A View to a Kill
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 28 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Class of 85 – A View to a Kill

20 August 2015 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Welcome to the HeyUGuys Class of ’85! 1985 was a fine year for Hollywood. Icons fell under the stampede for sequels while future classics were created. It’s time to look back. In the coming weeks and months the HeyUGuys team will focus on some of best from ’85, exploring their legacy and capturing something of

The post Class of 85 – A View to a Kill appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Rob Keeling

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22 best and worst Bond theme songs ranked: Every single's here, but which are classics and which need their 00 status revoked?

20 July 2015 8:18 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

According to Spectre director Sam Mendes, we'll soon find out who'll be joining the illustrious ranks of Shirley Bassey, Paul McCartney and Rita Coolidge (!) in belting out a James Bond theme.

To mark the occasion, we've gone back through every single 007 song to find out which ones are earworms and which need their 00 status revoked. A quick point to note: we've discounted instrumentals so the opening credits pieces from Dr No and On Her Majesty's Secret Service are not on the list.

22. 'Another Way to Die' - Jack White & Alicia Keys (2008)

The first and only duet in the entire Bond theme back catalogue, on paper this sounded great but what emerged was a sludgy, lifeless and unremarkable track that went in one ear and out the other.

21. 'Die Another Day' - Madonna (2002)

Compounding the horror of her on-screen cameo in this stinker of a film is Madonna's »

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James Bond 007: revisiting Licence To Kill

5 July 2015 2:51 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Before Casino Royale took James Bond down a darker path, there was Timothy Dalton's final 007 outing, Licence To Kill...

So this is the anti-Bond. Stripped of the requisite wit and mischief. Short of temper, heavy of touch. The SPECTREs of yore replaced by a drugs cartel. World domination downgraded to a heroin monopoly. Glamour smothered by grit. Joy drowned in the bloodshed. The icon of British cinema reduced to an American cop show – MI6 Vice, Hawaii 007 – timeless style swamped by the vulgarity and cash of the late-1980s, a case of ‘Sayonara, Mr Bond’ and everything you stand for. Derivative, needlessly violent, no identity, no soul – it’s just Not Bond, dammit! All nonsense, of course. The open-minded know this brutal, brilliant outing is about as good as the series can get.

The Villain: Franz Sanchez is unquestionably the great forgotten villain of the franchise. He possesses all the vital characteristics: charm, »

- simonbrew

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Back to the Future turns 30: How the world looked in 1955, 1985 and 2015

1 July 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

In the run-up to Back to the Future's 30th anniversary on July 3, Digital Spy presents a week of special features celebrating the time-travel classic.

Has it really been 30 years since Back to the Future first arrived in cinemas? The '80s classic is one of those films that stands firm under repeat viewings, retaining its humour, heart and on-point performances from Michael J Fox, Christopher Lloyd and co. Simply put, there isn't a frame out of place in Back to the Future.

Though Robert Zemeckis's film still feels as fresh as ever, the world has changed dramatically across the three main periods the Back to the Future series spans. Digital Spy digs deep into the history books to find out how the world looked in 1955, 1984, and where we are now.

-1955-

Movies

Marty sweeps to victory at the Oscars, winning for Best Picture, Director and Actor

James Dean »

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Sherlock Holmes: 10 offbeat takes on the Great Detective

29 June 2015 5:49 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From spoofs to point-and-click adventure games, here are 10 of the most memorable unusual incarnations of Sherlock Holmes...

We don’t know a great deal about the content of the 90-minute Sherlock special set to air later this year, but one thing has emerged from the set photos and tantalising titbits of information we’ve seen so far. Sherlock Holmes and John Watson will be in nineteenth-century garb, pitching them back into the setting of the legendary detective’s original adventures: 1895, to be precise. Why that happens is as yet unclear, but all will be revealed.

For those still craving their Holmes fix in the meantime, the new film Mr. Holmes offers us Ian McKellen’s take on the character, musing upon an old case as he looks back on his long career from the vantage point of retirement. Jonny Lee Miller’s ultra-modern, Us-based Sherlock will be entering his fourth »

- louisamellor

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R.I.P. Patrick Macnee (1922 – 2015)

26 June 2015 11:58 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Actor Patrick Macnee – who was best known for his role as secret agent John Steed in the classic 1960s spy series The Avengers – has passed away at his home in California on Thursday, aged 93.

