"The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd"
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

7 items from 2016


Blair Brown Talks ‘Orange Is the New Black’ Season 4 Cliffhanger and That Threesome

23 June 2016 5:03 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

[Spoiler alert: This interview covers the entire fourth season of “Orange Is the New Black.” Do not read until you’ve watch the whole season.]

Orange Is the New Black” fans got a glimpse of Blair Brown’s celebrity inmate, Judy King, in the show’s third season, but Judy fully comes into her own in Season 4.

She arrives at Litchfield just as the guards have walked out and the prisoners are running free (sort of) through a hole in the fence. Throughout the course of the season, Judy bonds with people on both sides of the prison power divide (including Healy and Luschek among the guards, and Poussey and Yoga Jones among the inmates — ensnaring two of those four in a hilarious cell block threesome). But Judy always looks out for herself first, and the finale sees Judy seizing her chance at freedom before a prison riot instigated by Poussey’s death leaves her future entirely up in the air.

Brown tells Variety she’s having “conversations” about returning for Season 5, but doesn’t know what the future holds for either »

- Geoff Berkshire

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From Must-See TV to Peak TV: 20 Years of covering television

2 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

If you were a TV critic from 1956 to 1976, you would have witnessed some big changes in the business: the rise and fall of the Western as the dominant primetime genre, or the color TV boom, or CBS' shift from silly rural comedies to socially conscious ones like All in the Family and M*A*S*H. If you covered the beat from 1976 to 1996, you would have written about Hill Street Blues and its many imitators, the classic years of SNL, and the early days of original cable programming. Almost any 20-year span would give you a front row seat to enormous artistic and technological change. As of this week, I've been professionally writing about television for exactly 20 years(*), and it's safe to say that the only two-decade period that featured a more radical transformation in how television was made and consumed would be back when the medium was first introduced into America's living rooms. »

- Alan Sepinwall

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CNN’s ‘The Eighties’ Examines TV’s Most Influential Decade

29 March 2016 9:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

CNN’s decennial trips down memory lane continue with “The Eighties,” which kicks off its seven-part run March 31 with a two-hour installment devoted to television. Absorbing the flood of nostalgia associated with that, the great takeaway from this entertaining two hours is just how much the foundation for the current TV renaissance was built during those years, which, content-wise, just might be TV’s most influential decade.

Following “The Sixties” and “The Seventies,” “The Eighties” opens with two grand events from the period when TV could still be viewed as a water-cooler experience, simultaneously shared by a huge percentage of the population: the “Who Shot Jr?” episode of “Dallas,” and the “Mash” finale in 1983. In hindsight, those were huge blips on an Ekg that, in terms of such attractions, has been steadily weakening ever since, with the annual exception of the Super Bowl.

What really stands out, though, are the »

- Brian Lowry

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Punky Brewster: Actor George Gaynes Dies at 98

17 February 2016 2:09 PM, PST | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Actor George Gaynes died Monday, February 15, 2016. TV fans will remember Gaynes as the curmudgeonly foster and eventually adoptive father, Henry Warnimont, on the Punky Brewster TV series. Punky Brewster, along with Silver Spoons, was famously cancelled by NBC in 1986, only to be revived in first-run syndication through 1988. Gaynes and Soleil Moon Frye also voiced their characters on the animated Punky Brewster TV series, sometimes referred to as It's Punky Brewster.

The New York Times confirmed Gaynes passed away at daughter Iya Gaynes Falcone Brown's North Bend, Washington home. In addition to his daughter and her family, Gaynes leaves behind his wife of more than 62 years, actress Allyn Ann McLerie, a regular on The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd. Gaynes was predeceased by son, Matthew, in 1989.

Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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George Gaynes, ‘Punky Brewster’ and ‘Police Academy’ Star, Dies at 98

16 February 2016 6:52 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

George Gaynes, who portrayed an irritable foster parent on the ’80s sitcom “Punky Brewster,” the bewildered commandant in seven “Police Academy” films and a soap opera star with a crush on Dorothy Michaels, whom he doesn’t know is Dustin Hoffman’s character in drag, in the hit feature comedy “Tootsie,” died on Monday in North Bend, Wash. He was 98.

Gaynes, who was not only a character actor but a baritone singer, made hundreds of appearances both on TV comedies and dramas, as well as 35 films (counting both features and and made-for-tv movies) and many plays, musical comedies and even operas in the U.S. and Europe.

While Gaynes became immediately recognizable to TV viewers and filmgoers, he never achieved name recognition, let alone stardom.

On “Punky Brewster,” Gaynes played building manager Henry Warnimont, who finds an abandoned girl (Soleil Moon Frye) and becomes her foster parent and eventually her adoptive father. »

- Variety Staff

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George Gaynes, ‘Punky Brewster’ and ‘Police Academy’ Star, Dies at 98

16 February 2016 6:52 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

George Gaynes, who portrayed an irritable foster parent on the ’80s sitcom “Punky Brewster,” the bewildered commandant in seven “Police Academy” films and a soap opera star with a crush on Dorothy Michaels, whom he doesn’t know is Dustin Hoffman’s character in drag, in the hit feature comedy “Tootsie,” died on Monday in North Bend, Wash. He was 98.

Gaynes, who was not only a character actor but a baritone singer, made hundreds of appearances both on TV comedies and dramas, as well as 35 films (counting both features and and made-for-tv movies) and many plays, musical comedies and even operas in the U.S. and Europe.

While Gaynes became immediately recognizable to TV viewers and filmgoers, he never achieved name recognition, let alone stardom.

On “Punky Brewster,” Gaynes played building manager Henry Warnimont, who finds an abandoned girl (Soleil Moon Frye) and becomes her foster parent and eventually her adoptive father. »

- Variety Staff

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Fringe Vet: Series Became a 'Boy Show' After Launching With Female Hero

17 January 2016 11:12 AM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Perhaps Over There, Fox’s Fringe is in Season 8 and leaving Blair Brown with only the fondest memories.

But over here, Nina Sharp’s onetime portrayer has something to say about the defunct sci-fi series.

PhotosTVLine Turns 5: Fringe Betrayal, Chuck’s Proposal and More January 2011 Plot Twists

Appearing on Sunday at the Television Critics Association winter press tour, where she was promoting Season 4 of Orange Is the New Black, Brown said, “I loved my time on Fringe, but the truth is that was originally a story about a female protagonist [Olivia, played by Anna Torv]… and the show turned into a story about father »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

7 items from 2016


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