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Broadcast News (1987)

Take two rival TV reporters: one handsome, one talented, both male. Add one producer, female. Mix well and watch the sparks fly.

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Writer:

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Nominated for 7 Oscars. Another 13 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Blair Litton (as Joan Cusak)
Peter Hackes ...
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Robert Katims ...
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George Weln
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Gerald Grunick
Kimber Shoop ...
Young Tom
Dwayne Markee ...
Young Aaron
Gennie James ...
Young Jane
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Storyline

Basket-case network news producer Jane Craig falls for new reporter Tom Grunnick, a pretty boy who represents the trend towards entertainment news she despises. Aaron Altman, a talented but plain correspondent, carries an unrequited torch for Jane. Sparks fly between the three as the network prepares for big changes, and both the news and Jane must decide between style and substance. Written by Scott Renshaw <as.idc@forsythe.stanford.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

It's the story of their lives.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

25 December 1987 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Network News  »

Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$197,542 (USA) (20 December 1987)

Gross:

$51,249,404 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Albert Brooks revealed that when he first read the script, the scene where Aaron does a weekend broadcast simply noted "Something bad happens to Aaron on the air." Albert was watching CNN when a reporter he'd never seen before (and hasn't seen since) began sweating badly. Albert phoned writer/director James L. Brooks at three in the morning and stated that Aaron HAD to start sweating profusely. See more »

Goofs

When Tom and Jane return from their first dinner together, Tom is walking backwards and is just about to hit his head on a low archway, yet in the next shot he is still several feet away from it. See more »

Quotes

[On Aaron's sweating incident on the air]
Jane Craig: [on phone] It wasn't UNPRECEDENTED, was it?
Tom Granick: [on phone] Not unless you count "Singin' In the Rain".
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Crazy Credits

Albert Brooks' singing of "L'Edition Speciale" from the film also briefly appears in the end credits. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Backstory: Broadcast News (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

L'Edition Speciale
Written by Francis Cabrel
Performed by Francis Cabrel
Courtesy of Editions 31 (Paris)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Intelligent, brightly written newsroom comedy...
1 January 2007 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

BROADCAST NEWS opens with a series of brief vignettes that are a clever way of starting a story about TV anchors who have no clue as to what they're reporting about.

At a speech before a group of would-be reporters, all of whom are bored by her presentation, most of them leave. When the last one exits, the co-host of the event says quietly to HOLLY HUNTER: "I don't think there will be any Q&A." Subtle line in a brilliantly written low-key comedy, a farce about the show biz aspect of TV anchoring.

WILLIAM HURT is the inept news anchor who finds himself working with HOLLY HUNTER as the network anchorman. Hurt badly needs help in remedial reporting and Holly refuses to take the bait--at first. He knows he's only capable of looking good, but is not a reporter. He proves to be a quick study as long as his earpiece is working and he's getting all the straight info from executive producer Hunter.

Holly's other anchor friend (ALBERT BROOKS) helps by feeding her information she passes on to Hurt. Of course she becomes conflicted about her feelings for ace reporter Brooks and equally strong attraction to the pretty-boy anchorman Hurt, who's having his own dalliance with a pretty staff member.

You have to wait until twenty minutes before the film ends to find out which man she'll end up with. Brooks tells her that Hurt is the wrong one because he represents everything she's against. In this unpredictable comedy, there's no telling who Hunter (the neurotic heroine) will end up with.

Fittingly, HOLLY HUNTER, WILLIAM HURT and ALBERT BROOKS were all nominated for Oscars (Brooks in supporting role), as was the film itself and director/writer James L. Brooks. All in all, seven well deserved Oscar nominations.

The script doesn't opt for a conventional happy ending--and, in this case, that's the only flaw for the brilliant screenplay. I felt cheated and somewhat let down by the wistful conclusion.


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