, but if you haven't seen 1987's Fatal Attraction, you're missing out on one of the biggest pop-culture phenomenons of recent decades.

Because of Swimfan and other subpar (but, in Swimfan's case, guiltily entertaining) efforts of tribute and homage, the plot of Fatal Attraction (and maybe even its ending) is obvious before the movie even starts. Adrian Lyne's (last year's magnificent Unfaithful) film is about Dan Gallagher (Michael Douglas), a New York lawyer with an attractive wife (Anne Archer) and little girl who takes a walk on the wild side one weekend and has a passionate liason with an originally casual acquaintance, Alex Forrest (Glenn Close). Dan wants it all to be over right afterwards, but Alex doesn't let him cut it off that quickly. Dan begins being harrassed by Alex in mounting forms of revenge that eventually reach his family - and become deadly (cheesy writing, huh?). Alex's continual acts of vengeance aren't easy to fight back against, though, for Dan must try to keep his secret from his wife and deal with the moral and legal implications that become increasingly complicated.

If it sounds like a 'typical' movie of that sort, it is. Why? Because it was the prototype for all the rest of them to come. One can't really dock the movie for being the typical "affair goes dead wrong" movie, because it was the first one of its kind that truly perfected the formula. It'd be like saying Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is WAAAAY too much like 10 Things I Hate About You. The thing is, Fatal Attraction really defied the expectations that I had set for it. The movie starts out kind of like Lyne began last year's Unfaithful - happy family together, and the parents getting ready to go out to a soiree. At that evening's party, Dan, while away from his wife, runs into Alex for the first time, and the sparks begin to fly. Now, the movie's title kind of gives away the fact that the woman is going to go completely nuts on him later, but James Dearden's screenplay, and Glenn Close's careful rendering of her character makes Alex a decent person to begin with. I was immediately impressed that Alex isn't some creepy, eccentric vixen that looks like bad news to begin with.

The inevitable begins, and Dan's wife and child must go away for the weekend. Alex turns up at a meeting at Dan's law firm, and shortly thereafter the affair begins. Right before they engage in some of the most protracted and unintentionally funny sex in film history, Lyne gives us an exquisite little scene in a restaurant between Dan and Alex. This is one of the crucial scenes in the film, for it sets the tone for the rest of the movie. Unlike Unfaithful, the two don't spend an increasingly longer amount of time with each other and then hastily have sex. Their dialogue right before their first tryst is direct. Like consenting adults, they simply agree that they're going to do it. No dancing around his apartment to sexy jazz music, no braille cookbook seduction. They simply sign a verbal agreement and then go at it on the kitchen sink, complete with running water and Douglas's odd obsession with having Close's breast in his mouth. The rest of their weekend consists of sex, more sex, and even more sex, with the obligatory 'funny scene where they almost get caught doing it in public.' The movie really takes off on it's nail-biting, visceral course when Dan decides he must leave.

The woman goes nuts, and that's an understatement. Calls and unexpected visits occur. Alex calls the house, but just stays silent when Dan's wife answers. Family pets are murdered. The tension mounts unbearably. The whole section of the film leading up to its exciting conclusion really makes an amazing impact. I had a huge list of expectations for what certain things would happen, but most of them didn't. This may be the prototypical erotic revenge thriller, but it certainly jumps over some of its own limitations. Anne Archer, Dan's wife, is an interestingly written character, for she is unsuspecting of it all until, well, until Dan must break down and confess. There is no bra discovered that isn't hers, no story that doesn't check out with someone else, no 'why have you been so distant since that one weekend when I left you completely alone?' All of the tension in the movie lies with what Alex will do next to remind Dan that he can't just let her go. The movie throws out another convention by actually letting Alex meet Dan and his wife in an incredibly uncomfortable scene where Alex slyly obtains their phone number after it has been changed. Fatal Attraction, along with its incredible building suspense, becomes less and less of the cookie-cutter genre film that it's been categorized as. This is in part thanks to amazing work by Close. As the movie's 'villain,' she radiates a dangerous sexuality and inital vulnerability that makes a great combination. Once she goes apes**t on Dan, she's simply a blast to watch. In that 'please let me never cross paths with a woman like her' sense, of course.

I love Fatal Attraction for much of the same reason that I loved Unfaithful. Hidden carefully beneath the movie's "thriller" facade is actually an excellent morality fable. This is hinted at when Alex is introduced as a likeable, sympathetic character, but fully fleshed-out once Dan must go back to his family. Sure, the woman's a freak, but Dan was the one that had the affair with her, so he's somewhat responsible. He told her that things would have to end, but no affair can just be extinguished like that. When he nicely tells her that it can't continue, I actually kind of felt bad for Alex. Sex has an emotional attachment to it that Dan tried to put behind him, but Alex couldn't. There is a crucial plot twist introduced into the film nearly halfway through that I won't reveal here, but it adds most importantly to the whole idea of Dan's moral quandry. At times, I was torn. For a while, Alex is simply a fling that's hanging on and one actually feels sympathy for her somewhat. Sure, it's all dispelled by the end of the film, but for a while the movie really turns the preconceived notions of its characters upside-down. Dan is trying to get back to his family, but isn't he somewhat of a creep for screwing around in the first place? That's the rocky terrain of infidelity, and Lyne's film explores it with an underlying expertise that can be seen through all the knife-weilding and bunny-boiling.

The movie has a handful of truly exciting, somewhat violent scenes that add an extra punch to its escalating progress. At one point, Dan breaks into Alex's apartment and has a violent encounter with her as he tells her to quit messing with his family. Alex enacts schemes of such raw cruelty, it's easy to understand why Dan is scared to death of her. Nothing compares to the movie's violent, bloody finale that has become a movie thriller landmark (one word, guys: catfight). It's truly one of the most well-done and exciting action scenes in film, and it's a bravura closer to a movie that deserves nothing less. Sure, it may not do anything creative to tie up the ends of the movie, but I'm glad Lyne used such an explosive scene. On the Special Edition DVD, an alternate ending can be viewed, and I was disappointed - it may be more creative and mean more in the context of the film (and may be technically better), but I'll stick with punches, guns, and knives for my revenge flick finales any day. Fatal Attraction is and always will be one of the most exciting, nail-bitingly intense, and entertaining movies of all time. It got six Academy Award nominations in 1987, including nods to Glenn Close and Anne Archer AND Best Picture. That's a testament to how much of a phenomenon it was then, but the fact that it stands up so well even today says so much more. GRADE: A-

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Fatal Attraction (1987)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Anyone else think the secretary knew what was going on? jonathanstatsny
was Alex really pregnant??? hornyheather100
Why didn't they just script a son instead of a boyish little girl? mechminx
Have you ever experienced stalking? GuyfromCanada
Who else actually felt sorry for Alex? saint_sophie
In the Director's Commentary, A Chilling Little Detail Cultfilmfeverforever
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