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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

1-20 of 24 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Leonard Nimoy lived long and prospered

27 February 2015 5:20 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Film Nerd 2.0 has become one of the things I am most closely identified with, which is fine by me. I think there is real value in talking about how we introduce media to our children, and there's absolutely value in talking about how that media affects them. It wasn't a column that I consciously set out to create, though. It just sort of gradually became clear that it was something I wanted to write, and the turning point, the moment of actual creation, was all because of "Star Trek." For Toshi, the 2009 film was not just his entry point to "Star Trek," but also his entry point to movies in general. When I took him to the theater to see the film, he stood the entire time, and he didn't want to be touched or spoken to or distracted in any way. He was fascinated, and he had a million questions afterwards. »

- Drew McWeeny

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Leonard Nimoy in His Own Words: How Spock Changed Me

27 February 2015 3:54 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Following Leonard Nimoy's passing, Et is looking back at the time we spent with the actor best known for his role as Mr. Spock in the original Star Trek television and movie series.

In his first interview with Et in 1982, Nimoy cherished the idea of giving fans more than they would get from the average TV show.

News: President Obama and Celebs React to Nimoy's Death

"The series, while it was extremely good entertainment, at the same time offered food for thought," Nimoy said at the time. "The messages are there and there are enough ideas present for people to interpret them as they see fit."

Nimoy dedicated himself to his job and enjoyed enriching people's lives through his work, as Et learned on the set of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

"There are two challenges here," Nimoy said in 1986. "One is to be different. The other is to try to be consistently better than the »

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13 Reasons Leonard Nimoy Was Even More Amazing Than You Knew

27 February 2015 1:41 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

“Loss of life is to be mourned, but only if the life was wasted.”

Spock said that once. The man behind those pointy rubber ears, Leonard Nimoy, passed on Friday at the age of 83, after losing a battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. His life will be celebrated, because it was not wasted. Here are just 13 of many reasons why:

News: Zachary Quinto and more stars share their memories of Nimoy

CBS

1. Obviously Spock: This one everyone knows. But we would be remiss not to mention it again. He breathed life into one of the most iconic characters in TV and movie history (and earned three Emmy nominations for it). Fun fact you might not know: Nimoy is actually the one who created the Vulcan salute, based on a Jewish blessing he saw when he was a boy.

2. And How He Embraced Spock: Earlier on in his career, Nimoy seemed to have a love-hate relationship with Spock »

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Leonard Nimoy 1931-2015: 6 non-Star Trek career highlights

27 February 2015 1:22 PM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Leonard Nimoy became an icon of science fiction in the 1960s for his timeless role in Star Trek as the Enterprise's chief science officer Mr Spock – a character he would play on and off for more than 45 years.

While Nimoy will always be best remembered for his work on the Star Trek television shows and movies, he also had an incredibly varied career as an accomplished writer, director, musician and photographer.

In celebration of Nimoy's life and legacy, we look back at six career highlights aside from his work in the Star Trek franchise.

1. Mission: Impossible (1969–71)

Nimoy became a household name in the pioneering science fiction series Star Trek, but even early on he sought to make his career choices as diverse as possible.

Following on the heels of Star Trek's shocking cancellation, Nimoy was cast in Mission: Impossible, another highly influential 1960s television series.

Nimoy became a viewer »

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Remembering the filmmaking talents of Leonard Nimoy

27 February 2015 1:05 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Leonard Nimoy will be remembered for many things. Foremost is creating an iconic character known the world over, but his contributions to the world of entertainment go far beyond what he achieved in front of the camera. He was also a writer, an artist and a director. As a filmmaker, he actually helmed two of the biggest hits of the 1980s, "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" and "Three Men and a Baby." If moviegoers should have any regrets for Nimoy it's that he only made a few more films after those blockbusters. But his legacy lives on in many ways. It certainly lives on with me. When you talk to most "Star Trek" fans, they are either of the age where they became fans of the franchise during its initial 60s run, when it was syndicated in the 70s or when it returned to television with "Star Trek: The Next Generation. »

- Gregory Ellwood

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Leonard Nimoy Dies Age 83

27 February 2015 11:49 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Leonard Nimoy, the well-loved actor who brought Spock to life in Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek, died on Monday. He was 83.

