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10 Directors to Watch: Xavier Legrand’s ‘Custody’ Wins Debut Feature Kudos

10 Directors to Watch: Xavier Legrand’s ‘Custody’ Wins Debut Feature Kudos
A self-taught director best known in France for his work as a stage actor, Legrand takes an everyday case of domestic violence an elevates it to riveting family drama in “Custody.” The movie, whose script he developed for several years, won two prizes, including best debut film, at the 2017 Venice film festival.

As a near-lifelong performer who appeared in Louis Malle’s “Au Revoir les Enfants” as a child, Legrand says he loves working with actors. He first tried his hand at directing in 2013 with the short film “Just Before Losing Everything,” which earned him an Oscar nomination, as well as a César award.

Custody” picks up where the short leaves off, once again suggesting rather than showing the domestic violence. “As Alfred Hitchcock said, ‘There is no terror in the bang, only in the anticipation of it,’ ” says Legrand, who also sees himself as a politically minded filmmaker.

“As directors, w e’re given
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Custody’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Custody’
My heart practically stopped on several occasions while watching writer-director Xavier Legrand’s “Just Before Losing Everything,” which depicts, practically in real time, the white-knuckle moments in which an abused wife manages to pry herself away from a dangerous and controlling husband. That film is just half an hour long, but it earned Legrand (a former child actor who played an anti-Semitic French student in “Au revoir les enfants”) his first Oscar nomination — I say his first because we will be seeing much more of this filmmaker in the years to come.

Legrand’s feature debut, “Custody,” continues the story of Miriam (Léa Drucker) and Antoine (Denis Ménochet), though one needn’t have seen the short to be fully invested in what happens when Antoine, using the leverage of the legal system, uses a court-decided shared-custody arrangement to force his way back into his ex’s life — although the slow-burn suspense will take much longer to build
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Back to school for a class act by Richard Mowe

Actress Sara Forestier and director Hélène Angel on the set of Elementary Photo: Unifrance The French, without wishing to sound chauvinistic, hold their education system in high regard. Cinema has reflected that interest in films from Jean Vigo’s Zero de Conduite in 1933, through the gentle documentary about life in a country infant school Etre et Avoir (2002) by Nicolas Phlibert to Laurent Cantet’s Cannes Palme d’Or winner The Class (2008), set in a raw inner city school. And let’s not forget Abdellatif Kechiche’s L’Esquive (2003), Louis Malle’s 1987 Au Revoir Les Enfants, Julie Bertuccelli’s School of Babel (2013), and Christophe Barratier’s 2004 The Chorus.

Joining the throng is director Hélène Angel with Elementary (Primaire) in which Sara Forestier plays a primary school teacher who has no time for a personal life and lives in an apartment in the grounds with her ten-year-old son.

Angel says: “Education is
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Nyff Announces 2017 Main Slate, Including ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ and More

Nyff Announces 2017 Main Slate, Including ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ and More
It’s beginning to look a lot like fall festival season. On the heels of announcements from Tiff and Venice, the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival has unveiled its Main Slate, including a number of returning faces, emerging talents, and some of the most anticipated films from the festival circuit this year.

This year’s Main Slate showcases a number of films honored at Cannes including Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or–winner “The Square,” Robin Campillo’s “Bpm,” and Agnès Varda & Jr’s “Faces Places.” Other Cannes standouts, including “The Rider” and “The Florida Project,” will also screen at Nyff.

Read MoreTIFF Reveals First Slate of 2017 Titles, Including ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Downsizing,’ and ‘Call Me By Your Name

Elsewhere, Aki Kaurismäki’s Silver Bear–winner “The Other Side of Hope” and Agnieszka Holland’s Alfred Bauer Prize–winner “Spoor” come to Nyff after Berlin bows.
See full article at Indiewire »

Classic French Film Festival Continues This Weekend – Day For Night, Eyes Without A Face, and Paris Belongs To Us

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series started last Friday and continues the next two weekends — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

All films are screened at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood).

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Classic French Film Festival Continues This Weekend – Cleo From 5 To 7, 35mm Prints of Last Year At Marienbad and Au Hazard Balthasar

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series started last Friday and continues the next two weekends — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

All films are screened at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood).

