8.3/10
999
27 user 13 critic

Yuki yukite, shingun (1987)

A documentary following Kenzo Okuzaki, a 62-year-old WW2 veteran notorious for his protests against Emperor Hirohito, as he tries to expose the needless executions of two Japanese soldiers during the war.

Director:

Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

9 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

In this uncomfortably intimate film, documentary filmmaker Kazuo Hara visits his ex-girlfriend Miyuki and records her new relationships.

Director: Kazuo Hara
Stars: Kazuo Hara, Miyuki Takeda, Sachiko Kobayashi
Documentary | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

Ichikawa's cameras follow the 1964 Summer Olympics from opening to closing ceremonies. Sometimes he focuses on spectators, as athletes pass in a blur; sometimes he isolates a competitor; ... See full summary »

Director: Kon Ichikawa
Stars: Abebe Bikila, Jack Douglas, Hirohito
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

An intimate portrait of the last years in the life of eccentric novelist Mitsuharu Inoue.

Director: Kazuo Hara
Stars: Mitsuharu Inoue, Hiroshi Noma, Jakuchô Setouchi
Onimasa (1982)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A yakuza melodrama, covering decades in the lives of Boss Onimasa, his adopted daughter Matsue, and his biological daughter Hanako.

Director: Hideo Gosha
Stars: Tatsuya Nakadai, Masako Natsume, Akiko Nakamura
Primary (1960)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Cinéma vérité feature that follows presidential hopefuls John F. Kennedy and Hubert H. Humphrey during the 1960 Wisconsin primary.

Director: Robert Drew
Stars: Robert Drew, Hubert H. Humphrey, Muriel Buck Humphrey
Muddy River (1981)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

In post-War Japan, a boy from a noodle store-owning family befriends a neighboring boy living in poverty.

Director: Kôhei Oguri
Stars: Takahiro Tamura, Mariko Kaga, Nobutaka Asahara
Documentary | Biography | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

This documentary tells the story of film director Aleksandr Medvedkin, throughout his life a sincere believer in communism, whose films were repeatedly banned in the Soviet Union. Modern ... See full summary »

Director: Chris Marker
Stars: Léonor Graser, Nikolai Izvolov, Kira Paramonova
Documentary | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.5/10 X  

Director Jonas Mekas provides an intimate glimpse of his personal life by constructing a feature length narrative from over 30 years of private home movie footage.

Director: Jonas Mekas
Stars: Jonas Mekas, Jane Brakhage, Stan Brakhage
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

In the last days of the Shogunate, a resourceful grifter seeks to outwit competing prostitutes, rebellious samurai and other inhabitants of a brothel in order to survive the hardened times.

Director: Yûzô Kawashima
Stars: Furankî Sakai, Sachiko Hidari, Yôko Minamida
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Russian provincial town in the middle of the 1930s Stalin's Great Purge. Ivan Lapshin, the head of the local police, does what he has to do. And he does it well.

Director: Aleksey German
Stars: Andrei Boltnev, Nina Ruslanova, Andrey Mironov
Walden (1969)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

A chronogical about life including self, family, friend, couple and idol in 6 reels

Director: Jonas Mekas
Stars: Timothy Leary, Ed Emshwiller, Franz Fuenstler
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

French essay film focusing on global political turmoil in the 1960s and '70s, particularly the rise of the New Left in France and the development of socialist movements in Latin America.

Director: Chris Marker
Stars: Laurence Cuvillier, Davos Hanich, François Maspero
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Kenzo Okuzaki ...
Himself
Riichi Aikawa
Masaichi Hamaguchi
Toshio Hara
Shichiro Kojima
Masao Koshimizu
Taro Maruyama
Toshiya Nomura
Shizumi Okuzaki
Eizaburo Oshima
Rinko Sakimoto
Yukio Seo
Iseko Shimamoto
Minoru Takami
Kichitaro Yamada
Edit

Storyline

This documentary was five years in the making, and revolves around 62-year-old Okuzaki Kenzo, a survivor of the battlefields of New Guinea in World War II who gained notoriety by slingshooting steel pinballs at Emperor Showa to protest against what he considered to be the ruler's war crimes. Setting out to conduct interviews with survivors and relatives, he finds the truth of the past to be elusive, achieving a breakthrough only when he confronts ex-Sergeant Yamada, who grudgingly admits the occurrence and instructional source of certain atrocities. Written by L.H.Wong <as9401k56@ntuvax.ntu.ac.sg>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary | War

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 May 1988 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El ejército desnudo del emperador sigue marchando  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$222,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Long, tough documentary forces you to think about what happened during World War Two and how documentaries are made
28 August 2005 | by (Glen Cove, New York) – See all my reviews

This is the story of Kenzo Okuzai a very strange man who is haunted by what happened back in New Guinea during the Second World War. What happened during the war was that while all the men were starving the officers had several soldiers executed on trumped up charges so that they could be used for food. This is a documentary about his long lonely crusade to put the souls of the dead to rest (ie.to give himself some peace of mind).

This is a very in your face film. Okuzai drives a car with a loudspeaker on the top and is covered with what I can only assume is an explanation of his cause. He challenges authority at every turn (he went to prison for shooting ball bearings at the Emperor... and murder) and does what ever he can to get his point across. Its makes you laugh and it makes you cringe (a case in point in the opening wedding ceremony where he gives a speech that is not to be believed, which is funny for what it says, but cringe inducing for when he says it). Okuzai forces you to consider how far would you go to correct a wrong that happened even 40 years before.

Watching the movie I was forced to reflect not only what it may have been like in the jungles during the war and what I would do to survive. What is the moral obligations we should follow when we are near death and trying to stay alive? The film also forces you to think about the role of a camera in the proceedings. We are with Kenzo Okuzai all along his odd trip as he attempts to comfort the families of the dead and as he confronts (and assaults) the officers who ordered the executions. There is no doubt that he is aware he is being filmed, so does that make him more or less confrontational? Is his behavior more or less genuine than it would be had the camera not been there? Its a tough call and as you watch it you really do have to reflect on what is the role of a film crew in filming actual events? Can we trust the actions of those being filmed? Its all something to think about.

If you get the chance see this film. Its an interesting look at a very odd man. I'm not sure that I liked Okuzai (which is the problem with the movie, he isn't really likable), but he did force me to think about life and film in several new ways.


26 of 28 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page