It goes without saying he will probably be best remembered by many for his performance as Jim Kirk’s half Vulcan, half human First Officer. But Nimoy was also an accomplished poet, artist, and folk musician. He appeared in numerous films and TV shows and turned his hand to directing.

Nimoy was cast as Spock in 1966, playing the logical half alien with a computer-like brain for its three seasons, until 1969 and earned two Emmy nominations. He went on to reprise the role for the Star Trek film franchise, while appearing in Star Trek: The Animated Series and Star Trek: The Next Generation. He also made cameos in J J Abrams’ reboot Star Trek and Star Trek: Into Darkness. Nimoy even directed Star Trek III: The Search For Spock »

- Claire Joanne Huxham

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Leonard Nimoy: 1931-2015

27 February 2015 11:13 AM, PST | IMDb News

Leonard Nimoy, the eloquent, baritone-voiced actor and director who will forever be remembered as the Starship Enterprise's supremely logical half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock, died on Friday in Los Angeles. He was 83 years old.

Although his most recent major television role was on Fox's "Fringe," Nimoy's work on the television series "Star Trek" led to Spock becoming one of the most beloved sci-fi characters in the history of the genre. It also earned him three Emmy nominations for the role. Today Spock's V-shaped Vulcan hand salute, accompanied by the gentle benediction, "Live long and prosper," is recognized around the world. The "Star Trek" franchise may have defined the better part of Nimoy's career and made him a pop culture icon, but the man was as versatile as he was famous. He authored a number of books, recorded several albums, directed television episodes and theatrical releases (including the 1987 comedy blockbuster 3 Men and a Baby) and won critical notice as a respected photographer over the course of his lifetime.

Born in Boston on March 26, 1931, to Yiddish-speaking Orthodox Jewish immigrants from Ukraine, Nimoy began acting in community theater at the age of eight. His first major role came at age 17, when he played Ralphie in an amateur production of Clifford Odets's "Awake and Sing." After receiving career advice from an actor in another Odets play making its pre-Broadway debut in Boston, he submitted an application to California's Pasadena Playhouse. Nimoy would then relocate to the West Coast using his earnings from selling vacuum cleaners.

Nimoy made his film debut at age 20 in the 1951 film Queen for a Day, and won a small role as a ballplayer in the film Rhubarb, which was released in the same year. His first movie lead was the title role in the 1952 film Kid Monk Baroni. Nimoy then took drama classes at Boston College in 1953.

Following a stint in the Army between 1953 and 1955, Nimoy had guest starring roles in a number of television series. Starting in 1958, he appeared in "Sea Hunt," "Highway Patrol," "Bonanza," "The Untouchables," "Get Smart" and "The Virginian." He also guest starred in an episode of "The Twilight Zone" titled "A Quality of Mercy," and would work with his future co-star and friend William Shatner in the "The Project Strigas Affair" episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E."

But it was Nimoy's role in a 1964 episode of "The Lieutenant" that caught the eye of a producer and writer named Gene Roddenberry, who cast Nimoy in his new series "Star Trek." Nimoy is the only member of "Star Trek's" main cast to appear in every episode of the series, including the original unaired pilot. Of the famous Vulcan salute, Nimoy once explained that he based it on the way the rabbis in his childhood held their hands while giving blessings. (He also invented the Vulcan nerve pinch when he and the "Trek" writers needed a non-violent means for Spock to overpower an enemy.) The series only ran until 1969, but went on to inspire a movie franchise and four spinoffs. Nimoy co-starred with the rest of the original cast in the first six installments of the theatrical series, starting with "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" in 1979. He also directed the third and fourth "Trek" films, 1984's Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and 1986's Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. Nimoy returned to play Spock Prime for J.J. Abrams' 2009 resurrection of the theatrical franchise and its sequel, Star Trek: Into Darkness.

After the original "Star Trek's" cancellation, Nimoy joined the cast of "Mission: Impossible" playing The Great Paris, a master of impersonation. The actor stayed with that series until 1971. He enjoyed roles in a number of television movies, eventually earning a best supporting actor Emmy nomination for "A Woman Called Golda" in 1982.