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival Kicks Off Friday with Au Revoir Les Enfants

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series starts this Friday, March 10th. — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

All films are screened at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood).

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints. Even more traditional,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival March 10th -26th at Webster University

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series — celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints. Even more traditional, we also offer a silent film with live music, and audiences are sure to delight in the Poor People of Paris
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: Tiff)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

The story of Toni Erdmann — which has a solid Rotten Tomatoes score of 91% — follows a father who is trying to reconnect with his adult daughter after the death of his dog. It sounds simple enough but, of course, the two couldn’t be more unalike. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 and where it won the Fipresci Prize. Since then, it
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 51 – The Documentaries of Louis Malle [Part 3]

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this episode, David and Trevor are joined by Keith Enright to discuss Eclipse Series 2: The Documentaries of Louis Malle.

About the films:

Over the course of a nearly forty-year career, Louis Malle forged a reputation as one of the world’s most versatile cinematic storytellers, with such widely acclaimed, and wide-ranging, masterpieces as Elevator to the Gallows, My Dinner with Andre, and Au revoir les enfants. At the same time, however, with less fanfare, Malle was creating a parallel, even more personal body of work as a documentary filmmaker. With the discerning eye of a true artist and the investigatory skills of a great journalist, Malle takes us from a street corner in Paris to
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 50 – The Documentaries of Louis Malle [Part 2]

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this episode, David and Trevor are joined by Keith Enright to discuss Eclipse Series 2: The Documentaries of Louis Malle.

About the films:

Over the course of a nearly forty-year career, Louis Malle forged a reputation as one of the world’s most versatile cinematic storytellers, with such widely acclaimed, and wide-ranging, masterpieces as Elevator to the Gallows, My Dinner with Andre, and Au revoir les enfants. At the same time, however, with less fanfare, Malle was creating a parallel, even more personal body of work as a documentary filmmaker. With the discerning eye of a true artist and the investigatory skills of a great journalist, Malle takes us from a street corner in Paris to
See full article at CriterionCast »

Irène Jacob: The Hollywood Interview

Irène Jacob Cuts Deep

By Alex Simon

French-Swiss actress Irène Jacob cemented her status as one of her generation’s greatest talents through her work with legendary Polish director Krzysztof Kieślowski: The Double Life of Veronique (1991, for which she was awarded Best Actress at Cannes) and the final chapter of his Three Colors Trilogy, Red (1994).

Jacob comes from an accomplished family: her father Maurice was a renowned French physicist, her mother a successful psychotherapist, and her three brothers are composed of two scientists and a musician. After making her film debut in Louis Malle’s Au Revoir Les Enfants in 1987, Jacob has literally not stopped working. Her latest film, written and directed by her co-star Arnaud Viard, is Paris Love Cut, Viard’s semi-autobiographical tale of a filmmaker trying to balance his personal life, career and sanity in an increasingly shifting landscape. Jacob is delightful as Viard’s very patient (and very pregnant) fiancée.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 49 – The Documentaries of Louis Malle [Part 1]

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this episode, David and Trevor are joined by Keith Enright to discuss Eclipse Series 2: The Documentaries of Louis Malle.

About the films:

Over the course of a nearly forty-year career, Louis Malle forged a reputation as one of the world’s most versatile cinematic storytellers, with such widely acclaimed, and wide-ranging, masterpieces as Elevator to the Gallows, My Dinner with Andre, and Au revoir les enfants. At the same time, however, with less fanfare, Malle was creating a parallel, even more personal body of work as a documentary filmmaker. With the discerning eye of a true artist and the investigatory skills of a great journalist, Malle takes us from a street corner in Paris to
See full article at CriterionCast »

Directors Who Found Success in Both the Best Picture and Best Foreign Language Film Categories

Pablo Larraín (Courtesy: Andrew Cowie/Afp)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

There’s one director this year that has a chance at being a major crossover success by having two separate films nominated in both the best picture and best foreign language film categories: Pablo Larraín. This filmmaker has Jackie as well as Neruda and could join an elite group of directors who been able to have films — or even one film — in both of these major categories.

