A Room with a View (1985) - News Poster

News

Golden Globes Go Heavy on Adaptation Nominations in TV but Not Film

Golden Globes Go Heavy on Adaptation Nominations in TV but Not Film
In a world of 500 scripted television series, one way creators are vying for the very limited attention of the audience — and to attract big-name talent — is by adapting already well-known works. Rather than having to start from the ground up when it comes to building the world, creating its characters and hooking viewers, adaptations come with a lot of the work already done. And with less risk, the rewards that are reaped automatically look that much bigger.

“It’s a massive draw because you have so much more information than you do when you just have a pilot script or a couple of episodes or even a full season. With the book, the format is so totally different [and] you have the ability to describe and develop and have so much character backstory, so it’s rife with things to help you bring these characters to life and tell the story really thoroughly,” says [link=nm
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Disaster Artist Movie Review: A Room with a View

  • ShockYa
The Disaster Artist Movie Review: A Room with a View
Oh hi, reader. Biopics about directors in Hollywood aren’t a new thing. Whether you have talent or not, movies like “Ed Wood” and “Hitchcock” show how difficult it is to make a feature film. With “The Disaster Artist”, James Franco takes a close-up look at Tommy Wiseau, the producer, star, writer, and director of “The […]

The post The Disaster Artist Movie Review: A Room with a View appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Howards End review – timely, careful remake explores class and race

Question at the core of Em Forster’s work of who will inherit England has perhaps never been as relevant since he first posed it

Time is a funny thing. To watch the most famous film version of Em Forster’s Howards End now is to watch the 1910 novel overlaid with another layer of history. Merchant Ivory’s rendition came out in 1992 and cemented the pair’s reputation – born in 1985 with their adaptation of Forster’s A Room With a View – as the purveyor of sumptuous Edwardian goods for the contemporary masses.

To watch it now is to be almost overwhelmed by the branding. Every scene is limned in golden sunlight, every costume ripples and rustles to perfection, hair is huge, vowels are rounded and wherever you turn either Helena Bonham-Carter or Vanessa Redgrave are Bonham-Cartering or Redgraving to the fullest limits of the law.

Related: Howards End on TV:
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rosemary Leach dies by Jennie Kermode - 2017-10-22 13:15:09

Rosemary Leach with Helena Bonham Carter in A Room With A View

Rosemary Leach, who received BAFTA nominations for her roles in A Room With A View and That'll Be The Day, has died following a short illness, her agent announced today. She was 81.

The Shropshire born actress focused most of her career on theatre and television, winning an Olivier Award for 84 Charing Cross Road and appearing in popular series The Jewel In The Crown and Berkeley Square. She was also known for her work in sitcom My Family, and as a reader on children's storytelling series Jackanory.

Leach is survived by actor husband Colin Starkey....
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

61st London Film Festival Review – Call Me By Your Name (2017)

Call Me By Your Name, 2017.

Directed by Luca Guadagnino.

Starring Armie Hammer, Timothee Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg and Esther Garrel.

Synopsis:

An American professor and his family are spending the summer at their Italian villa. His teenage son is captivated by the graduate student who arrives to work for his father. It’s a fascination that becomes mutual and grows into a love neither of them will ever forget.

Call Me By Your Name could so easily have been chosen for the Love Gala at this year’s London Film Festival, but they opted for On Chesil Beach instead. Whether it was the right decision remains to be seen, but director Luca Guadagnino’s story of the delicious agony of first love comes with a pedigree, although it doesn’t make a song and dance about it.

It’s written and produced by James Ivory. Yes, The James Ivory. He who,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

City of Florence Honors James Ivory at 'Room With a View' 30-Year Anniversary

City of Florence Honors James Ivory at 'Room With a View' 30-Year Anniversary
The city of Florence on Thursday honored director James Ivory with its highest civilian honor, the Fiorino d'Oro, during 30-year anniversary celebrations for his film A Room With a View. The Cinema Odeon held a gala screening afterward with the director and castmembers Helena Bonham Carter and Julian Sands

Florence's Mayor Dario Nardella called Ivory "a great ambassador for cinema," saying the film was "a real act of love towards Florence, and Florence embraces the maestro again today."

