5.9/10
417
6 user 4 critic

Jiang shi jia zu: Jiang shi xian sheng xu ji (1986)

Modern grave robbing "archeologists" find perfectly preserved specimens from the past of a man, a woman, and their child. Unbeknownst to the scientist and his two bumbling assistants, these... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ching-Ying Lam ...
Master Lam
...
Yen
Fat Chung ...
Professor Kwok
Billy Lau ...
Chicken
Wing-Cheung Cheung ...
Father Vampire
Pauline Yu-Huan Wang ...
Mother Vampire
Moon Lee ...
Gigi
Chau Sang Lau ...
Sashimi
...
Hu
Kin-Wai Ho ...
Child Vampire
Kin-Yu Hon ...
Chia-Chia
Man-Kam Choi ...
Chia Chia's Brother
James Tien ...
Officer Tien
...
Hu's Neighbor
Tat-Wah Cho ...
Police Chief
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Storyline

Modern grave robbing "archeologists" find perfectly preserved specimens from the past of a man, a woman, and their child. Unbeknownst to the scientist and his two bumbling assistants, these are vampires immobilized only by the paper spells pasted on their foreheads. While transporting the child to a buyer, its spell blows off and the vampire child escapes and befriends some local children. Eventually, the parent vampires are also awakened and escape, but by now the local herbalist is on their trail to destroy them. Written by Reid Gagle

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Genres:

Comedy | Horror

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Release Date:

15 August 1986 (Hong Kong)  »

Also Known As:

Geung si ga zuk  »

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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

As the two vampires fly through the top of the burning truck, the lines pulling them into the air can be briefly seen. See more »

Connections

References Spooky Encounters (1980) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A ray of "sunshine"...
8 February 2006 | by (Brisbane, Australia.) – See all my reviews

This film is a complete change in tone from "Mr. Vampire". This sequel is really only an extension of the vampire-gone-loose idea, and is set in modern times. We have very little brought from the original, and what is brought (Lam Ching-Ying), is quite dis-connected anyway.

That said, this film is quite odd. Lam Ching-Ying is excellent as usual as the kind of hard-case Taoist priest, and we seem him up against vampires in the usual sense. Yuen Biao is quite under-used as the Taoist Priest's off-sider, and is quite clumsy and reluctant to engage in kung-fu technique it seems. I was waiting for him to really do something but it never really came for me. Most of this film is wrestling back and forth with a pair of vampires.

The vampires are portrayed (for my tastes), as too human. Whereas in Mr. Vampire 1, the corpse is sort of without personality, and has ceased being human, the vampires in this film are really portrayed as a family unit. We are asked to sympathise with them quite often.

Do not expect anything like Mr. Vampire 1 and you'll be fine. If you do, you may have to see it at least twice as I have to judge it on it's own merits. It really is a very separate film to the original, and the title does it more harm than good I believe.


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