Edit
April Fool's Day (1986) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Director Trademark (1) | Spoilers (8)
The movie's story-line has often been likened to Agatha Christie's "Ten Little Indians" (aka "And Then There Were None").
Due to the film being light on violence it received frequent airings on late night television, where it gained a large cult following.
Part of a 1980s cycle of slasher films with titles and subjects based around commemorative days and events that got made after the box-office success of 1978's Halloween (1978). The movies include that film's sequels, Prom Night (1980), Graduation Day (1981), My Bloody Valentine (1981)_ for Valentine's Day, the spoof _Saturday the 14th_, The Slumber Party Massacre (1982), April Fool's Day (1986), and Friday the 13th (1980) and its sequels.
Another horror movie utilized the same title around twenty-two years later with 2008's April Fool's Day (2008). This unrelated picture was not a remake but was also a slasher movie and unlike this 1986 film which underplayed the gore off-screen, the 2008 film was more in the tradition of the usual gory slasher pic that this film evoked and spoofed.
9 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's French title was Weekend of Terror, while in Germany release was titled The Horror Party.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The name of the literary work that Muffy St. John ( Deborah Foreman) quoted from was James Boswell's "Life of Samuel Johnson" (1791).
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
One of two mid-1980s murder-about-the-house comedies made by the Paramount Pictures studio. The other picture was the board-game spoof Clue (1985).
7 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Debut produced screenplay of writer Danilo Bach.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The picture was entirely shot in Canada's British Columbia with predominantly American actors.
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
A novelization written by Jeff Rovin was published by Pocket Books in 1986. Rovin embellished in a few instances (Muffy's maid was black, Rob cheated on Kit, etc.) but generally it's very faithful to both the movie and Danilo Bach's screenplay. The book was the first big tip-off for fans that the entire third act of the film had been removed; subsequently photos from the lengthy deleted sequence surfaced on back covers of various home video editions.
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The movie's producer Frank Mancuso Jr. had acted in various producing capacities on four "Friday the 13th" pictures of whose film studio on them was the same Paramount Pictures for this film.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Clayton Rohner and Deborah Goodrich both appear in Just One of the Guys (1985) that came out a year earlier.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
A hangman's rope noose was formed out of the letter "P" and a dagger out the letter "Y" in the film's original 'April Fool's Day" promo title logos. Moreover, a hangman's rope noose was formed out of pony-tails hair of the poster's central female figure (meant to be 'Deborah Foreman') who also held a dagger behind her back.
3 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The literary classic that one of the college friends was seen reading was John Milton's "Paradise Lost" (1667).
2 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Actress Deborah Foreman utilized "Sheryl Lee-like features and facial expressions" according to Allmovie.
2 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The cast assembled at a hotel in Vancouver just prior to filming and began hanging out to build a rapport and hone their characters to make it more believable that they were all actually friends.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Deborah Foreman came in early to audition for Muffy, but the director and producers didn't feel she was right for the part. They were close to signing several other actresses who backed out for various reasons. Foreman really wanted the part and petitioned for another audition - she blew everyone away the second time around and landed the role.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The filmmakers had difficulty casting the role of Harvey. The rest of the cast and crew had assembled in Vancouver, except for producer Frank Mancuso Jr., who stayed in L.A., desperately trying to find an actor to portray Harvey. Finally, he found Jay Baker and whisked him away to the shoot, which worked out well since the Harvey character was a bit of an outsider.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When they began shooting the dinner party scene, director Fred Walton commented in a 2016 interview with Daily Dead that "there was no collective energy whatsoever" and the scene was "flat." When they broke for lunch, Walton scolded the cast and when they returned to film the rest of the scene, everyone stepped up their game.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
While the crew was lighting a scene, Deborah Goodrich began reading a Cosmo questionnaire to her costars, which elicited a huge conversation that caught the attention of director Fred Walton. A few days later, Walton handed Goodrich the magazine and a new set of questions, and asked the actresses to improvise a scene which wound up in the final cut of the movie.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to director Fred Walton, Paramount executives didn't dislike the infamous deleted third act, they just felt that the movie would end on a higher note without it. However, producer Frank Mancuso Jr. insisted on tacking on the jack-in-the-box ending, which was shot in L.A. months after production had wrapped.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
At the beginning of the film, Griffin O'Neal's Skip character is blamed for an prank-turned-accident which leaves a ferryman disfigured. In a bizarre case of life imitating art, O'Neal was indicted on manslaughter charges the following year for a drug-induced boating mishap that resulted in the death of Francis Ford Coppola's son Gian-Carlo Coppola.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's lead cast featured two actresses who were first-named "Deborah": Deborah Goodrich and Deborah Foreman.
2 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Director Trademark 

Fred Walton: [Ticking] The ticking sound of a large Grandfather clock.
4 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Body Count: Zero.
The film originally had a much longer and more twisted ending. In the original script, after Muffy reveals the whole weekend was setup, the guests leave except for Rob, Kit, Chaz, and Nikki who sneak back to the house to prank Muffy for revenge. However when they return, Skip cracks and attempts to kill Muffy in a rage of jealousy. Rob jumps in and saves Muffy, killing Skip in the process. This ending actually was filmed but didn't make final cut as the studio opted for a more upbeat conclusion. This ending is identical to how the book plays out.
The film had an additional alternate ending scripted at one point. In that ending Muffy is left to believe she is alone on the island. Skip bursts out of a closet and 'cuts' Muffy's throat. She screams only to have the rest of the characters, thought to be gone, enter the room laughing - they pranked her back.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
There are two references to Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981), which Amy Steel starred in: A cat scares Skip before he "dies," just as it happens to Alice in Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981); and Arch gets hung upside down in a rope, just like Scott in Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981) .
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
All of the characters are "killed" off-screen thus providing clues to the audience that they did not actually die.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The ending and the final scene in Muffy's room were filmed three or four months after principal filming ended which explains the different hairstyles for Deborah Foreman and Leah Pinsent whom appear in the scene.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
As "Buffy" stabs the sliding doors that Kit runs through, you can briefly see a playful smile on her face; subtle foreshadowing to the fact that all the horror has been a hoax.
5 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Deborah Foreman played dual roles in this film. She played both Buffy St. John and as Muffy St. John. Both of her character's first names rhymed.
4 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page