In the movie, based on the novel by E.M. Forster, a young Englishwoman (Bonham-Carter) tours Italy during the Edwardian era with her...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

James Ivory on ‘Call Me by Your Name’ and Why American Male Actors Won’t Do Nude Scenes (Exclusive)

James Ivory on ‘Call Me by Your Name’ and Why American Male Actors Won’t Do Nude Scenes (Exclusive)
The city of Florence feted director-writer James Ivory this week with its Fiorino d’Oro prize and three days of celebrations for the 30th anniversary of “A Room With a View,” the triple-Oscar-winning film that proved to be a game-changer for Ivory and his longtime producer and partner in life, Ismail Merchant. “A Room With a View” paved the way for their work on Hollywood pics such as “The Remains of the Day,” and was groundbreaking in its depiction of male nudity – a topic about which Ivory, who wrote the screenplay for new gay coming-of-age film “Call Me by Your Name,” directed by Luca Guadagnino, has strong feelings.

Ivory, 89, spoke with Variety from Florence. Here are excerpts from the interview, edited for concision and clarity.

One of the things that’s been pointed out about “Room” is the nudity in the scene when three men strip naked, jump in a lake, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film investors’ fear of the Bard is burying my Richard II, says James Ivory

Film investors’ fear of the Bard is burying my Richard II, says James Ivory
Veteran director claims financiers think he’s crazy for attempting Shakespeare adaptation

He directed Merchant-Ivory classics such as The Remains of the Day, Howards End and A Room with a View, but American director James Ivory is struggling to interest investors in his latest project. The problem, it seems, lies with his writer: William Shakespeare. For more than five years, Ivory has tried in vain to raise money for a cinema adaptation of Richard II.

Despite 50 years of critical acclaim and Oscar recognition, plus British actors Tom Hiddleston and Damian Lewis lined up to star in his production, financiers are refusing to part with their money. “They look at you like you’re crazy,” he said. “There is an assumption that there is no money to be made from such an investment.”

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Movie Review – Howards End: 25th Anniversary 4k Restoration (1992)

Howards End: 25th anniversary 4k restoration , 1992.

Directed by James Ivory.

Starring Emma Thompson, Anthony Hopkins, Helena Bonham Carter, Vanessa Redgrave, Samuel West, and Prunella Scales.

Synopsis:

Based on the novel by E M Forster, the story of three families. The Schlegels, two educated, politically minded sisters and their scholarly brother. The Wilcox family, headed by a wealthy businessman. And the Basts, she with a shady past and he constantly struggling to keep enough money coming into their down at heel home. They are all linked by the country house called Howards End.

In the late 80s and early 90s, the combination of producer Ishmael Merchant and director James Ivory could do no wrong. It had been a long haul – their company was founded in 1961 – but A Room With A View (1986) changed all that and they reached their peak with another E M Forster adaptation, Howards End (1992), followed swiftly by
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Win Viceroy’s House on Blu-ray

Author: Competitions

Based on the true story of the final months of British rule in India, Gurinder Chadha’s Viceroy’S House will release in the UK on Digital Download 24 July 2017 and on Blu-ray™ and DVD on 7 August 2017. To celebrate, we’re giving away 2 Blu-ray copies!

The release coincides with the 70th Anniversary of the Independence of India and the founding of Pakistan. After 300 years of British rulers, the last Viceroy, Lord Mountbatten, was charged with handing India back to its people. It is a story that is deeply personal to Gurinder, whose own family was caught up in the tragic events that unfolded as the Raj came to an end.

The film’s story unfolds within the great House. Upstairs lived Mountbatten, his wife, Lady Mountbatten and daughter; downstairs lived their 500 Hindu, Muslim, Sikh servants. As the political elite – Nehru, Jinnah and Gandhi – converged on the House to wrangle
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Platoon Reunion! Johnny Depp, Charlie Sheen and Kevin Dillion Celebrate Film's 30th Anniversary with House Party

Platoon Reunion! Johnny Depp, Charlie Sheen and Kevin Dillion Celebrate Film's 30th Anniversary with House Party
What do you get when Johnny Depp, Charlie Sheen and Kevin Dillion hang out together? A Platoon reunion!

