Based on true story of teens Richard and Deborah Jahnke charged in Wyoming for the killing of their abusive father.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Richard Jahnke Sr.
Christopher Collet ...
Richard Jahnke Jr.
Karmin Murcelo ...
Maria Jahnke
...
Deborah Jahnke
...
Eve Whitcomb
...
Jim Barrett
...
Vera Scofield
...
Maj. Eckworth
...
Candy
...
Social worker
Randy Moore ...
Counselor
...
Detective
...
Mr. Harris
...
Det. Roberts
Robert Ginnaven ...
Det. Marquez
Edit

Storyline

Based on true story of teens Richard and Deborah Jahnke charged in Wyoming for the killing of their abusive father.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A gun separates the men...from the boys.

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 May 1985 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Aftodikia  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Members of the Jahnke family protested the title of this TV movie before it aired. See more »

Connections

References Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Depressingly accurate child-abuse potboiler
27 September 1999 | by (Washington, DC) – See all my reviews

Frederic Forrest does a fine job as the emotionally and physically abusive father in this early entry in the "dysfunctional family" genre. Here's a toast to all the actors who have to do the dirty job of making child abusers, rapists, and wife-beaters come alive on screen; it must be harrowing, thankless work.

The writer and director should get credit too, for giving Forrest the lines and settings for his truly creepy performance. All the actors did well -- Justine Bateman was nominated for a Golden Globe for her portrayal of Deborah Jahnke -- but Forrest should get special kudos. (Don't you wonder if anyone would eat lunch with him on the set? or if they shunned him for the duration?)

The film's mission of revealing the gaps in our domestic violence policies works as well as a drama as a political statement. A teacher is slow to believe; a social worker questions the kids and mother about abuse in front of the abuser; the rural home has no near neighbors and the rural community presumably has limited shelter resources.

Gossip in town that acquitting the Wyoming teen will be a "license to kill" for other abused kids not only reflects this case (the writers relied on interviews, transcripts, and news reports), but echoes what was said about one of the first battered wives to go on trial for killing an abuser in Michigan, years before.

Watch it if you've got a strong stomach or a strong interest in domestic violence. Otherwise, it's too much of a downer to qualify as "entertainment," despite the excellent performances and powerful script.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?