Born in London in 1922, Macnee studied at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art but had to put his fledgling acting career on hold when he was called up to serve in the Royal Navy during World War II.

Following his service, he appeared in films such as Scrooge (151) and The Battle of the River Plate, before securing his career defining turn in The Avengers, which ran between 1961 and 1969.

Macnee would reprise the role of John Steed for the 1976 revival The New Avengers, while his subsequent credits included the likes of The Howling, This Is Spinal Tap, A View to a Kill and Waxwork. He also lent his voice to Invisible Jones in the 1998 feature adaptation of The Avengers, »

- Gary Collinson

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Patrick Macnee, star of The Avengers, dies aged 93

26 June 2015 2:09 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

London-born actor was best known for his role as dapper John Steed in 1960s ‘spy-fi’ series, but also appeared in Spinal Tap and Bond film A View to a Kill

Patrick Macnee, the actor best known for playing John Steed in the 1960s television series The Avengers, has died at the age of 93.

His family were at his bedside at his home in Rancho Mirage, California, his son Rupert said in a statement published on Thursday on Macnee’s website.

Related: Patrick Macnee obituary

So very sad to hear Pat MacNee has left us. We were mates from 1950s and I have so many happy memories of working with him. A true gent.

Related: Patrick Macnee's life – in pictures

Continue reading »

- Chris Johnston

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Patrick MacNee, Star Of "The Avengers", Dead At 93

25 June 2015 7:38 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Macnee with Honor Blackman in an early episode of The Avengers.

The distinguished British actor Patrick Macnee has passed away at age 93. Macnee personified the "typical" English gentleman in scores of films and TV appearances. He rose to fame as John Steed, the star of "The Avengers", the iconic TV series from the 1960s. He initially co-starred with Honor Blackman, then later Diana Rigg and Linda Thorson. He starred in "The New Avengers" in 1976. Macnee's also had a thriving career as a character actor in feature films. He appeared as young Jacob Marley in the classic 1951 version of "A Christmas Carol", as well as such diverse fare as "The Sea Wolves" , director Joe Dante's "The Howling" and spoofs such as "Young Doctors in Love" and "This is Spinal Tap". Macnee co-starred with his old friend Roger Moore in the 1985 James Bond film "A View to a Kill". He also »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Roger Moore honours A View to a Kill co-star Patrick Macnee: 'We had many happy times'

25 June 2015 1:18 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Sir Roger Moore has called his late A View to a Kill co-star Patrick Macnee "a true gent".

Macnee's family confirmed earlier today (June 25) that the legendary Avengers actor had passed away at his California home.

Moore's seventh and final James Bond movie A View to a Kill famously featured Macnee as the spy's sidekick Sir Godfrey Tibbett in a tongue-in-cheek nod to his Avengers past.

Writing on Twitter today, Moore paid tribute to Macnee: "So very sad to hear Pat MacNee has left us.

"We were mates from 1950s and I have so many happy memories of working with him. A true gent."

So very sad to hear Pat MacNee has left us. We were mates from 1950s and I have so many happy memories of working with him. A true gent.

Sir Roger Moore (@sirrogermoore) June 25, 2015

Fans and friends the world over have been paying tribute to Macnee »

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Patrick Macnee 1922-2015: Look back at The Avengers star's career in pictures

25 June 2015 12:52 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Patrick Macnee captured the hearts of millions worldwide with his iconic role as the secret agent John Steed in 1960s spy series The Avengers.

While Macnee was best known for playing John Steed, he also played Doctor Watson opposite Sir Christopher Lee's Sherlock Holmes, scared a whole generation of kids as Battlestar Galactica's Imperious Leader, and spoofed his beloved spy role in A View to a Kill.

In honour of the late actor, we look back at his life in pictures:

Patrick Macnee 1922-2015: Friends and fans pay tribute to The Avengers star

What was your favourite role from Patrick Macnee's career? Let us know in our comments section below: »

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‘Avengers’ TV Show Star Patrick Macnee Dies at 93

25 June 2015 11:49 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Patrick Macnee, famous for his role on “The Avengers” British TV series, died Thursday of natural causes at his home in Rancho Mirage, Calif. He was 93.