Nimoy did not limit his artistic exploration to stage and screen, however. He authored several books of poetry and two autobiographies, the first being the somewhat-controversial 1977 tome "I Am Not Spock," which examined his self-declared identity crisis brought on by being associated with the character. His second, 1995's "I Am Spock," revealed that he had reached a certain peace with the influence the role had on his life. He also recorded several albums, most of which are considered to be masterpieces of unintentional camp.

Nimoy was an avid photographer, having studied photography at the University of California, Los Angeles, in the 1970s. In 2002 he released a provocative collection of photographs titled "The Shekhina Project," which drew controversy for its depiction of Jewish female nudes. Five years after its publication, Nimoy examined the beauty in plus-sized women for 2007's "The Full Body Project."

Nimoy's final TV role was in "Fringe," in which he played genius scientist and Massive Dynamic CEO William Bell, and his final voice-acting role was for the animated film Zambezia.

The actor also was very active on social media, sharing affirmations and words of wisdom on Twitter accompanied by his sign-off, "LLAP," or "Live Long and Prosper." His final tweet, dated February 22, told his 1.13 million followers, "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. "

Nimoy is survived by his wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, his two children, director Adam Nimoy and Julie Nimoy, from his previous marriage to Sandra Zober, as well as a stepson and several grandchildren. »

- Melanie McFarland

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Leonard Nimoy, 1931-2015

27 February 2015 10:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Leonard Nimoy, who earned a place in the hearts of millions of genre fans for his timeless portrayal of Spock in Star Trek, has died in Los Angeles from pulmonary disease. He was 83.

Nimoy was born in Boston, Massachusetts, to a barbershop owner and a housewife. He relocated to California to join the Pasadena Playhouse and secured his first film role in 1951’s Queen For A Day.

He took on many roles in his career including the Mission: Impossible TV series in the 1970s, but will be best remembered for Spock, which he first portrayed in the Star Trek pilot in 1965.

Nimoy stayed on the Starship Enterprise for three seasons until 1969 and would reprise the role of the profoundly logical Vulcan seven times on the large screen including a cameo in Jj Abrams’ 2009 reboot.

Nimoy also directed Star Trek III: The Search For Spock in 1984, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home two years later and 3 Men And A Baby »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Leonard Nimoy Has Passed Away

27 February 2015 10:26 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

We’re sad to report that Leonard Nimoy has passed away at the age of 83.

The New York Times reports via Susan Bay Nimoy, Leonard's wife, that the prolific actor passed away this morning of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Nimoy is best remembered for playing Spock on Gene Roddenberry's Star Trek TV series from 1966 – 1969, reprising the role in Star Trek: The Animated Series and eight Star Trek movies, most recently in 2013's Star Trek Into Darkness. His acting career touched seven decades, beginning in 1951 and including roles in many memorable shows and films, including Mission: Impossible, Fringe, The Outer Limits, Night Gallery, The Brain EatersThe Man from U.N.C.L.E., Gunsmoke, and The Twilight Zone.

Nimoy also displayed admirable skills behind the camera, directing Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, 3 Men and a Baby, one episode of Night Gallery, and much more. »

- Derek Anderson

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Leonard Nimoy obituary

27 February 2015 10:11 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Versatile actor, director and photographer whose career was defined by his role as Star Trek’s Mr Spock

Few actors outside soap opera become defined by a single role to the exclusion of all else in their career. But that was the case for Leonard Nimoy, who has died aged 83. He did not simply play Mr Spock, first officer of the USS Enterprise in Star Trek – he was synonymous with him, even after taking on other parts and branching out into directing and photography.