The actors gathered at Depp’s Hollywood Hills home in Los Angeles on Sunday to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Oscar-winning Oliver Stone-directed film, according to a photo shared on Dillon’s Instagram.

Though the war drama, inspired by Stone’s tour of duty in Vietnam, premiered on Dec. 24, 1986, it appears it’s never too late for a get-together among former costars!

Over three decades ago, a 20-year-old Sheen starred as Stone’s onscreen alter ego Pfc Chris Taylor, whose
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Unbearable Rightness of Daniel Day-Lewis Retiring (Even if He Doesn’t Keep to It)

The Unbearable Rightness of Daniel Day-Lewis Retiring (Even if He Doesn’t Keep to It)
When Daniel Day-Lewis, the greatest screen actor of his generation, announced this week that he would be retiring from acting, I had the same initial thought that, I assume, most everyone else did. After a few befuddled seconds of “Why?” I prayed that his announcement wasn’t the euphemism for a health crisis. Once I decided that it probably wasn’t (this is, after all, the actor who took an open-ended sabbatical to build furniture), a conviction began to settle over me. While I had no clear idea why an artist as passionate and celebrated as Daniel Day-Lewis would want to cut his ties to acting (I was going to add “when he’s at the top of his game,” though when has Daniel Day-Lewis not been at the top of his game?), every bone in my body told me that he’d be back. At some point. In some eccentric Daniel Day-Lewis fashion. He
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why Daniel Day-Lewis' Retirement Is a Major Loss to the Movies

Why Daniel Day-Lewis' Retirement Is a Major Loss to the Movies
Daniel Day-Lewis has earned many accolades and awards over the last 35 years, but perhaps no one has more perfectly encapsulated this actor's appeal than comedian Paul F. Tompkins. Cast in a tiny part in 2007's There Will Be Blood opposite Day-Lewis, the stand-up comic later related what their first on-set encounter was like. "Now, I had been told that Daniel Day-Lewis was kind of an intense person," Tompkins says. "And he's really not. He's really … The Most Intense Person that has ever lived on Earth. He's not doing anything – he's
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Daniel Day-Lewis Retires from Acting

Daniel Day-Lewis, who has won three Academy Awards in a distinguished career, has decided to retire from acting, according to Variety. He has given no reason for his decision. His spokeswoman, Leslee Dart, says: "Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject." Day-Lewis first gained widespread recognition with his vastly different roles in two movies that happened to open in theaters on the same weekend in March 1986. In A Room with a View, he was featured as a priggish young man in Europe during the early days of the 20th century, while in My Beautiful...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Daniel Day-Lewis announces retirement by Jennie Kermode - 2017-06-20 23:21:56

Daniel Day Lewis in There Will Be Blood

Daniel Day-Lewis, the English-born star who won Best Actor Oscars for his roles in My Left Foot, There Will Be Blood and Lincoln, is retiring from acting, according to Variety. A spokesperson produced a short statement expressing his gratitude to his collaborators and audiences and noting that this was a private decision on which there will be no further comment.

Day-Lewis, who made a splash early on in his career with supporting roles in films like My Beautiful Laundrette and A Room With A View, has previously expressed concern about the level of press intrusion he has faced because of his profession. His final film, Phantom Thread, is directed by Paul Thomas Anderson and will be released later this year....
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting: Here Are the Roles We’ll Treasure the Most

  • Indiewire
Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting: Here Are the Roles We’ll Treasure the Most
Daniel Day-Lewis dropped a bombshell on fans of his work worldwide when he announced that he would be retiring from acting, just a few months before the release of his purported last role, in Paul Thomas-Anderson’s upcoming “Phantom Thread.” One of the world’s most coveted actors has a surprisingly nimble filmography. Even as it stretches back to the early eighties, Day-Lewis didn’t become a big name until his breakout role in Stephen Frears’ 1985 “My Beautiful Laundrette,” followed by a series of acclaimed roles in “A Room With a View,” “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” and “My Left Foot,” which won him the first of three Academy Awards. The other Oscars arrived for back-to-back roles in “There Will Be Blood” and “Lincoln,” leaving no doubt that the versatile performer was still at the top of his game.

See MoreDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From Acting

But these highlights are only a few of the astonishing achievements in the actor’s robust output. Here are the ones we’ll treasure for all time, while holding out hope that this legendary talent’s final performance will land a spot as well.

A Room With a View

It was one of his very last supporting roles, but Daniel Day-Lewis was the embodiment of Cecil Vyse in Merchant Ivory’s 1986 adaptation of E.M. Forster’s “A Room With a View.” In lesser hands, Lucy Honeychurch’s jilted suitor might have been little more than a prissy sad sack; Day-Lewis invested the character with empathy, as if Cecil knew his reach exceeded his grasp. While Lucy may have viewed their match as a prison narrowly escaped, Day-Lewis’ performance suggested a man who couldn’t get beyond his own pince-nez, but loved her so much that he let her go. —Dana Harris

The Age of Innocence” The emotions in Day-Lewis’s character are often big and ever present. But the performances that best showcase his talent are when he plays a more genteel character – his manner poised, cadence deliberate, body at rest. Yet in playing Newland Archer in Edith Wharton’s rigid 19th Century high society, he is effortless in accessing the desperate yearning that lies beneath his impossibly calm demeanor. His ability to translate complex thoughts, burning emotions and his character’s interior life through a completely placid surface is a marvel. —Chris O’Falt “Gangs of New York

There’s a titanic force lurking under each of Day-Lewis’ roles, but nowhere was that energy unleashed better than in Martin Scorsese’s 2002 city-spanning epic “Gangs of New York.” Bill the Butcher combined the actor’s ferocity with an unbridled villainous streak, an antagonist as evil as he is charming. Day-Lewis has always excelled in quiet roles, but Bill is a reminder that his flair for the theatrical is rarely equalled. Watching Bill play to an audience inside a rowdy theater or to a gathered crowd of terrified citizens, there’s a twisted thrill in seeing a true performer playing a true performer. —Steve Greene

The Last of the Mohicans” Arguably the actor’s most dreamy, overtly romantic role, Day-Lewis’ turn in Michael Mann’s 1992 historical action-adventure is both totally swoon-worthy and emotionally satisfying. As the adopted son of the eponymous last of the Mohican tribe, Day-Lewis plays his Hawkeye as a hero in the most classic sense, but aided by the actor’s formidable chops, the role (and the film) take on added dimension and complexity. Mann’s film is a heart-pounding adventure that doesn’t skimp on the tough stuff (people are scalped and burnt alive and commit suicide in order to escape worse fates, and that’s just the wide strokes), and it’s grounded by Day-Lewis’ trademark dedication and sincerity to the essential beats of his characters. Slipping easily between breakneck adventure (few movies contain so many scenes of artful running through the woods as “Mohicans”) and dreamy leading man (his chemistry with Madeleine Stowe all but aches right off the screen), turning in one of his more overlooked performances in a long line of lauded roles. It’s a film, and a part, that satisfies even more than two decades later. —Kate Erbland “Lincoln”

Day-Lewis won this third Best Actor Oscar — more than any actor in history — for playing the title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” because the movie is unimaginable without him. It took years for Spielberg to convince the recalcitrant Brit to play the American icon. Always willing to wait years between cherry-picked roles, replenishing his batteries by reengaging with the world, Day-Lewis finally broke down after Tony Kushner’s sprawling script focused on January 1865, when Lincoln maneuvered Congress into passing the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which ended slavery in America. “The important thing is they got Lincoln,” Lincoln biographer Doris Kearns Goodwin told me at the L.A. premiere, “his stooped walk, his high-pitched voice, his humor.”