Macnee, who played John Steed in the spy-fi show, died with his family at his bedside.

“Wherever he went, he left behind a trove of memories,” a statement on the actor’s website read. “Patrick Macnee was a popular figure in the television industry. He was at home wherever in the world he found himself. He had a knack for making friends, and keeping them.”

The Avengers” initially focused on Dr. David Keel (Ian Hendry) and his assistant (Macnee), but Macnee’s famously bowler hat wearing, umbrella-wielding intelligence officer (he never used a gun) became the protagonist when Hendry exited the series. Macnee played the part alongside a succession of strong, female partners, including Honor Blackman, Diana Rigg and Joanna Lumley. The show ran »

- Maane Khatchatourian

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The Avengers star Patrick Macnee dies, aged 93

25 June 2015 11:35 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Patrick Macnee - star of iconic 1960s spy series The Avengers - has died, aged 93.

A statement posted on the English actor's official website announced that he passed away at his family home.

The statement read: "Daniel Patrick Macnee died a natural death at his home in Rancho Mirage, California, at age 93, with his family at his bedside, according to his son, Rupert."

Macnee is best known for playing the quintessential secret agent John Steed in the beloved television series The Avengers from 1961 through 1969.

His partnerships with Honor Blackman and Dame Diana Rigg made The Avengers an international phenomenon in the '60s.

The Avengers lasted for six series in its original run, with Macnee later pairing with Joanna Lumley and Gareth Hunt for a revamped New Avengers in the late 1970s.

Aside from the iconic spy series, he also played Arthur Conan Doyle's Doctor Watson opposite the recently-deceased »

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Patrick Macnee dies by Jennie Kermode - 2015-06-25 19:29:22

25 June 2015 11:29 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Patrick Macnee as John Steed

Patrick Macnee, who was much loved for his role as John Steed in The Avengers and also enjoyed a successful film career, has died at his home in California at the age of 93.

Born into a wealthy English family, Macnee studied at Eton until he was expelled for selling pornography, went on to serve in the Royal Navy and then travelled to Canada to try his hand at acting, launching a career that would last until his retirement 12 years ago.

Following an early appearance in The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, he went on to deliver notable performances in films including The Howling, Waxwork, A View To A Kill and This Is Spinal Tap. He lent his vocal talents to Battlestar Galactica and challenged Columbo. Alongside the Avengers, he appeared in other classic TV series like Rawhide and Magnum Pi. He played both Sherlock Holmes and Doctor. »

- Jennie Kermode

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James Bond 007: revisiting The Living Daylights

21 June 2015 11:07 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The first of Timothy Dalton's pair of James Bond 007 adventures. We look back at The Living Daylights...

This one's strong, if uneven. The Living Daylights has a lot going for it, not least a lean, sharkish Timothy Dalton, tight of smile and cold of eye. Other strengths include a plot that actually goes places (even if they aren’t always the right ones), a great soundtrack, a palpably menacing hitman and the enjoyably retro prominence of the Cold War. All well and good. However, the central villains are a weakness, neither really working alone or as a duo. The girl is admirable but a little trying. The pace sometimes flags and the stakes never rise. Despite a standout fight aboard an aeroplane (as good as Bond gets) the film never quite takes off.

The Villains: A three-in-one deal. Never a great sign: quality is rarely offered in quantity. Georgi Koskov is a cheerful, »

- simonbrew

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James Bond 007: revisiting A View To A Kill

31 May 2015 11:38 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Roger Moore bows out as James Bond 007, in A View To A Kill. It's a film with a few problems...

This one's an unworthy last hurrah for Sir Rog. Yet such is life. Received wisdom pegs A View To A Kill as a lacklustre final outing in which an inspired song, villain and Grace Jones are smothered by slack plotting, a not-at-his-best Moore, weak characters and a general sense of weariness. Received wisdom is a terrible thing. But occasionally it has a point.

The Villain: To waste one great villain on a rubbish film may be classed as unfortunate. To waste a second is damned careless. Max Zorin is Exhibit B to counter the hoary old adage that a Bond film is measured by its antagonist. Zorin is fresh, vibrant, energetic – the inverse of the film he terrorises. He’s played by a Hollywood legend in his prime: good for the character, »

- simonbrew

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The Rock faces off against the Big One in San Andreas

28 May 2015 2:22 PM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Dwayne Johnson has played his share of outsized heroes over the years. His characters have taken down crazed criminals and evil empires. He's crushed an army of fire ants with his chin. He's even flexed his way out of a plaster cast.