Star Trek began life on television, running for three series between 1966 and 1969, and later spawned numerous spin-offs, including a run of films of varying quality, two of which (Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, from 1984, and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, from 1986) Nimoy directed. “I’m very proud of having been connected with the show,” he wrote in 1975. “I felt that it dealt with »

- Ryan Gilbey

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Leonard Nimoy of ‘Star Trek’ fame, dies at age 83

27 February 2015 10:02 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

This is illogical. Leonard Nimoy, age 83, has died. The director, writer, and legendary actor passed away Friday morning at his home in Bel Air, according to reports. Susan Bay Nimoy, Leonard’s wife of 26 years, confirmed the cause of death was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Copd). Mr. Nimoy had made it no secret that he suffered from Copd. He blamed his condition on years of smoking, despite having kicked the habit three decades ago, and implored his fans not to ever smoke. I quit smoking 30 yrs ago. Not soon enough. I have Copd. Grandpa says, quit now!! Llap — Leonard Nimoy (@TheRealNimoy) January 30, 2014 The iconic “Star Trek” actor had been hospitalized earlier in the week after firefighters responded to a medical call at Nimoy’s home. By that Sunday, Nimoy posted what would be his final tweet to his over 1.1 million followers. A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, »

- Donna Dickens

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Don't forget 'Three Men and a Baby' in your Leonard Nimoy tributes

27 February 2015 9:51 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Leonard Nimoy passed away on Friday (February 27) morning at the age of 83. Most obituaries are, for very logical reasons, concentrating on Nimoy's contributions to the "Star Trek" franchise and its fandom.  And don't let me stop you/them! But don't forget "Three Men and a Baby" in your tributes. I mean it. Perhaps because it's fun to make fun of Steve Guttenberg or because it's fun to make fun of baby-based farces, it's easy to overlook "Three Men and a Baby." Don't. "Three Men and a Baby" is an enjoyable and well-paced farce and it'll never not be amazing to me that Leonard Nimoy transitioned as a director from "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock" to "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" to a nimble comedy with Tom Selleck, Ted Danson and the aforementioned Guttenberg.  And he made the transition without skipping a beat. The reviews for "Three Men and a Baby" were warm, »

- Daniel Fienberg

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R.I.P. Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)

27 February 2015 9:45 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The New York Times is this evening reporting the very sad news that Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy has died at the age of 83.

Most famously remembered for his role as Spock in the original Star Trek television show and subsequent movie franchise, Nimoy was admitted to hospital yesterday falling ill. His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, confirmed his passing after he had been battling with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which he had announced last year – a disease he had attributed to his years of smoking, which he had given up almost thirty years ago.

Nimoy returned to the Star Trek universe most recently in J.J. Abrams’ franchise reboot Star Trek and its sequel Star Trek Into Darkness, and has also recently featured in TV’s The Big Bang Theory and Fringe and lending his voice to Transformers: Dark of the Moon. He also directed several movies, including Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, »

- Scott J. Davis

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Leonard Nimoy, 'Star Trek' Legend, Passes Away at 83

27 February 2015 9:36 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Leonard Nimoy, who helped us understand that logic did not run counter-intuitive to humanity, passed away today at 83. He played many roles and left many legacies, but we'll never stop thinking of him as Spock from "Star Trek."  Nimoy has been a nerd icon since the premiere of "Star Trek" in 1966, where he became a breakout star as the first officer of the USS Enterprise. His contributions to the role, and the "Star Trek" universe, were in part rooted in his faith -- including the "Vulcan salute," which was based on gestures he'd witnessed in shul.  Nimoy returned to the role of Spock several times since the original cancelation of "Star Trek," including in J.J. Abrams' reboot of the franchise in 2009. His interests beyond acting included art, photography and music -- he was also the director of many classic films, including "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" and "Three Men and a Baby. »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Leonard Nimoy, 'Star Trek' Legend, Passes Away at 83

27 February 2015 9:36 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Leonard Nimoy, who helped us understand that logic did not run counter-intuitive to humanity, passed away today at 83. He played many roles and left many legacies, but we'll never stop thinking of him as Spock from "Star Trek."  Nimoy has been a nerd icon since the premiere of "Star Trek" in 1966, where he became a breakout star as the first officer of the USS Enterprise. His contributions to the role, and the "Star Trek" universe, were in part rooted in his faith -- including the "Vulcan salute," which was based on gestures he'd witnessed in shul.  Nimoy returned to the role of Spock several times since the original cancelation of "Star Trek," including in J.J. Abrams' reboot of the franchise in 2009. His interests beyond acting included art, photography and music -- he was also the director of many classic films, including "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" and "Three Men and a Baby. »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Star Trek’s Leonard Nimoy Passes Away At Age 83

27 February 2015 9:30 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy has passed away today at the age of 83 from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Copd). The actor’s wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, confirmed his death this morning.