Day-Lewis is a draw for moviegoers because when the match is perfect between director and role, when it feels right, he gives his all. He embraces a role so totally that it consumes and overtakes him. He loses himself in the part throughout production. As usual, Day-Lewis’s preparation was intense. He worked in seclusion until he sent Spielberg tape recorder audio of his approximation of the 16h president’s reedy tenor. He nailed his first scene on-set, an eight-minute speech about the Emancipation Proclamation, on the first take with no on-set rehearsal. Day-Lewis stayed in character throughout the shoot, addressed by all as “Mr. President.” No socializing on set saves energy, Day-Lewis has said. It’s fair to say that Day-Lewis is Abraham Lincoln, and the people went to see it because the actor was in it. —Anne Thompson

My Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown

Jim Sheridan’s period drama revolves about Christy Brown, the cerebral palsy-stricken painter who struggles to engage with the family around him until he discovers the one vocation he can control with his foot. However, that summary barely gets to the essence of the movie’s emotional core. It’s a naturally engaging story about perseverance against daunting physical challenges, made all the more heartbreaking by the intolerant times in which it takes place — but it would be nothing without the young Day-Lewis in the lead role, one that few actors could tackle without risking accusations of parody. Instead, he turns Brown into a vibrating, energetic creative figure battling to express his emotions and overcome the pity that surrounds him at every turn. It’s at once heartbreaking and hopeful, a testament to perseverance in which the performance embodies the themes to its core. Day-Lewis won his first Oscar for the role, and even as he continued to tackle new challenges, he already confirmed his mastery at this early stage. —Eric Kohn

My Beautiful Laundrette

From the start of his career Day-Lewis showed a penchant for muscular, angry and violent roles, starting with Stephen Frears’s searing 16 mm portrait of Margaret Thatcher’s London, “My Beautiful Laundrette,” which jumped from TV movie to arthouse phenomenon at the Edinburgh Film Festival. “I spent most of my time on the front line of London street life,” Day-Lewis said at the 2013 Santa Barbara Film Festival, “playing soccer, fighting on the school playground, and rebelling against authority and the British class system.” A controversial early exploration of sex, race and class, “My Beautiful Launderette” broke out Lewis, director Frears, rookie screenwriter Hanif Kureishi (who earned an Oscar nomination) and Working Title Films. With swaggering, sexy humor, Day-Lewis played Johnny, the street-tough ex-National Front boyfriend of Omar (Gordon Warnecke), the son of a Pakistani immigrant, who helps his childhood friend to renovate his uncle’s Battersea laundrette. Fears cast Day-Lewis after meeting him and asking him about his South London accent. Frears said: “‘You’re the son of a poet laureate, why are you speaking like that?’ He said he’d been to a comprehensive and had adopted it as a defence. Then he wrote me a letter saying he’d kill me if he wasn’t cast.” No one knew “My Beautiful Laundrette” would become an iconic film about the 1980s. —Anne Thompson

The Unbearable Lightness of Being” Day-Lewis was a perfect if unexpected choice to play Tomas, the detached lover at the center of this erotically charged adaptation of Czech novelist Milan Kundera’s most famous work. Disciplined in his practice surrounding sex and romantic attachments, Tomas bounces between Sabina (Lena Olin) and Tereza (Juliette Binoche) as both ravenous lover and aloof philosopher. Day-Lewis brings a perfect blend of lithe sexuality and mystery to Tomas, light on his feet and heavy in the head. He famously learned Czech for the part (a notoriously difficult language), and as a result his accent is spot on. What else would you expect from the man who made “method acting” a household term? —Jude Dry “There Will Be Blood

His voice lowered to a rumbling baritone beneath a scruffy mustache, Daniel Plainview becomes an extraordinary figure of capitalist intensity within a matter of minutes. Paul Thomas-Anderson’s most audacious filmmaking feat was matched by Day-Lewis’ remarkable transformation into the scheming, relentless oil miner and the empire he cobbles together in the heat. From the virtuosic intensity of his early management of a drilling company to the psychotic extremes of his final stage, Plainview is emblematic of the darkness lurking at the center of the American dream — which is why it’s all the more extraordinary that he’s played by an Englishman.