But not even "The Rock" can beat an earthquake.

In San Andreas, Hollywood's latest venture into the well-trod territory of disaster films, the famed fault line takes the spotlight as the unforgiving cause of a series of devastating earthquakes from Los Angeles to San Francisco.

The 810-mile long rift might not have the maniacal drive of Ultron or the eat-or-be-eaten focus of genetically engineered dinosaurs, but as blockbuster villains go, it does have the distinction of being a real threat to many people.

That's part of the reason why it has proved to be such a compelling cinematic foe. Whether triggered by natural causes as in 1974's Earthquake, »

- Cineplex.com and contributors

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James Bond 007: revisiting Octopussy

17 May 2015 2:12 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We've arrived at Roger Moore's penultimate Bond. But isn't it about time somebody fought Octopussy's corner?

After the comedown of For Your Eyes Only, the series is back on a high. A very good-natured, occasionally thrilling escapade that boasts an impressive roster of villains, a finely developed heroine, unusually meaty roles for series stalwarts General Gogol and Q, a nuclear bomb and a gloriously stupid title. Yes, Roger Moore has aged to the point where counting the wrinkles is a legitimate distraction. And many valid criticisms can be levelled about plot and credibility. But the good outweighs, or certainly overwhelms, the bad in Octopussy. Still, he really should have quit after this one.

The Villain: Kamal Khan got his break by winning the talent competition Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Singing Superstar - and that was just the beginning. 2012 hit Ishk Sufiana launched Khan into stardom and he bagged »

- simonbrew

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10 Best James Bond Movies Of All Time

13 May 2015 9:13 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

MGM

It’s been 53 years since Dr. No first introduced cinema-goers to James Bond, author (and former Oss agent) Ian Fleming’s incredibly English secret agent. At this point, there have been 23 official Bond movies made since 1962 (there’s another on the way in November – you’ve probably heard), with six different actors playing 007 through six different decades.

Obviously it’s difficult to maintain consistency over 53 years, and not every Bond film has been totally successful. 007’s is a strange franchise in that it goes through periods of apparently immense cultural importance as well as periods where it seems like the character’s day is done, and through those times the series has been responsible for as many dire moments as great ones.

Thankfully, the Bond franchise’s best movies more than make up for the weaker ones. It’s the longest-running movie series for a reason, and the reason »

- Brogan Morris

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Is it time for a new Iron Man?

29 April 2015 2:41 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Anghus Houvouras on whether it’s time for a new Iron Man

Sometimes an actor is so perfectly suited for a role you can’t even imagine anyone else in the part. That was certainly the case when we first saw Robert Downey Jr. playing Tony Stark in Marvel’s Iron Man. He had the suave, debonair, devil-may-care attitude and the kind of real life demons that gave Stark the potential for an epic dark side. I doubt there’s a lot of people who watched Iron Man and thought that Marvel hadn’t hit a home run with both the film and their choice to launch their long-awaited Cinematic Universe.

The second Iron Man was an absolutely awful follow-up. A movie that got so much wrong with the same creative team that you began to wonder if the success of the original was little more than dumb luck. Downey »

- Anghus Houvouras

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The Evolution of James Bond

21 April 2015 9:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Code number 007 is on the mind of fans as they anticipate the new Bond film which is expected to be released this year.

Commander James Bond, Cmg, Rn is a fictional character created by novelist and British journalist Ian Fleming in 1952. Bond is a Secret Service agent who is a composite based upon a number of commandos known by Ian Fleming during his service in the Naval Intelligence Division during World War II. The character’s name was appropriated by Fleming from American ornithologist James Bond. The code number 007 is from one of the key achievements of British naval intelligence, breaking the German diplomatic code in World War I.

Fleming’s fiction character appeared in a series of twelve novels, two short story collections, a number of continuation novels, and over twenty Bond films. Spanning more than half of a century, there have been several actors who played James Bond on the big screen. »

- Gary Collinson

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

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