Nimoy was best known for his iconic role as Mr. Spock, the coldly logical first officer of the Starship Enterprise, in the original Star Trek TV series, which ran from 1966 to 1969. He would go on to reprise the role in a number of subsequent Star Trek films as well, including 2009’s reboot of the franchise and its sequel, Star Trek Into Darkness. Nimoy also tried his hand at directing several times throughout his career, including on Star Trek entries Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

Though the actor/director flirted with singing, songwriting and even some stage work, too, it’s the role of Spock that Nimoy will forever be remembered for. »

- Matt Joseph

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Star Trek's Leonard Nimoy Dead at 83, Played the Iconic, Beloved Mr. Spock; Co-Stars Tribute 'Extraordinary' Man

27 February 2015 9:23 AM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Star Trek icon Leonard Nimoy died at his Los Angeles home on Friday after a battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his wife Susan tells the New York Times. He was 83.

In addition to playing the U.S.S. Enterprise‘s highly logical Vulcan science officer Mr. Spock on the original Star Trek series — which next year marks the 50th anniversary of its launch — and its six big-screen continuances, Nimoy reprised the role in two episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation as well as in J.J. Abrams’ first two Star Trek reboot movies.

The actor’s TV credits also »

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Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek's Mr Spock, dies at age of 83

27 February 2015 9:20 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Leonard Nimoy has passed away at the age of 83.

The actor and filmmaker, who rose to fame as Mr Spock in the Star Trek TV series and movies, died from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his wife confirmed to The New York Times.

Nimoy revealed last year that he was suffering from the disease, caused by smoking in his younger years. He had been treated in hospital earlier this week.

Nimoy began his career in the early '50s teaching acting and appearing in B movies, such as 1952's Kid Monk Baroni, and TV roles. He also served in the United States Army in 1953.

In 1965, Nimoy played Mr Spock for the first time in the rejected Star Trek pilot 'The Cage'. He retained the role when the show was taken to series and portrayed the character on the small screen until 1969.

After success as Spock, Nimoy played Paris for two seasons »

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Leonard Nimoy Has Died at the Age of 83

27 February 2015 9:12 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I grew up with reruns of "Star Trek" and so I feel it is safe to say I grew up with Leonard Nimoy and his iconic Spock character so to learn today of Nimoy's death, confirmed by his wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, is some tremendously sad news as far as I'm concerned. Beyond starring as Spock, Nimoy also directed Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home not to mention 3 Men and a Baby. He reprised Spock on the most recent Star Trek reboots directed by J.J. Abrams, but beyond his work as the famous Vulcan character he had a starring role in the "Mission: Impossible" television series and his artistic endeavors outside feature films included poetry, photography and music. Nimoy died at his home in Bel Air, his wife confirming the cause was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He will be missed. »

- Brad Brevet

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Leonard Nimoy, Spock of 'Star Trek', Passes Away at 83

27 February 2015 8:46 AM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Leonard Nimoy, who gained legions of fans for his portrayal of Spock in the original Star Trek TV series, has passed away at the age of 83. The actor died earlier today at his home in the Bel-Air area of Los Angeles, with his wife Susan Bay Nimoy confirming that he passed away from end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Leonard Nimoy announced earlier this year that he had been diagnosed with the disease, which he attributed to several years of smoking, a habit which he had quit several decades ago. He was hospitalized earlier this week.

Leonard Nimoy was born on March 26, 1931 in Boston, Massachussetts to Ukrakinan-Jewish immigrants Dora and Max Nimoy, who owned a barbershop. He made his acting debut at the age of 20 in the 1951 film Queen For a Day, and had several guest-starring spots on shows such as Dragnet and Sea Hunt before he was cast as Spock »

- MovieWeb

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

1-20 of 24 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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