IMDb > In a Glass Cage (1986)
Tras el cristal
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

In a Glass Cage (1986) More at IMDbPro »Tras el cristal (original title)

Photos (See all 5 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.0/10   2,483 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 1% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Contact:
View company contact information for In a Glass Cage on IMDbPro.
Genre:
Plot:
In Spain, the former Nazi doctor Klaus tries to commit suicide jumping off the roof of his manor. However... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
An unflinching gaze into the abyss of human corruption See more (33 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)
Günter Meisner ... Klaus (as Gunter Meisner)
David Sust ... Angelo

Marisa Paredes ... Griselda
Gisèle Echevarría ... Rena (as Gisela Echevarria)
Imma Colomer ... Jornalera (as Inma Colomer)
Josuè Guasch ... Niño Cantor (as Josue Guasch)
David Cuspinera ... Niño barracon
Ricardo Carcelero ... Angelo Niño
Alberto Manzano ... Niño Gitano

Directed by
Agustí Villaronga  (as Agustín Villaronga)
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Agustí Villaronga  (as Agustín Villaronga)

Produced by
Teresa Enrich .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Javier Navarrete 
 
Cinematography by
Jaume Peracaula 
 
Film Editing by
Raúl Román 
 
Production Design by
Francesc Candini  (as Cesc Candini)
 
Costume Design by
Andrés Urdiciaian  (as Andres Urdiciaian)
Imma Vallmitjana  (as Inma Vallmitjana)
 
Makeup Department
Maria Rosa Benavides .... hair stylist (as Mª Rosa Benavides)
Jose .... make-up and hair assistant
J. Ruiz Alonso .... make-up and hair assistant
Elisenda Villanueva .... makeup artist (as Elisenda de Villanueva)
 
Production Management
Biel Moll .... assistant production manager
Paco Poch .... production manager
Karen Wardle .... assistant production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Francisco G. Siurana .... assistant director (as Paco Siurana)
 
Art Department
Jordi Artigau .... set dresser
José Ángel Cebollada .... props (as Jose Angel Cebollada)
Carme Curt .... props
Guillermo Fernández .... painter (as Guillermo Fernandez)
José Martínez .... carpenter (as Jose Martinez)
América Sánchez .... graphic designer (as America Sanchez)
Isidro Terraza .... property master
 
Sound Department
Ricard Casals .... sound re-recording mixer
Licio Marcos de Oliveira .... sound mixer
 
Special Effects by
Reyes Abades .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Francisco Esteban .... electrician
Sergi Gallardo .... second assistant camera (as Sergio Gallardo)
Manolo Ovler .... electrician
Jaume Peracaula .... camera operator
Apolinar Ramiro .... gaffer (as A. Ramiro)
Núria Roldos .... assistant camera (as Nuria Roldos)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Rosa Fernández .... seamstress
 
Editorial Department
Montse Jiménez .... second assistant editor (as Montse Jimenez)
José Montilla .... post-production coordinator (as Jose Montilla)
Juan Peláez .... assistant editor (as Juan Antonio Pelaez)
 
Other crew
Olga Selva .... production secretary
Cristina Solé .... script supervisor (as Cristina Sole)
 
Thanks
Marisa Aguinaga .... special thanks
Jordi Coca .... special thanks
Jordi Corba .... special thanks
Pepón Coromina .... special thanks (as Pepon Coromina)
Enric Jorba .... special thanks
Poli Ramiro .... special thanks
Rosa Vergés .... special thanks (as Rosa Verges)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Tras el cristal" - Spain (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
110 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
For the scene where Angelo cried, actor David Sust put toothpaste under the eyes. He shot the scenes so many times that he injured his eyes and had to wear sunglasses for a while.See more »
Quotes:
Klaus:[talking to a child] Want a cigarette? Want to make some money?See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
46 out of 60 people found the following review useful.
An unflinching gaze into the abyss of human corruption, 12 January 2005
Author: Libretio

IN A GLASS CAGE (Tras el Cristal)

Aspect ratio: 1.85:1

Sound format: Mono

Confined to an iron lung following an unsuccessful suicide attempt, a former Nazi doctor (Gunter Meisner) is visited in his isolated country home by a mysterious young man (David Sust) who professes knowledge of Meisner's 'work' with adolescent boys in the concentration camps, where the doctor had cultivated an appetite for sadistic sexual abuse. Harboring terrible secrets of his own, Sust begins to undermine Meisner's terrified family, culminating in a resumption of the doctor's hideous 'experiments'...

Agustín Villaronga's magnificent feature debut premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 1986, where it was alternately cheered and denounced for its unflinching gaze into the abyss of human corruption, and the movie's extreme subject matter prompted its subsequent lapse into obscurity. However, Villaronga's subsequent works - including MOON CHILD (1989) and EL MAR (1999) - have travelled the international festival circuit to great acclaim, leading to a belated reappraisal of IN A GLASS CAGE, his darkest, most harrowing movie to date. Ostensibly a slow-burning melodrama punctuated by a series of Hitchcockian/Argentoesque set-pieces (most notably a nerve-shredding sequence in which Almodóvar favorite Marisa Paredes - here playing Meisner's harried wife - is stalked through the house by Sust when she becomes surplus to his requirements), the film asks profound questions about the monsters which lurk inside each and every one of us, and illustrates with startling clarity the cyclical nature of sexual abuse. Some viewers, especially parents of young children, will undoubtedly be horrified by some of the confrontational material included here, as Villaronga refuses to soft-peddle the horrors conjured by his nightmare scenario (the movie's second murder is especially shocking, though there's very little on-screen gore). In a brief interview published in 2003, the director explained how some of the more unpleasant scenes involving children were created by having them play a series of innocent 'games' which were then edited into the finished product, and there's a disclaimer in the closing credits which offers an unequivocal reassurance that none of the young actors were exposed to anything inappropriate during filming, and that a child psychologist was present during the recording of those sequences.

Beautifully played by a fearless cast (veterans Meisner and Paredes are appropriately subdued, whilst newcomer Sust makes a startling transition from handsome, fresh-faced innocent to strident Nazi demi-god, rampaging through Meisner's increasingly devastated home with newfound sexual maturity) and filmed with genuine skill by a top-notch production team, Villaronga's extraordinary film explores the wartime ghosts which continue to haunt the collective European consciousness. To his eternal credit, the director approaches his subject with deadly seriousness: Using numerous cutaways to photographs of children taken in concentration camps at the end of the Second World War, he deflects any suggestion of 'exploitation' by constantly reminding viewers of the historical truth which underpins his fictional drama. By turns haunting, horrific and deeply disturbing, IN A GLASS CAGE is an authentic masterpiece, arguably one of the finest - and most difficult - movies to emerge from Spain during the 20th century. However, be warned: Not everyone will be swayed by the film's courage and audacity, and some viewers will be genuinely shocked by Villaronga's uncompromising approach to the material.

(Spanish dialogue)

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (33 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for In a Glass Cage (1986)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Why did he keep Angelo since he bought nothing but bad news rustynail925
Music femmefatale3000
Similarly effective horror films? elephantsinamsterdam
Lame? alabamamudflap
Having trouble with the ending americanme81
interesting article about the film NewJeruPoet
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
A Serbian Film Ex Drummer The Cat o' Nine Tails Torso Ichi the Killer
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb Spain section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.