7.5/10
6,296
83 user 26 critic

84 Charing Cross Road (1987)

True story of a transatlantic business correspondence about used books that developed into a close friendship.

Director:

(as David Jones)

Writers:

(book), (play) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Won 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Nora Doel
Jean De Baer ...
Maxine Stuart
Maurice Denham ...
George Martin
Eleanor David ...
Cecily Farr
...
Kay
...
Brian
...
Megan Wells
...
Bill Humphries
...
Ginny
Tom Isbell ...
Ed
...
Mrs. Boulton
...
The Lady from Delaware
...
Businessman on Plane
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Storyline

When a humorous script-reader in her New York apartment sees an ad in the Saturday Review of Literature for a bookstore in London that does mail order, she begins a very special correspondence and friendship with Frank Doel, the bookseller who works at Marks & Co., 84 Charing Cross Road. Written by Kathy Li

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

13 February 1987 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Nunca te vi, siempre te amé  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$24,350 (USA) (16 February 1987)

Gross:

$1,083,486 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This story is based on the life of Helene Hanff, who is portrayed by Anne Bancroft. See more »

Goofs

The Columbia University sit-in at Dodge Hall by the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) took place in February 1967, not January 1969 as depicted by in the film. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Businessman on plane: Your first trip to London?
Helene Hanff: Yes.
Businessman on plane: You want a word of advice? Don't trust the cab drivers; they'll take you five miles to go three blocks... and, uh, don't waste your time looking at a street map. Nobody can find their way around London - not even Londoners.
Helene Hanff: Maybe I should go to Baltimore instead.
Businessman on plane: No; you'll enjoy it. London's a great place. What kind of trip is it - business or pleasure?
Helene Hanff: Unfinished business.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The production teams in New York and London were almost completely separate, and the closing credits reflect this: in front of a split screen showing Helene in New York and Frank in London, the crews for the two cities scroll side by side. In most cases the same jobs are shown in both columns, and the job titles are then shown in the center. See more »

Connections

Features Brief Encounter (1945) See more »

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User Reviews

 
For once you shouldn't read the book
12 February 2002 | by (Belgium) – See all my reviews

When you first take a look at the story, 84CCR hasn't much going on for it. A movie about books(even worse: old books!), for 75% told off-screen and with two stars who don't share one scene together. It's a miracle that this movie has so much impact on the viewer. The atmosphere is really tense, it's like you're in that little dusty bookstore and you really like the characters, though you don't know that much about them. Great acting by all. Hopkins, playing a character that resembles the ones he played in Shadowlands and even Remains of the Day, is impossibly convincing in his role. Anne Bancroft, although sometimes slightly over the top when she talks to the viewer, makes a great match.

Rating:8/10

Most Memorable Movie Moment: Bancroft raving on about the works of John Donne.


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