Jackie, which stars Natalie Portman as Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, is considered a frontrunner in the Oscars race this year by this site’s namesake, The Hollywood Reporter’s Scott Feinberg. Neruda, which follows an inspector who hunts down Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, is Chile’s submission for best foreign language film this year and is considered a major threat in that contest. This would be a great feat — especially for someone who,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

The Furniture: How Subtly Is Paris Burning? (Not Very)

"The Furniture" our weekly series on Production Design. Here's Daniel Walber

This week marks 50 years since the release of Is Paris Burning? (not to be confused with documentary classic Paris is Burning) an epic that hasn’t quite stood the test of time. In the tradition of The Longest Day, it harnesses a cast of thousands to tell the story of a single, crucial moment of World War Two: The liberation of Paris. French stars like Jean-Paul Belmondo and Alain Delon take roles in the Resistance, while the likes of Kirk Douglas and Glenn Ford play American generals. There are cameos from Simone Signoret, George Chakiris and Anthony Perkins, to name only a few.

Directed by René Clément with a script by Gore Vidal and Francis Ford Coppola, you’d think it would be more popular. Still, it’s worth revisiting, and not only for its two Oscar nominations (art
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘The Affair’ Casts French Actress Irene Jacob for Season 3

  • The Wrap
‘The Affair’ Casts French Actress Irene Jacob for Season 3
Showtime’s “The Affair” has cast French actress Irène Jacob in a major role for Season 3, TheWrap has learned. Jacob will play Juliette Le Gall, who is running from her own secrets. She’ll be a new love interest of Noah’s (Dominic West) and will help him process a trauma from his past and understand himself a little better. Jacob is a BAFTA and César Award nominee. She was first introduced to audiences with “Au Revoir les Enfants,” a film directed by Louis Malle in which she played a piano teacher. Also Read: Emmy Contender Maura Tierney on Telling Her Mom 'I Hate You'.
See full article at The Wrap »

Classic French Film Festival March 4th -20th at Webster University

The Eighth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-produced by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series — celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the early 1990s, offering a comprehensive overview of French cinema.

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, and we’re especially pleased to present Jacques Rivette’s long-unavailable epic Out 1: Spectre Additional restoration highlights include Jean-Luc Godard’s A Married Woman and Max Ophüls’ too-little-seen From Mayerling To Sarajevo. Both Ophüls’ film and Louis Malle’s Elevator To The Gallows – with a jazz score by St. Louis-area native Miles Davis — screen from 35mm prints. All films will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (47- E. Lockwood)

Music fans will further delight in the Rats & People Motion Picture Orchestra’s accompaniment and original score for Carl Th. Dreyer’s
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Disc Deals For The Week: August 30th Through September 5th 2015

Thanks to everyone for supporting our site by buying through our affiliate links.

A note on Amazon deals, for those curious: sometimes third party sellers will suddenly appear as the main purchasing option on a product page, even though Amazon will sell it directly from themselves for the sale price that we have listed. If the sale price doesn’t show up, click on the “new” options, and look for Amazon’s listing.

I’ll keep this list updated throughout the week, as new deals are found, and others expire. If you find something that’s wrong, a broken link or price difference, feel free to tweet at me.

Deals On Amazon Us

Criterion Collection World War 2 films for (up to) 50% off Andrzej Wajda: Three War Films for $39.99 Au revoir les enfants for $22.49 The Bridge for $19.99 The Human Condition for $39.49 Ivan’s Childhood for $23.99 Overlord Blu-ray for $21.89 Roberto Rossellini
See full article at CriterionCast »

Movie Review – Au Revoir les Enfants (1987)

Au Revoir les Enfants, 1987

Directed by Louis Malle.

Starring Gaspard Manesse, Raphael Fejtö, Philippe Morier-Genoud and Francine Racette.

Synopsis:

Julien (Gaspard Manesse) is an ordinary boy. He’s not particularly different to the chatty children that run around the playground today. Though kicking each other with stilts would be a little risqué in this modern day and age. He joins the rabble in bullying the new kid, Jean Bonnet (as in “Easter Bunny!” *chortle, chortle*). But his passing comments and jibes soon turn into interest as the headmaster asks him to be kind to Bonnet (Raphaël Fejtö). His interest grows as, when the school is on high-alert, Jean is hidden away. In fact, a small group of boys are treated differently. At one point, Julien wakes up and witnesses Jean pray, with two small candles alongside his bed. The two boys bond together playing piano (and fancying the piano teacher
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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