5.9/10
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122 user 41 critic

9½ Weeks (1986)

Nine 1/2 Weeks (original title)
A woman gets involved in an impersonal affair with a man. She barely knows about his life, only about the sex games they play, so the relationship begins to get complicated.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay) (as Patricia Knop) | 2 more credits »
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1,569 ( 235)

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3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Elizabeth
...
Molly
...
Harvey
...
Thea
...
Sue
William De Acutis ...
Ted
Dwight Weist ...
Farnsworth
Roderick Cook ...
Sinclair - the Critic
Victor Truro ...
Gallery Client
Justine Johnston ...
Bedding Saleswoman
Cintia Cruz ...
Whore
...
Chinatown Butcher
Lee Lai Sing ...
Angry Chinese Customer
Rudolph Willrich ...
Chinatown Shopper
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Storyline

An erotic story about a woman, the assistant of an art gallery, who gets involved in an impersonal affair with a man. She barely knows about his life, only about the sex games they play, so the relationship begins to get complicated. Written by Michel Rudoy <mdrc@hp9000a1.uam.mx>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

They Broke Every Rule See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

21 February 1986 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

9 1/2 Weeks  »

Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$6,734,844 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In an interview with Premiere magazine, Kim Basinger revealed that she owns "hours" of deleted scenes that MGM "thought were very psychologically damaging to people." The footage has never been made available for public viewing, even in the Director's Cut DVD edition. See more »

Goofs

When John is having dinner with Elizabeth dressed as a man, she smokes a cigar and coughs. John reaches for a glass of water to give to her and in the next shot it's an alcoholic beverage instead of water that she drinks. See more »

Quotes

John: You work and you work and you work. You meet with people you don't like, that you don't know, that you don't even want to know. And you try to sell them things and they try to sell you things, you go home, you listen to the wife nag and the kids bitch. You turn off the T.V., you wake up the next day and you do it all over again. But I'll tell you, the only thing that keeps me going is this chick. I've got this incredible chick on the side you see, and she is so hot, I can hardly believe it. ...
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Cheers: To All the Girls I've Loved Before (1988) See more »

Soundtracks

The Best Is Yet To Come
Performed by Luba
Written by Graham Lyle and Terry Britten
Courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
Produced by Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions
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Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
An ignored and Marginalized Film
1 April 2000 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Except perhaps in Paris where, until recently, it played in a cinema just off the Champs Elysee. This film has been condemned from just about every possible, so I will not try and defend it blow by blow. There is much to appreciate here, particularly when the film is looked at in the context of it being the '80's "Last Tango In Paris" - perhaps even self consciously so. The opening shot of "Nine 1/2 Weeks" echoes the famous opening of "Last Tango In Paris" and there are many parallels, but never to the point of it becoming overt.

If one accepts that form is to mirror content and apply that here it becomes clear that efforts were made to do so. The visual 'look' of both films not only mirror their content (for 'Tango': a muted color pallette, yet somehow lush, there is a layer over everything) but also their era. Both films deal with similar subject matter, in the context of the time in which they were made.

"Nine 1/2 Weeks" IS the '80's in much the way that "Last Tango..." is the '70's - the obsessions of an era are embodied in the struggle of two human bodies. Motions, touches are imbued with something beyond what is happening in the here and now. Very much in question here is the internal landscape of the characters involved - something one, as a filmmaker, would rather expose in a visual way as opposed to having characters pontificate about it (though Brando TALKS in "Last Tango..." it is very often what he doesn't say, the silence between two lines of dialogue, that SAY more) - in "Nine 1/2 Weeks" there are many visual cues/pointers as to the characters' states of mind, i.e. their apartments, the manner in which they are decorated stark, all straight lines (John) vs. cluttered and dusty (Liz). Elements like that make a film work.

The only moments of relief that Liz experiences in the film are when she is away from the city, away from John, amidst nature with the painter - in fact, one almost never sees John outside, just like Paul in "Last Tango..."

  • all these little cues about character should raise the questions in the


viewer's mind - what sort of person would?...


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