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Extreme Prejudice (1987) Poster

Trivia

Nick Nolte modelled his character on Joaquin Jackson, a real Texas Ranger. Nolte spent three weeks in Texas with Jackson learning the day-to-day activities of a Ranger. Nolte took what he learned and incorporated it into his character; the mannerisms and dress.
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The scene in which Powers Boothe picks up a scorpion then crushes it with his bare hand was done in one take.
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Maria Conchita Alonso did all her own vocals during the bar scenes.
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The opening of the film which includes the military backgrounds of each member of Michael Ironside's mercenaries, was inspired by the similar opening to the hit TV show, The A-Team (1983).
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After filming of final shootout was done, Walter Hill was told to include more of it so he went back and shot more footage but in the end he cut it down because, in his words, "it got too big". This is probably why this scene has some continuity mistakes which are often thought to be caused by cuts made on violent scenes in order to avoid X rating.
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Nick Nolte lost more than 50 pounds to really get into his character.
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The title comes from a line of dialog written in the script. The line "terminate with extreme prejudice" first appears on film in Apocalypse Now (1979) (although it originates in the Bernard Conners novel "Don't Embarrass the Bureau"). Both films were written by John Milius.
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The film is considered to be a western by the film's writers and producer.
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Michael Ironside said in interview for A.V. Club in February 2015 that approximately 45 minutes were cut out of the original version of the movie. Andrew Robinson had a role which was completely cut out. Reason for that is because after seeing his first cut of the movie Walter Hill thought that "It looks like it's starring Michael Ironside, with Nick Nolte, Powers Boothe, and Rip Torn supporting him, so we're gonna cut the whole Andy Robinson side of the film out." Ironside said that in deleted plot part he and Robinson's character were playing CIA agents trying to do whole covert op, and Ironside's character was the go-between between the military side of the story, the police side of the story, and the government side of the story.
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TriStar Pictures studio executives disliked the first version of theatrical trailer so they made their own. However, their version of the trailer made the movie look like it's ex-soldiers vs Texas Ranger type of movie, which it isn't. Jerry Goldsmith composed the music for original trailer but after it was rejected the track which he composed was not used. Instead the trailer which was released included two tracks from other movies; Paul's Theme by Giorgio Moroder from Cat People (1982) and Evacuation by Mike Oldfield from The Killing Fields (1984).
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The film was first announced for production in 1976 with John Milius to direct from his own script. "It's very complicated," said Milius. "I've never been able to put what the movie's about in a few words. All I can say is it's a modern-day story about subversion and espionage." It was to be made in October 1976 in Texas, but Milius instead decided to make Big Wednesday (1978). The project was revived in the 1980s, when Walter Hill hired Harry Kleiner to rewrite it. Hill had known Kleiner from Bullitt (1968), on which Hill was an assistant director and Kleiner the writer; Hill was impressed by Kleiner's talent for writing and rewriting on the set daily, which he needed for this film.
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Nick Nolte got writer friend Peter Gent who had written North Dallas Forty (1979) to recommend a real-life Texas Ranger to act as a model for his character. Gent suggested veteran Ranger Joaquin Jackson.
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A funeral scene of sheriff Hank Pearson was deleted after first two screenings of the movie. The soundtrack release for the movie does however includes track called "The Funeral" which was composed by Jerry Goldsmith for that deleted scene.
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Michael Ironside said a highlight of the film was meeting composer Ry Cooder:

"Ry had an ancient guitar-it was about 100 years old -that he was using for the soundtrack, and it got stolen off the set when we were shooting. That was a priceless guitar that he'd brought in because he was giving Walter ideas on what he wanted to do. We were shooting down on one of the old sets, at the studio where they shot the burning of Atlanta in Gone With The Wind, and there were a lot of other things shooting there, so there was a lot of traffic going through the studio. I remember him coming back at one point, and he was all panicked. I said, "What's the matter?" He said, "I can't find my guitar!" Someone had just picked up his guitar case and walked off. I remember he was so devastated by that. He said, "It's not that they stole it; it's that they won't understand the value of it." He was just gutted by that. It was such a sad day".
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Tri Star announced the film as their Christmas release for the year which upset the filmmakers as they had planned to finish it by April.
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Walter Hill later said "I don't think it was understood how much genre parodying was involved in that picture. It rather mystified a lot of American critics but it has its defenders."
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Nick Nolte later said the response to the movie was "a little tougher" than the success of his previous collaboration with Walter Hill, 48 Hrs. (1982).
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Walter Hill had worked with Sam Peckinpah on The Getaway (1972) and said he "tipped my hat to Sam a couple of times" in the film.
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Joaquin Jackson later said he:

"More or less edited the script with Nick. We got more into the type of language Rangers use, as well as the Rangers' relationship with other law enforcement agencies - the federal narcotics people, FBI, etc. What I'm trying to get back to the press is that it all relates back to narcotics".
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Nick Nolte said the role made a change of pace for him:

"It was a chance to play a morally perfect character. Like Walter said, we spent a lot of time looking at old films to get this Old West flavor. We looked at Wayne films, at Cooper films, at Randolph Scott films. Yeah, there's a lot of High Noon (1952) in this movie. There's a lot of Howard Hawks director of Red River (1948). There's a lot of Sam Peckinpah... I needed to find the demeanour of how those '40s characters carried themselves - how they dressed and carried their guns".
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Walter Hill said of Nick Nolte: "I wanted someone who was representative of the tradition of the American West - taciturn, stoical, enduring. Someone who carried a lot of pain with him. I told Nick, 'The kind of thing I'm talking about is Cooperesque.' I had him look at a lot of Gary Cooper films".
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