7.1/10
24,085
124 user 65 critic

Sid and Nancy (1986)

The relationship between Sid Vicious, bassist for British punk group The Sex Pistols, and his girlfriend Nancy Spungen is portrayed.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay)
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Popularity
3,110 ( 978)

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Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Debby Bishop ...
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Perry Benson ...
Tony London ...
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Rusty Blitz ...
John Spacely ...
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Storyline

Morbid biographical story of Sid Vicious, bassist with British punk group the Sex Pistols, and his girlfriend Nancy Spungen. When the Sex Pistols break up after their fateful US tour, Vicious attempts a solo career while in the grip of heroin addiction. One morning, Nancy is found stabbed to death and Sid is arrested for her murder. Written by Alexander Lum <aj_lum@postoffice. utas.edu. au>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Love kills


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

7 November 1986 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Sid and Nancy: Love Kills  »

Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$2,826,523 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Alex Cox, both he and Andrew Schofield did meet with John Lydon before the filming. According to Cox, Lydon noticed that Schofield was, like Cox, a Liverpudlian, rather than a Londoner like Lydon, and encouraged him to play the part as a Scouser rather than a Londoner. Cox took this as a sign that both of them agreed that it would be better to portray a more fictionalized version of the characters rather than a cold re-telling of facts. Cox claims that Lydon drank heavily at these meetings, which may explain why Lydon did not recall them. Cox stated in a book that contrary to Lydon's claims, his meeting with Schofield was not after the film's completion, but rather before Schofield had even been given the part. He was offered the part the next day. See more »

Goofs

During the taxi ride to the airport, the taxi cab is driving east bound on the San Mateo (California) Bridge. The airport is west. Specifically, the airport is 17 miles south of San Francisco, the San Mateo Bridge is about 5 miles south of SFO airport. See more »

Quotes

Malcolm: Phoebe - how would you like to supervise our Sidney for a month or two?
Phoebe: No way.
Malcolm: Go on; you'd be a good influence on the boy. Why not?
Phoebe: Infectious hepatitis, loony girlfriend, drugs?
Malcolm: Boys will be boys.
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Crazy Credits

"And introducing the young Cat Vicious in the role of Smoky, Sid and Nancy's child." See more »

Connections

Referenced in Nana: Love? Friendship? Nana and Shôji (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

Pretty Vacant
Performed by Andrew Schofield, Glen Matlock, Dave McIntosh, James Stevenson
Written by Steve Jones (as Jones) / Glen Matlock (as Matlock) / Paul Cook (as Cook) / John Lydon (as Rotten)
© Warner Bros Music/Glitterbest
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User Reviews

 
Masterful performances by Oldman and Webb
23 June 2003 | by (Redmond, WA) – See all my reviews

When I was 15, I loved this movie because I loved the Sex Pistols and everything punk. Now that I am twice that age, I love this film for its unflinching portrayal of two people's lives, despite how uncomfortable it makes us, how little we sympathize with them as people, or how hard it is for us to comprehend the choices they made. I personally believe at least part of the discomfort comes from the fact that at some level, we DO understand Sid and Nancy, their love for each other, and the choices they make beneath the haze of addiction.

I realize, seeing it with adult eyes, why my parents were so shocked I was watching this film in 1987. But ironically, it was the best anti-drug message I could have seen in my teenage years. In performances so masterful they make me wince, fight off nausea, and weep for their misfortune, Gary Oldman and Chloe Webb constructed characters no one would ever want to be. The supporting cast deserves accolades as well - in particular, Andrew Schofield turns in a seamless portrayal of Johnny Rotten, who, unlike Sid, knows full well Malcolm MacLaren created him.

Having read "And I Don't Want To Live This Life" by Debora Spungen, and having seen more than a handful of documentaries with live footage of the band throughout the years, what impressed me most was the consistency of tone that Oldman and Webb bring to their performances. They are spot-on, not just in stupor and excess, but in tenderness and rare moments of clarity. The movie's ending was unique among biopics where the truth is in dispute, in that it did not profess to know the answer to that burning question (did Sid kill Nancy?) any more than Sid knew himself.

Why watch a film about a couple of junkies who came from unremarkable backgrounds and disappeared into the bleakness of drug addiction? We seem to want our films to be about something loftier than ourselves. I view "Sid and Nancy" more as a play than a movie - we allow our plays to be about uncomfortable subjects and unhappy people, but seem to think that celluloid must be as bright as the projector light behind it. This film is a study in love and dysfunction; its characters are painfully imperfect but perfectly portrayed and we cannot help but respond, even if our response is the deep, squirming discomfort that leads us to say we disliked the whole experience.

I rated this film a very rare 9.


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