But of course, he’s not just an Englishman, he’s Daniel Day-Lewis, an actor so capable of transforming himself that in “There Will Be Blood” he seems to be reborn before our very eyes. Hovering on the edge of camp, he manages to take a line that on paper sounds patently ridiculous — you know, something about drinking someone else’s milkshake — and turn it into an iconic moment in film history, one loaded with the rage of boundless American greed. He was a lock for Best Actor the moment the cameras stopped rolling.

Related storiesDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From ActingIsabelle Huppert, Mariachi and a History Lesson: Cannes Celebrates Its 70th Year With a Lively NightMark Boal and Annapurna Pictures Are Getting Into the Documentary Business
See full article at Indiewire »

Daniel Day-Lewis to quit acting

  • ScreenDaily
Daniel Day-Lewis to quit acting
Three-time Oscar-winner’s last film will be Phantom Thread.

Daniel Day-Lewis, regarded in some quarters as the greatest film actor of his generation if not of all time, is to quit acting, his spokesperson said in a statement released on Tuesday.

The statement read: “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject.”

The three-time Oscar winner is working on what now appears to be his final film, Paul Thomas Anderson’s London haute couture drama Phantom Thread, which is scheduled to open on December 25 through Focus Features. Universal handles international distribution and Annapurna Pictures is producing the project, now in post.

The development immediately transforms Day-Lewis’ reunion with Anderson following his Oscar-winning turn in There Will Be Blood into an even
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Shocker! Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting (Exclusive)

Shocker! Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting (Exclusive)
Three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis, widely considered one of the preeminent actors of his generation, is retiring from acting, Variety has learned.

The 60-year-old star, who has played presidents, writers, and gang leaders in a career that has spanned four decades, has one final film awaiting release, an untitled drama set in the world of high fashion. It is scheduled to hit theaters on December 25, 2017 and reunites him with Paul Thomas Anderson, who directed Day-Lewis to a best actor Oscar in 2007’s “There Will Be Blood.” Day-Lewis intends to help promote the movie, according to a person familiar with his plans.

He did not give a reason for his retirement. In a statement, Day-Lewis’ spokeswoman, Leslee Dart, confirmed the news: “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject. ”

Related

Daniel Day-Lewis: His 12 Best Films

Day-Lewis is the only performer to ever win three best actor Oscars. He was honored for the title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” for his turn as a rapacious oil man in “There Will Be Blood,” and for his performance as writer and artist Christy Brown in “My Left Foot.” He earned two other Academy Award nominations for “Gangs of New York” and “In the Name of the Father.”

Day-Lewis has been praised for his shape-shifting acting and versatility. He is known for going to extreme lengths for his performances, frequently remaining in character off-screen. He has also starred in musicals (“Nine”), adventure epics (“The Last of the Mohicans“), and period dramas (“The Age of Innocence”).

The method master once learned Czech to play a philandering doctor in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” listened to Eminem records to channel rage in “Gangs of New York,” and confined himself to a wheelchair for “My Left Foot” to play Brown, who had cerebral palsy.

Day-Lewis, who is the son of poet Cecil Day-Lewis and English actress Jill Balcon, made his screen debut at the age of 14 in a bit part in 1971’s “Sunday, Bloody Sunday.” He first gained attention on the stage and on television before dazzling critics in 1985 with the one-two punch of “My Beautiful Laundrette” and “A Room With a View,” convincingly playing a street tough and an upper class Edwardian.

Although he has remained in high demand, Day-Lewis is also known as being extremely selective, often waiting years between projects. In the late ’90s and early aughts he appeared to give up acting for a while, reportedly working as a cobbler before Martin Scorsese convinced him to return to the screen for “Gangs of New York.”

Day-Lewis has three children and is married to writer and director Rebecca Miller.

Related storiesPoll: What's Daniel Day-Lewis' Best Film?Haim Debut New Song 'Right Now,' Paul Thomas Anderson-Directed Video -- Not a Moment Too SoonTalent Agent Gene Parseghian Dies at 72
See full article at Variety - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites