Edit
ALF (TV Series 1986–1990) Poster

(1986–1990)

Trivia

The final episode ("Consider Me Gone") was, indeed, intended as a cliffhanger. At the time it was filmed, NBC was still up in the air over whether the show would be cancelled. The cliffhanger format was intended to help persuade NBC to give the show one more chance, if only to resolve the "To Be Continued" ending. Six years later, the TV movie Project: ALF (1996) finally brought closure - although the lack of the original human cast, and poor writing, cause many fans to reject Project: ALF as part of the show's canon.
Jump to: Spoilers (2)
In the years since the show's demise, both Max Wright and Anne Schedeen have stated that tensions were very high among the cast and crew. The technical demands of the series made for very long shooting schedules, and none of the actors enjoyed playing supporting roles to a puppet who always had the best lines.
The name of every episode is also the name of a song. Each is relevant to the episode's plot.
Series creator Paul Fusco told the cast and crew not to give away the secrets to ALF. Fusco operated the puppet most of the time, and provided the voice. However, when full body shots were needed, actor Mihaly 'Michu' Meszaros, who stood only two feet and nine inches tall, wore an ALF costume.
Max Wright was so ready to be done with the show that on the final day of taping, once it was over, he immediately cleaned out his dressing room and left the studio without saying goodbye to any of the cast or crew.
The Alf puppet was operated from various "trap doors" hidden within the set. This made filming the show somewhat more hazardous than a normal sitcom as the cast had to remember where each of doors were so that they could avoid them.
The character of baby Eric was written into the series when Anne Schedeen became pregnant in real life.
Max Wright later stated that while he disliked working on the program, he received many letters from fans stating how much joy and happiness ALF brought to them, and that gave him satisfaction.
When the show first aired in Germany it became an instant success. But it was unfortunate for the German city of "Alf", located at the Moselle river. The city-limits-signs, featuring the city's name, were stolen so many times, that the city council decided to buy a huge number of signs for sale.
The names of the Melmacian holidays and currencies mentioned by ALF in some episodes are actually the surnames of the crew-members.
Producer 'Paul Fusco' was the voice of ALF.
The character 'ALF' was ranked #8 in TV Guide's list of the "25 Greatest Sci-Fi Legends" (1 August 2004, Vol. 52, No. 31) and appears on one of three collectible covers.
Paul Fusco (ALF) and Beverly Archer (Mrs Bird) are the only actors to appear in both this series and Project: ALF (1996).
Unfortunately, only the edited (by 3-5 minutes per episode), syndicated versions of the ALF episodes are available as Region 1 DVDs. The German DVDs (Region 2) feature the full episodes as originally broadcast; they also include the English audio.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
ALF (1986) staff writer Jerry Stahl wrote a memoir called "Permanent Midnight" about becoming a success as a television writer on this show (as well as Moonlighting (1985) and Thirtysomething (1987)) while simultaneously dealing with his addiction to heroin. The book was made into the movie Permanent Midnight (1998), starring Ben Stiller as Stahl, and showed several scenes on the set of "ALF" (renamed "Mr. Chompers"), including a nightmarish drug-induced hallucination featuring the show's puppet.
Two kinds of ALF puppets were used: The first one was controlled by two puppeteers and used for all shots where ALF was shown only from the stomach up (most shots). Whenever ALF's entire body incl. his feet were visible(occasionally), another puppet with a human inside it was used. This is easily discernible as the faces of these two puppets look quite different from one another.
Due to the technical difficulties of taping the program and to not give away the secrets of ALF, the show was taped on a closed studio set with no audience. An audience laugh track was used to make it sound like it was recorded in front of a live audience.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Early episodes of the program showed ALF consuming alcohol. When NBC demanded the program to be more family friendly, this trait was discontinued.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Michael Eisner, head of The Walt Disney Company, made an unsuccessful bid to buy the series outright before Lorimar made a syndication deal with Alien Productions.
In 1987 and 1988, Topps issued a series of trading cards based on the show. And in packs of the cards, randomly inserted were Bouillabaisseball cards. Bouillabaisseball was a popular sport on ALF's home planet. It was like Baseball, only a rotting fish was thrown instead of a ball. The cards depicted some of the great and not so great players of the fictional game.
9 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
John Lamotta who played Trevor Ochmonek has said in an interview since this show ended he thought Alf was a piece of Sh$% and was the worse work he ever did.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
At the time, was one of the most expensive 30 minute sitcoms to produce due to all the technical elements required and long taping schedules. To help recoup costs, NBC licensed the character to other things such as toys, breakfast cereal and an animated TV series.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
ALF's name is Gordon Shumway and he is from the planet Melmac.
ALF stands for Alien Life Form.
In the 80s, Paul Fusco turned down several endorsements incl. from Burger King, Coca Cola, and Budweiser.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
During its entire run, ALF was shown Monday nights at 8:00 PM EST. It was also shown the same night and time as MacGyver on ABC.
The writers for the show tried to push the envelope on what type of jokes and scenarios they could get away with on the program. However, NBC pushed back on them and insisted on more "family friendly" scripts when they realized that ALF was attracting many younger viewers.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Irish national broadcaster RTÉ were forced to cancel an episode of ALF on 25 June 1990 as the FIFA World Cup game between Republic of Ireland and Romania went into extra time and penalties. Although Ireland won and the nation celebrated the historic achievement, some viewers complained that the episode was not shown.
7 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
ALF season 5 became Project: ALF (1996).
8 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Should the show have gone on for a 5th year, the series would have taken place at a military base where ALF was separated from the Tanners after being caught in the final episode.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
NBC originally promised Paul Fusco that no matter the shows fate, it would receive a proper ending. The show was cancelled and no finale was given until Project: ALF 6 years later on ABC.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Reportedly, during the fourth season, tensions were so high , Max Wright had a meltdown where he attacked the physical ALF puppet and screamed "Put us all on sticks. We're all Puppets!"
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to producer Bernie Brillstein, the scripts on Monday were funny. By Friday, Paul Fusco gave all the funny dialogue to ALF.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
During the filming of 1 episode, Paul Fusco in character as ALF mocked people whom suffer from Tourette Syndrome by cussing rude words and the cast and crew cracked up laughing when ALF repeatedly says the 'A' word.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

In the TV movie sequel Project: ALF (1996) it is revealed that the Tanners were relocated by the Federal Witness Protection Program to Mozambique after ALF is captured by the alien task force in the finale ALF: Consider Me Gone (1990).
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The sitcom's ending which ALF is captured by the alien task force - ALF: Considered Me Gone (1990) didn't make Mojo.com's Top 10 Saddest Sitcom Moments.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page